Share of renewable energy up to 7.4 percent

In 2018, renewable energy sources accounted for 7.4 percent of total Dutch energy consumption, up from 6.6 percent one year previously. More than half of this increase was due to higher biomass consumption, mainly in the form of biodiesel and biogasoline. This is reported by Statistics Netherlands (CBS).

Share of renewable energy in gross final energy consumption (%)
 Wind energySolar energyBiomassOther
20000.130.021.470.02
20010.140.031.510.02
20020.170.031.640.03
20030.220.031.570.04
20040.270.031.710.04
20050.320.042.10.04
20060.40.042.30.06
20070.510.042.70.07
20080.620.042.860.09
20090.730.053.370.13
20100.690.053.040.14
20110.780.063.50.18
20120.810.083.580.21
20130.880.123.470.26
20141.040.193.920.33
20151.20.253.890.4
20161.430.333.710.46
20171.640.434.020.51
20181.700.604.510.61

Total renewable energy consumption in the Netherlands amounted to 158 petajoules (PJ) in 2018, 13 percent up on the previous year. Gross final energy consumption stood at around 2,100 PJ last year, just as in 2017.

Wind and solar energy consumption (petajoules)
 Onshore wind energyOffshore wind energySolar energy
201114.3362.6741.416
201214.9632.8171.757
201316.6762.6482.582
201418.2152.73.739
201521.1743.7275.127
201621.7488.3626.913
201722.5612.159.08
2018*23.46912.31312.672
* = provisional figure

Surge in solar energy, wind energy stable

In 2018, solar energy consumption (for electricity and heat) increased by 40 percent to 13 PJ. The installed capacity of solar panels used to generate solar power saw a record increase of over 1,500 megawatts (MW) to a total of 4,400 MW.

At the same time, wind energy production rose by 4 percent to 36 PJ. The installed capacity of wind turbines went up from 4,200 MW at the end of 2017 to 4,400 MW one year after. In 2018, 66 onshore wind turbines with a total capacity of 210 MW were added, while 18 turbines (20 MW in total) were dismantled. The offshore wind farm capacity did not change and remained at around approximately 1,000 MW.

Renewable energy consumption from biomass sources (petajoules)
 2018*2017
Waste incineration plants16.90719.963
Auxiliary and co-combustion of biomass in power plants3.0942.335
Biomass households19.94919.465
Biomass boilers at companies, electricity11.2129.461
Biomass boilers at companies, only heat11.2679.728
Biogas10.84510.581
Liquid biofuels for transport22.80913.483
* = provisional figure

Consumption of biodiesel and biogasoline has surged

With a share of 61 percent, biomass is the largest source of renewable energy; consumption rose by 13 percent to 96 PJ in 2018. Consumption of biodiesel and biogasoline increased in particular. An important factor is the tightening of the Energy for Transport legislation, which regulates the so-called blending obligation.

Energy consumption from biomass combustion on the rise

Energy consumption from biomass also increased because coal plants have started to burn 33 percent more biomass. Biomass consumption by companies using waste heat boilers rose by 16 percent, mainly as a result of new biomass boiler installations. There are also installations which generate electricity from solid biomass combustion, possibly combined with heat production. For the past two years, the trend has been that these installations have started to produce and supply more heat to industrial companies and for district heating purposes. This additional heat has been at the expense of electricity production. Heat is generated with a higher return than electricity, which on balance has led to an increase in renewable energy consumption levels.

Less renewable energy from waste incineration plants

Renewable energy consumption from waste incineration plants dropped by 15 percent relative to 2017. In this case, heat production was reduced in favour of electricity, which is generated with a much lower return than heat production.

Sources

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