Netherlands fifth exporter of services in the EU

29/03/2011 15:00

After the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Spain, the Netherlands was the fifth largest exporter of services in the European Union (EU) in 2009 with a value of nearly 82 billion euro. The total value of Dutch exports of goods was 309 billion euro in 2009. The Netherlands is the second largest exporter of goods in the EU after Germany

Value of exports of services EU countries, 2009

Value of exports of services EU countries, 2009

More royalties and less tourist traffic

The most important services exported by the Netherlands are in the category ‘other business services’ like research and development, consultancy and architectural and engineering services. The value totals 27 billion euro followed by transport services with a value of 18 billion.

Compared to other EU countries, royalties and licence duties and other business services proportionally constitute a larger part of Dutch services exports. The share of royalties and licence duties for the Netherlands was approximately 18 percent versus 4 percent for the EU, but the share of tourist traffic in Dutch services exports was much smaller.

Value of exports broken down by type of service, 2009

Value of exports broken down by type of service, 2009

Germany most important country of destination for exports

Within the EU, Germany is the main country of destination for exports of Dutch services. The total value of trade in services to Germany was nearly 11 billion euro in 2009. Germany is followed by Ireland and the United Kingdom with 10 and 9 billion euro respectively.

Top 5 countries of destination for Dutch exports of services in the EU, 2009

Top 5 countries of destination for Dutch exports of services in the EU, 2009

Germany: predominantly tourist traffic and transport services

Tourist traffic and transport services were the most important services Germany bought from the Netherlands in 2009. The Netherlands mainly exported royalties and licence duties to Ireland and ‘other business services’ to the United Kingdom.

Miriam van Baal and Chantal Lemmens-Dirix