People with disablement less active on the job market

12/09/2006 14:00

In 2005 one in six people indicated that a chronic illness, affliction or disability hampered then in finding or carrying out paid work. This is close to 1.8 million people with a disablement. Since 2002 the share of people with a disablement who work or who are actively looking for work has decreased.

Labour participation rate down

In 2005 only 44 percent of all people with a disablement were active on the job market. The participation rate of all people aged 15–64 was substantially higher, namely close to 68 percent. While the gross participation rate, the percentage of employed and unemployed people added together, remained about the same among all people aged 15–64 in the period 2002–2005, it fell from 47 to 44 percent for people with a disablement.

Gross participation rate of people with a disablement

Gross participation rate of people with a disablement

More wish to work

The decrease in the participation rate is in contrast with the increase in the share of people with a disablement who wish to work but who are not actively looking for a job. In 2005 this was 9 percent of people with a disablement. Because they are not actively looking for work, they are not considered unemployed. In 2002 this was the case with 7 percent of people with a disablement.

Six in ten people with a disablement over 45

In 2005 six in ten people with a disablement were aged 45–64, versus four in ten for the population as a whole. The group of people with a disablement ages at the same rate as the total population, as the share of people with a disablement per age group is very stable. Therefore the decreasing participation rate of people with a disablement cannot be explained by aging.

Gross participation rate of people with a disablement by age

Gross participation rate of people with a disablement by age

Stable participation rate among older people with a disablement

The participation rate of people with a disablement aged 45–64 stayed just about the same between 2002 and 2005. For the population in that age bracket as a whole the participation rate increased because women work more often.
The participation rate among people with a disablement aged up to 45 fell in the period 2002–2005. They are often not part of the active labour force. There were many people with a disablement in this age group who would like to have a job of twelve hours a week or more, but who haven’t been looking for work recently.

Hendrika Lautenbach