GDP, output and expenditures; value, QNA, 1995- Q1 2024

GDP, output and expenditures; value, QNA, 1995- Q1 2024

Type of data Periods Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Gross domestic product (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Imports of goods (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Imports of services (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure Households including NPISHs (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure General government (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Gross fixed capital formation Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Gross fixed capital formation Enterprises and households (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Gross fixed capital formation General government (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Changes in inventories incl. valuables (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Exports of goods (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Exports of services (million euros)
Prices of 2015 2022 1st quarter* 340,044 193,630 146,603 111,681 35,450 340,044 172,541 131,295 83,777 47,482 40,961 34,551 6,403 381 167,789 127,415 40,882
Prices of 2015 2022 2nd quarter* 360,511 207,149 153,424 116,330 37,679 360,511 183,149 138,114 86,785 51,305 44,202 37,845 6,327 818 177,896 131,746 46,549
Prices of 2015 2022 3rd quarter* 352,337 198,002 154,543 115,253 39,539 352,337 175,664 136,200 87,516 48,671 38,058 31,611 6,440 1,441 177,103 130,870 46,283
Prices of 2015 2022 4th quarter* 365,775 207,629 158,155 124,313 34,301 365,775 179,776 138,666 86,330 52,311 42,110 35,536 6,553 -1,013 186,456 144,351 42,278
Prices of 2015 2022* 1,418,665 806,415 612,704 467,532 146,976 1,418,665 711,114 544,265 344,414 199,765 165,332 139,545 25,722 1,618 709,231 534,314 175,977
Prices of 2015 2023 1st quarter* 348,961 197,186 151,859 115,930 36,450 348,961 176,001 134,727 85,923 48,767 43,438 37,118 6,294 -2,009 173,197 132,191 41,452
Prices of 2015 2023 2nd quarter* 361,824 206,848 154,949 117,667 37,848 361,824 184,978 140,015 87,108 52,872 45,564 39,048 6,484 -567 177,427 131,869 45,898
Prices of 2015 2023 3rd quarter* 344,678 196,434 148,690 109,764 39,314 344,678 174,900 137,542 86,538 50,968 38,623 31,938 6,681 -1,118 170,334 125,485 44,947
Prices of 2015 2023 4th quarter* 358,810 206,850 152,256 118,697 34,110 358,810 182,235 140,548 86,235 54,270 40,938 34,223 6,705 615 177,420 136,337 41,376
Prices of 2015 2023* 1,414,293 807,350 607,683 461,960 147,727 1,414,293 718,080 552,832 345,835 206,875 168,575 142,342 26,165 -3,073 698,354 525,775 173,665
Prices of 2015 2024 1st quarter* 342,098 195,724 146,384 110,176 36,657 342,098 176,354 137,295 86,847 50,442 41,762 . . -2,614 165,917 124,255 42,148
Current prices 2022 1st quarter* 402,685 226,933 175,752 135,240 40,512 402,685 200,597 151,883 95,210 56,673 48,782 41,426 7,356 -68 202,088 156,076 46,012
Current prices 2022 2nd quarter* 444,566 241,615 202,951 159,014 43,937 444,566 218,517 161,864 101,641 60,223 52,985 45,633 7,352 3,668 226,049 172,547 53,502
Current prices 2022 3rd quarter* 444,337 238,450 205,887 158,440 47,447 444,337 215,658 164,414 105,368 59,046 46,202 38,597 7,605 5,042 228,679 174,321 54,358
Current prices 2022 4th quarter* 462,169 251,551 210,618 168,638 41,980 462,169 220,324 173,412 108,854 64,558 51,899 43,953 7,946 -4,987 241,845 191,953 49,892
Current prices 2022* 1,753,757 958,549 795,208 621,332 173,876 1,753,757 855,096 651,573 411,073 240,500 199,868 169,609 30,259 3,655 898,661 694,897 203,764
Current prices 2023 1st quarter* 442,941 249,558 193,383 147,166 46,217 442,941 221,497 171,603 110,485 61,118 53,963 46,377 7,586 -4,069 221,444 171,287 50,157
Current prices 2023 2nd quarter* 458,851 262,920 195,931 147,987 47,944 458,851 235,922 178,097 112,647 65,450 56,911 49,034 7,877 914 222,929 166,211 56,718
Current prices 2023 3rd quarter* 440,277 255,242 185,035 134,901 50,134 440,277 227,690 178,660 113,363 65,297 48,782 40,514 8,268 248 212,587 157,111 55,476
Current prices 2023 4th quarter* 455,736 266,366 189,370 145,524 43,846 455,736 234,096 183,108 113,378 69,730 52,263 43,918 8,345 -1,275 221,640 170,394 51,246
Current prices 2023* 1,797,805 1,034,086 763,719 575,578 188,141 1,797,805 919,205 711,468 449,873 261,595 211,919 179,843 32,076 -4,182 878,600 665,003 213,597
Current prices 2024 1st quarter* 442,984 265,093 177,891 130,130 47,761 442,984 233,162 182,445 115,504 66,941 54,496 . . -3,779 209,822 156,564 53,258
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Dataset is not available.


This table provides data from Quarterly National Accounts (QNA) of Statistics The Netherlands. It contains quarterly and annual data on production, expenditures, income and external economic transactions of The Netherlands.

Data available from 1995.

Status of the figures:
Annual data of the period 1995-2021 are final. Quarterly data from 2021 are provisional. Since this table has been discontinued, provisional data will not become final.

Changes as of June 24th 2024:
None. This table has been discontinued.
Statistics Netherlands has carried out a revision of the national accounts. The Dutch national accounts are recently revised. New statistical sources, methods and concepts are implemented in the national accounts, in order to align the picture of the Dutch economy with all underlying source data and international guidelines for the compilation of the national accounts.
This table contains revised data. For further information see section 3.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore.

Description topics

Expenditure approach to GDP
The way GDP is formed by underlying components in the so-called expenditure approach. In this approach the components are consumption by households, consumption by the general government, gross fixed capital formation, changes in inventories and exports, minus imports. Changes in inventories are included for consistency with the production approach. From the 2010 edition of the European System of Accounts onwards these changes are added to fixed capital formation. Consumption, fixed capital formation and changes in inventories add up to the so-called national final expenditure. By adding exports final expenditure is obtained. Intermediate consumption, goods and services used upon production, is not part of final expenditure.
Disposable for final expenditure
The total amount of domestic generated goods and services (GDP) and the imported goods and services are adding up to the disposable for final expenditure. This variable is by definition equal to the total final expenditure, which is the sum of the National final expenditure and the exports of goods and services.
Total
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product (GDP) is a quantity that expresses the size of an economy. The volume change of GDP during a reference period expresses the growth or shrinkage of the economy. Gross domestic product at market prices is the final result of the production activity of resident producer units. It can be defined in three ways:

- production approach: GDP is the sum of gross value added of the various institutional sectors or the various industries plus taxes and less subsidies on products (which are not allocated to sectors and industries). It is also the balancing item in the total economy production account;
- expenditure approach: GDP is the sum of final uses of goods and services by resident institutional units (final consumption and gross capital formation), plus exports and minus imports of goods and services;
- income approach: GDP is the sum of uses in the total economy generation of income account (compensation of employees, taxes on production and imports less subsidies, gross operating surplus and mixed income of the total economy).

Net domestic product at market prices (NDP) can be obtained by deducting consumption of fixed capital from GDP.
Imports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from non-residents to residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Total
Imports of goods
Transactions in goods (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from non-residents to residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners. Part of the imports are raw materials, semi-finished products, fuel and fixed assets. Furthermore, imports of goods may be re-exports: goods that were imported before being exported, after having received at most minor adaptations.
Imports of services
Transactions in services (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of services applies among others to expenses made by Dutch companies abroad, like costs of transportation, banking costs and business travels. Imports by services are also made by the Dutch general government, among others by means of expenses made by Dutch embassies and consulates. Imports of services by households consist among others of imports of consumer goods and the direct consumptive expenditure by Dutch residents abroad.
Final expenditure
The sum of the National final expenditure and the exports of goods and services. This variable is by definition equal to the disposable final expenditure (GDP and imports).
Total
National final expenditure
The sum of the consumption of households and the government, gross fixed capital formation and changes in inventories.
Total
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that is households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Total
Households including NPISHs
Consumption expenditure by households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs). Not all expenses made by households are seen as consumptive, households may invest as well. These investments mainly concern the purchase of houses and substantial costs on maintenance. Small costs on maintenance, indoor painting and the purchase of furniture is classified as consumption. This also applies to the purchase of cars and car maintenance.
General government
Consumption expenditure by the general government sector. The output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. Purchases by general government of goods and services produced by market producers that are supplied to households as social transfers in kind are part of government consumption as well. Examples of this in the Netherlands are health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.

Government output consumed by the government is classified into collective consumption and individual consumption. Collective consumption by the government consists of services for collective consumption that are provided simultaneously to all members of the community. Examples of this are expenses on defense, environmental health or public governance. Individual consumption is made up of expenses that serve only part of the community. This concerns mainly education.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licenses.

Total
Enterprises and households
Gross fixed capital formation of (financial or non-financial) corporations and households and the sector households including non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs). Fixed capital formation by households concerns houses, but also investments by the self-employed.
General government
Gross fixed capital formation of the sector general government. Fixed capital formation by the general government concerns e.g. investments in public infrastructure, research and development and weapon systems.
Changes in inventories incl. valuables
Changes in inventories including acquisitions less disposals of valuables
Changes in the stock of raw materials, semi-finished products, work-in-progress (unfinished works like ships or oil rigs) and finished products still held by the producer. Changes in stock do not include progress made in construction. Positive changes in inventories arise when products are finished in the reference period but not yet sold. Alternatively, they arise when goods are purchased for intermediate consumption but not yet used. Negative changes in inventories arise when goods from stocks have been sold, or used in the production process. A more extensive list of changes in inventories is found in article 3.146 and further of the European System of Accounts 2010.

In measuring changes in inventories, changes in prices during the reference period are not allowed to have any effect. The initial and final inventory is therefor valued at the same price. Raw materials are valued at the price of purchase. Final products are valued at the selling price. Work-in-progress is valued at the cost-price.

Acquisitions less disposals of valuables This transaction consists of the acquisitions less disposals of precious stones, non-monetary gold, antiques, art objects and jewelry, that are acquired and held primarily as stores of value. In the national accounts this transaction is mostly combined with changes in inventories.
Exports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Total
Exports of goods
Transactions in goods (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners. Part of the exports of goods are re-exports: goods that were imported before being exported, after having received at most minor adaptations.
Exports of services
Transactions in services (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. Exports of services include among others the following cases: transportation by resident carriers abroad, harbor services and ship maintenance to non-residents, works performed abroad by resident contractors. Expenses made in the Netherlands by foreign tourists, diplomats and cross-border workers.