GDP, output and expenditures; value, QNA, 1995-2017

GDP, output and expenditures; value, QNA, 1995-2017

Dimensions Periods Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Total (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Gross domestic product (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Total (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Imports of goods (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Imports of services (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Total (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Total (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure Total (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure Households including NPISHs (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure General government (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Gross fixed capital formation Total (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Changes in inventories incl. valuables (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Total (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Exports of goods (mln euro) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Exports of services (mln euro)
Prices of 2010 2016 1st quarter* 287,362 163,622 123,524 92,423 31,106 287,362 143,483 110,850 70,873 39,961 33,984 -1,178 143,554 112,451 31,255
Prices of 2010 2016 2nd quarter* 297,267 169,147 127,694 95,716 32,098 297,267 151,158 115,019 71,339 43,663 36,569 -270 145,806 113,815 32,140
Prices of 2010 2016 3rd quarter* 292,584 164,774 127,341 93,486 33,940 292,584 146,931 112,348 72,337 39,996 33,353 1,428 145,364 112,057 33,524
Prices of 2010 2016 4th quarter* 303,257 174,571 128,223 96,557 31,758 303,257 154,260 115,984 73,135 42,820 37,150 1,291 148,698 115,669 33,208
Prices of 2010 2016* 1,180,468 672,093 506,750 378,150 128,909 1,180,468 595,811 454,193 287,682 166,444 141,052 1,271 583,395 453,978 130,111
Prices of 2010 2017 1st quarter* 299,568 169,081 130,349 98,650 31,828 299,568 147,055 112,606 72,138 40,446 35,957 -1,252 152,323 120,488 32,024
Prices of 2010 2017 2nd quarter* 307,824 174,877 132,521 100,116 32,609 307,824 154,980 117,261 73,096 44,134 38,005 -78 152,623 119,449 33,338
Prices of 2010 2017 3rd quarter* 305,248 169,789 135,075 99,408 35,780 305,248 150,342 114,717 74,120 40,574 35,565 320 154,767 119,205 35,791
Prices of 2010 2017 4th quarter* 316,280 179,620 136,312 101,733 34,596 316,280 157,074 117,090 73,847 43,213 39,445 798 159,094 122,603 36,659
Prices of 2010 2017* 1,228,915 693,346 534,228 399,873 134,802 1,228,915 609,432 461,670 293,201 168,373 148,969 -219 618,785 481,734 137,793
Prices of 2010 2018 1st quarter* 310,270 173,747 136,423 103,092 33,454 310,270 152,255 115,488 74,444 40,999 38,174 -1,057 157,819 124,118 33,901
Current prices 2016 1st quarter* 291,101 170,749 120,352 86,912 33,440 291,101 150,035 117,647 76,122 41,525 33,688 -1,300 141,066 109,490 31,576
Current prices 2016 2nd quarter* 301,278 176,193 125,085 90,915 34,170 301,278 158,386 122,304 77,082 45,222 36,381 -299 142,892 110,490 32,402
Current prices 2016 3rd quarter* 299,311 172,657 126,654 90,382 36,272 299,311 154,456 120,272 78,552 41,720 33,172 1,012 144,855 110,897 33,958
Current prices 2016 4th quarter* 312,920 183,042 129,878 96,001 33,877 312,920 162,416 124,151 78,936 45,215 36,808 1,457 150,504 117,050 33,454
Current prices 2016* 1,204,610 702,641 501,969 364,210 137,759 1,204,610 625,293 484,374 310,692 173,682 140,049 870 579,317 447,927 131,390
Current prices 2017 1st quarter* 313,762 177,872 135,890 101,265 34,625 313,762 155,632 121,536 78,835 42,701 35,667 -1,571 158,130 125,718 32,412
Current prices 2017 2nd quarter* 319,088 184,177 134,911 99,609 35,302 319,088 164,209 126,257 80,189 46,068 38,074 -122 154,879 120,877 34,002
Current prices 2017 3rd quarter* 317,179 180,098 137,081 98,457 38,624 317,179 160,149 124,652 81,889 42,763 35,700 -203 157,030 120,564 36,466
Current prices 2017 4th quarter* 331,422 191,021 140,401 102,980 37,421 331,422 167,536 127,286 80,997 46,289 39,415 835 163,886 126,287 37,599
Current prices 2017* 1,281,451 733,168 548,283 402,311 145,972 1,281,451 647,526 499,731 321,910 177,821 148,856 -1,061 633,925 493,446 140,479
Current prices 2018 1st quarter* 328,289 186,213 142,076 105,097 36,979 328,289 163,829 126,677 82,581 44,096 38,616 -1,464 164,460 129,572 34,888
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table provides data from Quarterly National Accounts (QNA) of Statistics The Netherlands. It contains quarterly and annual data on production, expenditures, income and external economic transactions of The Netherlands.

The above mentioned macroeconomic variables are presented in:

- Value at current prices, mln euro
- Value at current prices, mln euro, seasonally adjusted
- Value at prices of 2010, mln euro
- Value at prices of 2010, mln euro, seasonally adjusted

Data available from: 1995 first quarter up to and including 2018 first quarter.

Status of the figures:
The figures of the period 1995-2014 are final. Data of 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 are provisional. Since this table has been discontinued, data will not become final.

Changes as of June 22nd 2018:
None. This table has been discontinued.
Statistics Netherlands has carried out a revision of the national accounts. New statistical sources and estimation methods have been used during the revision. Therefore this table has been replaced by table GDP, output and expenditures; value, Quarterly National Accounts. For further information see section 3.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore.

Description topics

Expenditure approach to GDP
The way GDP is formed by underlying components in the so-called expenditure approach. In this approach the components are consumption by households, consumption by the general government, gross fixed capital formation, changes in inventories and exports, minus imports. Changes in inventories are included for consistency with the production approach. From the 2010 edition of the European System of Accounts onwards these changes are added to fixed capital formation. Consumption, fixed capital formation and changes in inventories add up to the so-called national final expenditure. By adding exports final expenditure is obtained. Intermediate consumption, goods and services used upon production, is not part of final expenditure.
Disposable for final expenditure
The total amount of domestic generated goods and services (GDP) and the imported goods and services are adding up to the disposable for final expenditure. This variable is by definition equal to the total final expenditure, which is the sum of the National final expenditure and theexports of goods and services.
Total
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product (GDP) is a quantity that expresses the size of an economy. The volume change of GDP during a reference period expresses the growth or shrinkage of the economy. Gross domestic product at market prices is the final result of the production activity of resident producer units. It can be defined in three ways:

- production approach: GDP is the sum of gross value added of the various institutional sectors or the various industries plus taxes and less subsidies on products (which are not allocated to sectors and industries). It is also the balancing item in the total economy production account;
- expenditure approach: GDP is the sum of final uses of goods and services by resident institutional units (final consumption and gross capital formation), plus exports and minus imports of goods and services;
- income approach: GDP is the sum of uses in the total economy generation of income account (compensation of employees, taxes on production and imports less subsidies, gross operating surplus and mixed income of the total economy).

Net domestic product at market prices (NDP) can be obtained by deducting consumption of fixed capital from GDP.
Imports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from non-residents to residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Total
Imports of goods
Transactions in goods (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from non-residents to residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners. Part of the imports are raw materials, semifinished products, fuel and fixed assets. Furthermore, imports of goods may be re-exports: goods that were imported before being exported, after having received at most minor adaptations.
Imports of services
Transactions in services (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of services applies among others to expenses made by Dutch companies abroad, like costs of transportation, banking costs and business travels. Imports by services are also made by the Dutch general government, among others by means of expenses made by Dutch embassies and consulates. Imports of services by households consist among others of imports of consumer goods and the direct consumptive expenditure by Dutch residents abroad.
Final expenditure
The sum of the National final expenditure and the exports of goods and services. This variable is by definition equal to the disposable final expenditure (GDP and imports).
Total
National final expenditure
The sum of the consumption of households and the government, gross fixed capital formation and changes in inventories.
Total
Binnenlandse finale bestedingen die bestaan uit de consumptieve bestedingen van huishoudens en de overheid, de bruto investeringen in vaste activa (bruto) en de voorraadvorming.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that is households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By defnition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefor classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government ‘consumes its own production’. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Total
Households including NPISHs
Consumption expenditure by households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs). Not all expenses made by households are seen as consumptive, households may invest as well. These investments mainly concern the purchase of houses and substantial costs on maintenance. Small costs on maintenance, indoor painting and the purchase of furniture is classified as consumption. This also applies to the purchase of cars and car maintenance.
General government
Consumption expenditure by the general government sector. The output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the government. It is said that the government ‘consumes its own production’. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. Purchases by general government of goods and services produced by market producers that are supplied to households as social transfers in kind are part of government consumption as well. Examples of this in the Netherlands are ealth care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.

Government output consumed by the government is classified into collective consumption and individulisable consumption. Collective consumption by the government consists of services for collective consumption that are provided simultaneously to all members of the community. Examples of this are expenses on defense, environmental health or public governance. Individulisable consumption is made up of expenses that serve only part of the community. This concerns mainly education.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licences.

Total
Changes in inventories incl. valuables
Changes in inventories including acquisitions less disposals of valuables
Changes in the stock of raw materials, semifinished products, work-in-progress (unfunished works like ships or oil rigs) and finished products still held by the producer. Changes in stock do not include progress made in construction. Positive changes in inventories arise when products are finished in the reference period but not yet sold. Alternatively, they arise when goods are purchased for intermediate consumption but not yet used. Negative changes in inventories arise when goods from stocks have been sold, or used in the production process. A more extensive list of changes in inventories is found in article 3.146 and further of the European System of Accounts 2010.

In measuring changes in inventories, changes in prices during the reference period are not allowed to have any effect. The initial and final inventory is therefor valued at the same price. Raw materials are valued at the price of purchase. Final products are valued at the selling price. Work-in-progress is valued at the cost-price.

Acquisitions less disposals of valuables This transaction consists of the acquisitions less disposals of precious stones, non-monetary gold, antiques, art objects and jewellery, that are acquired and held primarily as stores of value. In the national accounts this transaction is mostly combined with changes in inventories.
Exports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Total
Exports of goods
Transactions in goods (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners. Part of the exports of goods are re-exports: goods that were imported before being exported, after having received at most minor adaptations.
Exports of services
Transactions in services (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. Exports of services include among others the following cases: transportation by resident carriers abroad, harbour services and ship maintenance to non-residents, works performed abroad by resident contractors. Expenses made in the Netherlands by foreign tourists, diplomats and cross-border workers.