Study migration from the Caribbean to the European Netherlands

© Staysly Goilo Photography
From 2013 up to and including 2017, a total of 392 young adults who were born in the former Netherlands Antilles or Aruba left the Caribbean Netherlands to stay in the European Netherlands. This is equivalent to nearly half of young people on the islands. Two-thirds of the group who moved to the European Netherlands migrated for study purposes. Relatively many study migrants who moved to the European Netherlands had parents with a high household income. This is reported by Statistics Netherlands (CBS) on the basis of the latest population and income data on the Caribbean Netherlands.

Reason for departure to the European Netherlands, 17 to 25-year-olds1), 2013-2017 (%)
RedenFor studyOther reason
Bonaire3015
Saba1715
St Eustatius5019
1) Born in the former Netherlands Antilles or Aruba.

From Bonaire to the European Netherlands

Between 2013 and 2017, a total of 306 young adults born in the former Netherlands Antilles or Aruba traded Bonaire for the European Netherlands. This is slightly less than half of this group of young people aged 17 to 25 years. Two-thirds of the young migrants who moved to the European Netherlands did so for education purposes. Those who crossed over to the Netherlands were more likely to have parents with a high household income than those who stayed on Bonaire. This was even more the case for young people who moved to the European Netherlands for education.

Household income of 17 to 25-year-olds1) who migrated from Bonaire to the European Netherlands, 2013-2017 (% of young people with high household income)
EmigratieShare
Total migrants62
Study migrants65
Not migrated51
1) Born in the former Netherlands Antilles or Aruba.

From St Eustatius to the European Netherlands

Between 2013 and 2017, 65 young adults aged 17 to 25 years born in the former Netherlands Antilles or Aruba moved from St Eustatius to the European Netherlands. This was 70 percent of that age group. Over two-thirds left to pursue education. Young study migrants who came to the European Netherlands to study were slightly more likely to have parents with a high household income than those who continued their stay on St Eustatius. This did not apply to the group who migrated to the European Netherlands for other reasons. It should be noted that St Eustatius has a relatively small number of young people.

Household income of 17 to 25-year-olds1) who migrated from St Eustatius to the European Netherlands, 2013-2017 (% of young people with high household income)
EmigratieShare
Total migrants46
Study migrants50
Not migrated48
1) Born in the Netherlands Antilles or Aruba.

From Saba to the European Netherlands

As for Saba, 21 young adults aged 17 to 25 years born in the former Netherlands Antilles or Aruba moved to the European Netherlands between 2013 and 2017. This is more than 30 percent in this age group. Of those who moved to the European Netherlands, more than half went to follow education. Young people who left for the European Netherlands to study were slightly more likely to have parents with a high household income than those who stayed on Saba. This did not apply to young adults who moved to the European Netherlands for other reasons. On Saba as well, the number of people in this age group is relatively small.

Household income of 17 to 25-year-olds1) who migrated from Saba to the European Netherlands, 2013-2017 (% of young people with high household income)
EmiShare
Total migrants71
Study migrants64
Not migrated50
1) Born in the Netherlands Antilles or Aruba.

Papiamentu

A Papiamentu translation of this news release can be obtained from Statistics Netherlands’ office on Bonaire by sending a request via email to: caribischnederland@cbs.nl.