Highly-educated young men more often unemployed than their female counterparts

15/07/2013 15:00

Unemployment among highly-educated 25 to 35-year-old men has increased significantly after 2009. Last year, more than 6 percent of them were unemployed. The rate was nearly twice as high as among highly-educated young women.

Unemployment growth among highly-educated young women slowing down

Until 2010, the unemployment rates for highly-educated men and women in the age category 25-35 were almost the same, i.e. approximately 3 percent for both groups in 2009. Since then, the rate among highly-educated young men has risen more rapidly than among highly-educated young women. Last year, 6.2 percent of highly-educated young men were unemployed versus 3.6 percent of women.

Unemployment among highly-educated 25 to 35-year-olds

Unemployment among highly-educated 25 to 35-year-olds

Unemployment growth among men across all academic disciplines

Highly-educated 25 to 35-year-olds have graduated relatively recently. Over the period 2010-2012, the unemployment rate has grown rather dramatically to more than 8 percent among male social sciences graduates, but fell marginally among female graduates. In other academic disciplines too, male unemployment has risen over the past three years. Female unemployment has risen somewhat faster in recent years among law graduates.

Unemployment among highly-educated 25 to 35-year-olds by various academic disciplines

Unemployment among highly-educated 25 to 35-year-olds by various academic disciplines

Unemployment rates almost the same for both genders in the 35 to 45-year-old population

Unemployment among highly-educated 35 to 45-year-old women has generally been higher in the past than among their male counterparts, but this has changed. Last year, unemployment rates were almost the same in both groups: the unemployment rates for highly-educated men and women in this age category were 3.5 and 3.7 percent respectively.

Unemployment among highly-educated 35 to 45-year-olds

Unemployment among highly-educated 35 to 45-year-olds

Robert de Vries