More male part-timers

22/01/2013 15:00

The number of men working on a part-time basis is growing. Early 2001, 12 percent of men had part-time jobs versus 17 percent in the third quarter of 2012. The number of part-timers has increased notably among 15 to 25-year-old men. 

Proportion of men working 20 to 35 hours has grown

In the third quarter of 2012, the employed labour force included over 4 million 15 to 25-year-old men. The majority of them (83 percent) were working on a full-time basis, i.e. 35 hours a week or more. However, the proportion of part-timers working 20 to 35 hours a week is increasing. Early 2001, 10 percent of employed men were working between 20 and 35 hours a week versus 14 percent today. Approximately 3 percent of employed men have part-time jobs of 12 to 20 hours a week. This proportion has been fairly stable over the years.

Male part-timers, employed labour force, quarterly figures

Male part-timers, employed labour force, quarterly figures

Nearly half of young men are working on part-time basis

The proportion of male part-timers has grown noticeably in the age category 15–25. The share of young men working on a part-time basis has risen from 30 percent to 46 percent between early 2001 and the third quarter of 2012. The share of part-timers has also risen among 25 to 55-year-old men, but with 12 percent in 2012, it remains relatively small. One in five over-55s are part-timers, the same ratio as in 2001.

Male part-timers by age, employed labour force

Male part-timers by age, employed labour force

Young men most often want to extend their working hours

The majority of male employees have no wish to change their working hours and this has hardly changed in recent years. Yet, the proportion who would like to work more has increased in all age categories and, at the same time, the proportion who want to reduce their working hours or stop working altogether has diminished. With 13 percent, the wish to work longer hours is most obvious among young employees. The proportion of employees who want to work shorter hours is highest among over-55s (12 percent).

Male employees who want to change their weekly working hours, employed labour force

Male employees who want to change their weekly working hours, employed labour force

Martine Mol