Current transactions by sectors; National Accounts

Table description


This table provides an overview of the non-financial transactions of the institutional sectors of the Dutch economy, distinguishing between uses and resources. Non-financial transactions consist of current transactions and transactions from the capital account. Furthermore, this table provides the main balancing items of the (sub)sectors.
Non-financial transactions are estimated for the main institutional sectors of the economy and the rest of the world.
Sectors are presented both consolidated and non-consolidated.

Data available from:
Annual figures from 1995.
Quarterly figures from first quarter 1999.

Status of the figures:
The figures from 1995 up to and including 2018 are final. Data of 2019, 2020 and 2021 are provisional.

Changes as of March 25th 2022:
Data on the fourth quarter of 2021 and annual data on 2021 are available. Data on the first three quarters of 2021 have been revised. Recently available quarterly an annual data from government finance statistics on 2020 have not been incorporated in the National Accounts. Therefore, data in publications of National Accounts and government finance statistics are not consistent. Differences will be resolved with the next publication date, June 24th 2022.

When will new figures be published?
Annual figures: Provisional data are published 6 months after the end of the reporting year. Final data are released 18 months after the end of the reporting year.
Quarterly figures: The first quarterly estimate is available 85 days after the end of each reporting quarter. The first quarter may be revised in September, the second quarter in December. Should further quarterly information become available thereafter, the estimates for the first three quarters may be revised in March. If (new) annual figures become available in June, the quarterly figures will be revised again to bring them in line with the annual figures.

Description topics

Resources
Resources are transactions add to the economic value of sectors.
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Other investment income
Other investment income consists of:
- investment income attributable to insurance policy holders
- investment income payable on pension entitlements
- investment income attributable to collective investment fund shareholders
Total
Investm. income attrib. to policy holder
In the national accounts pension and life insurance technical reserves are seen as a liability of insurance corporations to policy holders. Therefore, the investment revenues on these technical reserves are booked as payments from insurance corporations to households.
Subsequently, households pay back these revenues as imputed contributions to pension funds and life insurance corporations. In the financial accounts the latter transaction is recorded as a component of net equity in life insurance and pension funds technical reserves.
Income payable on pension entitlements
In the national accounts collective life insurance and pension provisions are seen as a liability of insurance enterprises and pension funds to pension participants. Therefore, the investment revenues on these provisions are booked as payments from insurance enterprises and pension funds to households.
Subsequently, households pay back these revenues as imputed premiums to insurance companies and pension funds.
Inv. income attributable to shareholders
Investment fund shareholders in a transaction recorded in the financial account.
Investment income attributable to collective investment fund shareholders, including mutual funds and unit trusts, consists of the following separate components:
— dividends attributable to collective investment fund shareholders
— retained earnings attributable to collective investment fund shareholders.

Dividends are a form of property income received by owners of shares to which they become entitled as a result of placing funds at the disposal of investments funds.
Reinvested earnings are equal to the operating surplus of the investment funds minus the dividends attributable to shareholders. Reinvested earnings are re-injected into the fund by a transaction recorded in the financial account.
Capital transfers
Capital transfers are payments for which no quid pro quo by the beneficiary is expected. They burden the wealth of the payer, or are meant to finance fixed capital formation or other long-term expenditures of the receiver. Capital transfers can be classified into capital taxes, investment grants, imputed capital transfers and other capital transfers.
Investment grants
Investment grants are capital transfers, which are intended to finance fixed capital formation of other units.
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Other investment income
Other investment income consists of:
- investment income attributable to insurance policy holders
- investment income payable on pension entitlements
- investment income attributable to collective investment fund shareholders
Total
Investm. income attrib. to policy holder
Investment income attributable to insurance policy holders corresponds to total primary incomes received from the investment of insurance technical reserves. The reserves are those where an insurance corporation recognises a corresponding liability to the policyholders.
In the national accounts pension and life insurance technical reserves are seen as a liability of insurance corporations to policy holders. Therefore, the investment revenues on these technical reserves are booked as payments from insurance corporations to households.
Subsequently, households pay back these revenues as imputed contributions to pension funds and life insurance corporations. In the financial accounts the latter transaction is recorded as a component of net equity in life insurance and pension funds technical reserves.

Income payable on pension entitlements
Investment income payable on pension entitlements. Pension entitlements arise from one of two different types of pension schemes. These are defined contribution schemes and defined benefit schemes.
A defined contribution scheme is one where contributions by both employers and employees are invested on behalf of the employees as future pensioners. No other source of funding of pensions is available and no other use is made of the funds. The investment income payable on defined contribution entitlements is equal to the investment income on the funds plus any income earned by renting land or buildings owned by the fund.
The characteristic of a defined benefit scheme is that a formula is used to determine the level of payments to be made to pensioners. This characteristic makes it possible to determine the level of entitlements as the present value of all future payments, calculated using actuarial assumptions about life lengths and economic assumptions about the interest or discount rate. The present value of the entitlements existing at the start of the year increases because the date when the entitlements become payable is one year nearer. This increase is regarded as investment income attributed to the pension holders in the case of defined benefit scheme. The amount of the increase is neither affected by whether the pension scheme actually has sufficient funds to meet all the obligations nor by the type of increase in the funds, whether it is investment income or holding gains, for example.
Inv. income attributable to shareholders
Investment income attributable to collective investment fund shareholders, including mutual funds and unit trusts, consists of the following separate components:
- dividends attributable to collective investment fund shareholders
- retained earnings attributable to collective investment fund shareholders
The dividend component is recorded in exactly the same manner as dividends for individual corporations, as described above. The retained earnings component is recorded using the same principles as those described for foreign direct investment enterprises but is calculated excluding any reinvested earnings on foreign direct investment. The remaining retained earnings are attributed to the investment fund shareholders leaving the investment fund with no saving, and are re-injected into the fund by the investment fund shareholders in a transaction recorded in the financial account.
Capital transfers
Capital transfers are payments for which no quid pro quo by the beneficiary is expected. They burden the wealth of the payer, or are meant to finance fixed capital formation or other long-term expenditures of the receiver. Capital transfers can be classified into capital taxes, investment grants, imputed capital transfers and other capital transfers.
Investment grants
Investment grants are capital transfers, which are intended to finance fixed capital formation of other units.