Key figures by sector; National Accounts

Table description


This table presents a number of key figures of the sector accounts. These main indicators provide the most important information on the total economy and on the main institutional sectors of the economy: non-financial corporations, financial corporations, general government, households including non-profit institutions serving households and the rest of the world.

Data available from:
Annual figures from 1995.
Quarterly figures from first quarter 1999.

Status of the figures:
The figures from 1995 up to and including 2017 are final. Data of 2018, 2019 and 2020 are provisional.

Changes as of September 23rd, 2020:
Data on the second quarter of 2020 heve been added to this table.

When will new figures be published?
Annual figures: Provisional data are published 6 months after the end of the reporting year. Final data are released 18 months after the end of the reporting year.
Quarterly figures: The first quarterly estimate is available 85 days after the end of each reporting quarter. The first quarter may be revised in September, the second quarter in December. Should further quarterly information become available thereafter, the estimates for the first three quarters may be revised in March. If (new) annual figures become available in June, the quarterly figures will be revised again to bring them in line with the annual figures.

Description topics

Total domestic sectors
The domestic sectors consist of non-financial corporations, financial corporations, general government, households and non-profit institutions (NPI) serving households. The breakdown into institutional sectors is based on international rules.
Consumption of fixed capital
The decline in value of fixed assets owned, as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence.

For the estimation of the consumption of fixed capital the perpetual inventory method (PIM) is applied. The capital stock at the beginning of the year is brought to replacement value because of price changes. The fixed capital formation during the year is added to this capital stock. Next it is diminished with the value of capital goods discarded. This gives to value of capital stock at the end of the year. The consumption of fixed obtained by applying a depreciation percentage.
This method may differ considerably from the method used to calculate depreciation in business accounts, which is based on historical costs or fiscal life span.

Households including NPISHs
Households including non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH)

The households sector consists of individuals or groups of individuals as consumers and as entrepreneurs producing market goods and non-financial and financial services (market producers) provided that the production of goods and services is not by separate entities treated as quasi-corporations. It also includes individuals or groups of individuals as producers of goods and non-financial services for exclusively own final use.
The sector households includes all natural persons who are resident for more than one year in the Netherlands, irrespective of their nationality. On the other hand Dutch citizens who stay abroad for longer than one year do not belong to the Dutch sector households.
The sector households does not only cover independently living persons, but also persons in nursing homes, old people's homes, prisons, boarding schools, etc. If persons are entrepreneurs, their business also belongs to the sector households. This is the case for self-employed persons (one-man business). Large autonomous unincorporated enterprises (quasi-corporations) are included in the sector non-financial or financial corporations.

The non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) sector consists of non-profit institutions which are separate legal entities, which serve households and which are private non-market producers. Their principal resources are voluntary contributions in cash or in kind from households in their capacity as consumers, from payments made by general government and from property income.
Examples are religious organisations, charity organisations, political parties, trade unions and cultural, sports and recreational organisations.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that is households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.