Financial corporations; balance sheet 1998-2016

Financial corporations; balance sheet 1998-2016

Financial corporations Periods Assets Total assets (mln euro) Assets Monetary gold (mln euro) Assets Special Drawing Rights (SDR's) (mln euro) Assets Currency and transferable deposits (mln euro) Assets Other deposits (mln euro) Assets Short-term securities (mln euro) Assets Long-term securities (mln euro) Assets Short-term loans (mln euro) Assets Long-term loans (mln euro) Assets Mortgage loans (mln euro) Assets Equity and shares (mln euro) Assets Ins., pension and st. guarantee sch (mln euro) Assets Financial derivatives (mln euro) Assets Other accounts receivable/payable (mln euro) Assets Property (mln euro) Assets Other assets (mln euro) Liabilities Total liabilities (mln euro) Liabilities Special Drawing Rights (SDR's) (mln euro) Liabilities Currency (mln euro) Liabilities Transferable deposits (mln euro) Liabilities Savings deposits (mln euro) Liabilities Other deposits (mln euro) Liabilities Short-term securities (mln euro) Liabilities Long-term securities (mln euro) Liabilities Short-term loans (mln euro) Liabilities Long-term loans (mln euro) Liabilities Equity and shares (mln euro) Liabilities Ins., pension and st. guarantee sch (mln euro) Liabilities Financial derivatives (mln euro) Liabilities Other accounts receivable/payable (mln euro) Liabilities Net worth (mln euro)
Total financial corporations 2014 9,648,665 19,450 5,448 253,482 560,147 42,636 1,136,150 1,001,701 2,138,929 . 4,148,365 32,427 124,606 139,264 45,615 445 9,648,665 5,769 54,053 581,247 344,578 568,237 97,002 1,277,780 675,641 783,386 3,489,513 1,449,560 41,081 232,704 48,114
Total financial corporations 2015 9,962,370 19,164 6,002 326,726 596,228 34,567 1,172,588 975,669 2,159,364 . 4,373,990 31,654 87,138 131,839 47,018 423 9,962,370 6,158 57,295 670,894 350,569 600,478 96,438 1,247,254 629,322 855,033 3,682,182 1,509,809 24,387 217,028 15,523
Total financial corporations 2016* 10,446,142 21,622 5,718 355,882 652,028 44,234 1,228,403 951,857 2,226,653 . 4,637,888 26,563 103,727 142,207 48,999 361 10,446,142 6,167 59,534 758,109 355,464 634,450 100,928 1,250,154 651,395 855,102 3,921,261 1,648,471 31,247 198,879 -25,019
Institutional investors 2014 2,482,132 26,031 9,897 7,942 732,904 52,739 116,936 . 1,342,493 30,539 79,252 41,792 41,228 379 2,482,132 413 3,488 47,023 14,056 778,755 1,449,560 1,145 95,287 92,405
Institutional investors 2015 2,493,255 25,151 8,423 8,866 751,646 45,665 127,855 . 1,364,508 30,103 51,749 36,255 42,684 350 2,493,255 41 1,336 39,727 12,937 796,017 1,509,809 399 83,692 49,297
Institutional investors 2016* 2,687,787 26,464 10,632 13,052 778,583 49,377 140,968 . 1,503,195 25,427 52,711 42,198 44,900 280 2,687,787 41 1,393 44,198 13,405 866,870 1,648,471 324 71,334 41,751
Monetary financial institutions 2014 2,294,354 19,450 5,448 93,783 344,682 15,701 363,223 420,840 960,956 . 82,863 553 -23,263 5,665 4,387 66 2,294,354 5,769 54,053 581,247 344,578 568,237 74,177 462,281 0 56,021 121,742 9,703 30,468 -13,922
Monetary financial institutions 2015 2,434,522 19,164 6,002 162,616 391,481 11,791 374,304 395,723 988,338 . 87,499 257 -14,143 7,083 4,334 73 2,434,522 6,158 57,295 670,894 350,569 600,478 66,407 470,728 0 53,581 129,114 7,418 27,489 -5,609
Monetary financial institutions 2016* 2,548,570 21,622 5,718 194,804 435,813 13,769 399,146 389,739 1,004,465 . 85,948 0 -13,518 6,884 4,099 81 2,548,570 6,167 59,534 758,109 355,464 634,450 62,232 464,667 0 51,510 131,827 6,792 19,214 -1,396
Captive institutions and money lenders 2014 3,921,815 49,509 36,780 12,368 8,131 448,762 738,868 . 2,511,056 0 78,601 37,740 . . 3,921,815 21,018 476,138 482,408 493,045 2,450,122 21,465 71,643 -94,024
Captive institutions and money lenders 2015 4,139,539 48,814 26,624 10,771 10,875 469,193 761,320 . 2,720,116 0 53,083 38,743 . . 4,139,539 28,613 482,145 459,139 571,748 2,606,358 7,489 78,706 -94,659
Captive institutions and money lenders 2016* 4,317,318 55,142 28,333 11,438 11,429 444,558 824,677 . 2,839,747 0 60,856 41,138 . . 4,317,318 37,039 511,352 484,049 570,886 2,763,961 11,491 76,906 -138,366
Other financial intermediaries 2014 950,364 84,159 168,788 6,625 31,892 79,360 322,169 . 211,953 1,335 -9,984 54,067 . . 950,364 1,394 335,873 146,210 220,264 138,894 0 8,768 35,306 63,655
Other financial intermediaries 2015 895,054 90,145 169,700 3,139 35,763 65,088 281,851 . 201,867 1,294 -3,551 49,758 . . 895,054 1,377 293,045 130,456 216,767 150,693 0 9,081 27,141 66,494
Other financial intermediaries 2016* 892,467 79,472 177,250 5,975 39,245 68,183 256,543 . 208,998 1,136 3,678 51,987 . . 892,467 1,616 272,742 123,148 219,301 158,603 0 12,640 31,425 72,992
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table consists of the balance sheet of financial corporations. It enables to compare institutional investors with monetary financial institutions, captive financial institutions and money lenders and other financial intermediaries and financial auxiliaries.

Data available yearly figures from 1998 to 2016.

Status of the figures:
Figures up to 2015 are definitive, figures for 2016 are provisional.
Because this table is discontinued, figures will not be updated anymore.

Changes as of 7 September 2018:
None, this table is discontinued.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore.
The strategic alliance between Statistics Netherlands (CBS) and the Dutch Central Bank (DNB) has led to a reallocation of tasks between the two institutions. Institutional investors is now part of the dominion of DNB. Publication of tables on institutional investors by the CBS is discontinued. DNB provides the OECD with figures for its statistic Institutional investors. See paragraph 3 for links to the websites of DNB and OECD.

Description topics

Assets
Total assets
Monetary gold
Monetary gold includes all gold, which is not intended for industrial purposes and not held in the form of valuables. Monetary gold can only be held by the Dutch Central Bank (DNB).
Special Drawing Rights (SDR's)
SDRs are international reserve assets created by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and which are allocated to its members to supplement existing reserve assets. This transaction only exists for DNB.
Currency and transferable deposits
Currency consists of notes and coins in circulation that are commonly used to make payments. Transferable deposits are deposits exchangeable for currency on demand, at par, and which are directly usable for making payments by cheque, draft, giro order, direct debit/credit, or other direct payment facilities, without penalty or restriction.
Other deposits
Other deposits include all deposits in euros and foreign currency at any resident and non-resident bank (except for saving deposits in euro's), which are not immediately transferable without restrictions.
Short-term securities
Short-term securities include all securities with a maximum term of one year, which in principle are transferable against a price that has been fixed in advance. Usually, the obliged interest payments of the debtor have been discounted in the value. 'Transferable' means that assets can be converted into cash from, or on a date that has been appointed at the moment the bond was issued. This transaction covers treasury paper issued by both the Dutch government and foreign governments, saving certificates to bearer and transferable certificates of deposits, issued by banks.
Long-term securities
Long-term securities include all transferable securities, which generally do not mature within one year. They are usually quoted at the stock exchange. The interest on long-term bonds is made payable through coupons. Mortgage bonds, notes issued by banks and convertible bonds as long as they have not been converted into shares, also belong to this type of assets.
Short-term loans
Short-term loans are all credits, which do not have the characteristics of deposits and which mature by contract within one year. Included are short-term loans from financial institutions, balances on current accounts (except transferable deposits), short-term consumer credit, bills (of exchange) and promissory notes.
Long-term loans
Long-term loans are all credits, which do not have the characteristics of deposits and which do not mature within one year. They mainly concern long-term loans on obligations, mortgage loans and long-term consumer credit. As from 2008 after revision mortgage loans are part of long-term loans.
Mortgage loans
Loans secured by property. As from 2008 after revision mortgage loans are part of long-term loans.
Equity and shares
Equity and investment fund shares or units. Equity and investment fund shares or units are claims, which are -fully, or partly- entitled to a share in profits or in the own funds in case of liquidation. Included is the value of capital formation by the government in public enterprises (quasi-corporations) that belong to the government.
Equity and investment fund shares or units are residual claims on the assets of the institutional units that issued the shares or units. Included is the value of capital formation by the government in public enterprises (quasi-corporations) that belong to the government.
Equity and investment fund shares or units include:
- listed shares
- unlisted shares
- other equity
- investment fund shares or units.
Ins., pension and st. guarantee sch
Insurance, pension and standardised guarantee schemes exists of six subcategories:
(a) non-life insurance technical reserves;
(b) life insurance and annuity entitlements;
(c) pension entitlements;
(d) claims of pension funds on pension managers;
(e) entitlements to non-pension benefits ; and
(f) provisions for calls under standardised guarantees.
Non-life insurance technical reserves: Non-life insurance technical reserves are financial claims that non-life insurance policy holders have against non-life insurance corporations in respect of unearned premiums and claims incurred.
Life insurance and annuity entitlements: Life insurance and annuity entitlements consist of financial claims that life insurance policy holders and beneficiaries of annuities have against corporations providing life insurance.
Pension entitlements: Pension entitlements comprise financial claims that current employees and former employees hold against either:
(a) their employers;
(b) a scheme designated by the employer to pay pensions as part of a compensation agreement between the employer and the employee; or
(c) an insurer.
Claims of pension funds on pension managers and entitlements to non-pension benefits. For the Netherlands this category only relates to claims of pension funds on pension managers, entitlements to non-pension benefits don't occur here. The claims of pension funds on pension managers are only applicable to corporate pension plans with defined benefit schemes. The positive and negative reserves are attributed to employers and not to the employees.

Provisions for calls under standardised guarantees are financial claims that holders of standardised guarantees have against institutional units providing them. Provisions relating to calls under standardised guarantees are prepayments of net fees and provisions to meet outstanding calls under standardised guarantees. Like provisions for prepaid insurance premiums and reserves, provisions for calls under standardised guarantees include unearned fees (premiums) and calls (claims) not yet settled. Standardised guarantees are guarantees that are issued in large numbers, usually for fairly small amounts, along identical lines. Such arrangements involve three parties: the borrower, the lender and the guarantor. Either the borrower or the lender may contract with the guarantor to repay the lender if the borrower defaults. Examples are export credit guarantees and student loan guarantees.
Financial derivatives
Financial derivatives are financial instruments linked to a specified financial instrument or indicator or commodity, through which specific financial risks can be traded in financial markets in their own right. Financial derivatives meet the following conditions:
(a) they are linked to a financial or non-financial asset, to a group of assets, or to an index;
(b) they are either negotiable or can be offset on the market; and
(c) no principal amount is advanced to be repaid.
The financial derivatives include options and forwards (warrants, futures, swaps and forward rate agreements). Forwards are recorded net on the assets side of the balance sheets, financial transactions and other changes, meaning that no liabilities are presented but only net assets. The outstanding positions can therefore have a negative value.
Other accounts receivable/payable
The transactions in the sector accounts are mainly recorded at a moment that does not coincide with the moment the transaction is completed. These time differences cause changes in assets and liabilities, which are recorded in the transaction 'other accounts receivable and payable'.
For example, sales are recorded at the moment of delivery. At that moment, a claim of the supplier on the buyer (supplier's credit) arises, which is nullified when the buyer pays. Other examples are payments in advance on deliveries (buyer's credit) and due payments or receipts of wages and salaries, interests, contributions etc.
Property
Property consists of houses, offices, shops, rural estates and other (parking lots, factory buildings, holiday parks).
Other assets
Capital equipments such as inventory and stocks.
Liabilities
Total liabilities
Special Drawing Rights (SDR's)
SDRs are international reserve assets created by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and which are allocated to its members to supplement existing reserve assets. This transaction only exists for DNB.
Currency
Currency consists of notes and coins in circulation that are commonly used to make payments.
Transferable deposits
Transferable deposits are deposits exchangeable for currency on demand, at par, and which are directly usable for making payments by cheque, draft, giro order, direct debit/credit, or other direct payment facilities, without penalty or restriction.
Savings deposits
These deposits include all deposits in euros and foreign currency of both residents and non-residents in the form of normal saving accounts, fixed saving accounts, premium saving accounts and fixed-term saving accounts.
Other deposits
Other deposits include all deposits in euro's and foreign currency at any resident and non-resident bank (except for saving deposits in euro's), which are not immediately transferable without restrictions.
Short-term securities
Short-term securities include all securities with a maximum term of one year, which in principle are transferable against a price that has been fixed in advance. Usually, the obliged interest payments of the debtor have been discounted in the value. 'Transferable' means that assets can be converted into cash from, or on a date that has been appointed at the moment the bond was issued. This transaction covers treasury paper issued by both the Dutch government and foreign governments, saving certificates to bearer and transferable certificates of deposits, issued by banks.
Long-term securities
Long-term securities include all transferable securities, which generally do not mature within one year. They are usually quoted at the stock exchange. The interest on long-term bonds is made payable through coupons. Mortgage bonds, notes issued by banks and convertible bonds as long as they have not been converted into shares, also belong to this type of assets.
Short-term loans
Short-term loans are all credits, which do not have the characteristics of deposits and which mature by contract within one year. Included are short-term loans from financial institutions, balances on current accounts (except transferable deposits), short-term consumer credit, bills (of exchange) and promissory notes.
Long-term loans
Long-term loans are all credits, which do not have the characteristics of deposits and which do not mature within one year. They mainly concern long-term loans on obligations, mortgage loans and long-term consumer credit. As from 2008 after revision mortgage loans are part of long-term loans.
Equity and shares
Equity and investment fund shares or units. Equity and investment fund shares or units are claims, which are -fully, or partly- entitled to a share in profits or in the own funds in case of liquidation. Included is the value of capital formation by the government in public enterprises (quasi-corporations) that belong to the government.
Equity and investment fund shares or units are residual claims on the assets of the institutional units that issued the shares or units. Included is the value of capital formation by the government in public enterprises (quasi-corporations) that belong to the government.
Equity and investment fund shares or units include:
- listed shares
- unlisted shares
- other equity
- investment fund shares or units.
Ins., pension and st. guarantee sch
Insurance, pension and standardised guarantee schemes exists of six subcategories:
(a) non-life insurance technical reserves;
(b) life insurance and annuity entitlements;
(c) pension entitlements;
(d) claims of pension funds on pension managers;
(e) entitlements to non-pension benefits; and
(f) provisions for calls under standardised guarantees.
Non-life insurance technical reserves: Non-life insurance technical reserves are financial claims that non-life insurance policy holders have against non-life insurance corporations in respect of unearned premiums and claims incurred.
Life insurance and annuity entitlements: Life insurance and annuity entitlements consist of financial claims that life insurance policy holders and beneficiaries of annuities have against corporations providing life insurance.
Pension entitlements: Pension entitlements comprise financial claims that current employees and former employees hold against either:
(a) their employers;
(b) a scheme designated by the employer to pay pensions as part of a compensation agreement between the employer and the employee; or
(c) an insurer.
Claims of pension funds on pension managers and entitlements to non-pension benefits. For the Netherlands this category only relates to claims of pension funds on pension managers, entitlements to non-pension benefits don't occur here. The claims of pension funds on pension managers are only applicable to corporate pension plans with defined benefit schemes. The positive and negative reserves are attributed to employers and not to the employees.

Provisions for calls under standardised guarantees are financial claims that holders of standardised guarantees have against institutional units providing them. Provisions relating to calls under standardised guarantees are prepayments of net fees and provisions to meet outstanding calls under standardised guarantees. Like provisions for prepaid insurance premiums and reserves, provisions for calls under standardised guarantees include unearned fees (premiums) and calls (claims) not yet settled. Standardised guarantees are guarantees that are issued in large numbers, usually for fairly small amounts, along identical lines. Such arrangements involve three parties: the borrower, the lender and the guarantor. Either the borrower or the lender may contract with the guarantor to repay the lender if the borrower defaults. Examples are export credit guarantees and student loan guarantees.
Financial derivatives
Financial derivatives are financial instruments linked to a specified financial instrument or indicator or commodity, through which specific financial risks can be traded in financial markets in their own right. Financial derivatives meet the following conditions:
(a) they are linked to a financial or non-financial asset, to a group of assets, or to an index;
(b) they are either negotiable or can be offset on the market; and
(c) no principal amount is advanced to be repaid.
The financial derivatives include options and forwards (warrants, futures, swaps and forward rate agreements). Forwards are recorded net on the assets side of the balance sheets, financial transactions and other changes, meaning that no liabilities are presented but only net assets. The outstanding positions can therefore have a negative value.
Other accounts receivable/payable
The transactions in the sector accounts are mainly recorded at a moment that does not coincide with the moment the transaction is completed. These time differences cause changes in assets and liabilities, which are recorded in the transaction 'other accounts receivable and payable'.
For example, sales are recorded at the moment of delivery. At that moment, a claim of the supplier on the buyer (supplier's credit) arises, which is nullified when the buyer pays. Other examples are payments in advance on deliveries (buyer's credit) and due payments or receipts of wages and salaries, interests, contributions etc.
Net worth
The value of the total assets minus total liabilities.