Sector accounts; current transactions by sectors 1969- q4 2013

Sector accounts; current transactions by sectors 1969- q4 2013

Sectors Periods Resources Total (mln euro) Resources Output Total (mln euro) Resources Property income Total (mln euro) Uses Total (mln euro) Uses Compensation of employees Total (mln euro) Uses Final consumption expenditure Total (mln euro) Balancing items Gross domestic product / value added (mln euro) Balancing items Gross operating surplus / mixed income (mln euro) Balancing items Gross national income / primary income (mln euro) Balancing items Gross disposable income (mln euro) Balancing items Gross saving (mln euro)
Total economy 2013 4th quarter* 594,697 305,838 67,312 600,686 77,793 112,953 156,512 60,204 154,704 151,559 38,588
Total economy 2013* 2,338,303 1,185,061 276,328 2,355,599 310,505 443,784 602,658 227,390 599,909 588,780 144,947
Non-financial corporations 2013 4th quarter* 227,100 212,530 12,845 214,717 53,006 - 87,964 34,371 30,699 28,072 28,072
Non-financial corporations 2013* 887,977 827,714 50,801 841,590 213,324 - 341,509 128,231 110,323 98,819 98,819
Financial corporations 2013 4th quarter* 72,330 20,103 39,709 72,128 3,807 - 10,971 6,521 1,361 4,103 -9
Financial corporations 2013* 296,643 80,755 163,977 290,681 17,025 - 44,895 27,040 11,211 25,938 7,778
General government (consolidated) 2013 4th quarter* 99,123 32,461 4,734 102,325 15,463 44,692 19,883 4,386 24,654 46,499 1,807
General government (consolidated) 2013* 376,555 120,837 20,396 391,315 57,474 170,324 74,617 17,133 90,036 173,282 2,958
General government 2013 4th quarter* 126,348 32,461 4,776 129,550 15,463 44,692 19,883 4,386 24,654 46,499 1,807
General government 2013* 481,642 120,837 20,596 496,402 57,474 170,324 74,617 17,133 90,036 173,282 2,958
Households including NPISH 2013 4th quarter* 167,770 40,744 9,982 166,638 5,517 68,261 21,190 14,926 97,990 72,885 8,718
Households including NPISH 2013* 672,624 155,755 40,954 664,546 22,682 273,460 78,674 54,986 388,339 290,741 35,392
Rest of the world 2013 4th quarter* 166,819 - 38,748 177,334 240 - . . . . .
Rest of the world 2013* 661,531 - 157,725 707,198 989 - . . . . .
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table provides an overview of the non-financial transactions of the institutional sectors of the Dutch economy, distinguishing between uses and resources. Non-financial transactions consist of current transactions and transactions from the capital account. Furthermore, this table provides the main balancing items of the (sub)sectors.
Non-financial transactions are estimated for the main institutional sectors of the economy and the rest of the world. The main institutional sectors of the economy are non-financial corporations, financial corporations, general government, households and non-profit institutions serving households. A breakdown into subsectors is provided for financial corporations and general government sectors.

Data available from:
Years from 1969 to 2013
Quarters from first quarter 2005 to fourth quarter 2013.

Status of the figures:
The figures concerning 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 are (revised) provisional. Because this table is discontinued, figures will not be updated anymore.

Changes as of June 25th 2014:
None, this table is discontinued.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore.
This table is replaced by table Sector accounts; current transactions by sectors. See paragraph 3.

Description topics

Resources
Revenue of institutional sectors.
Total
Revenue of institutional sectors.
Output
Output covers the value of all goods produced for sale, including unsold goods, and all receipts of services rendered. Output furthermore covers the market equivalent of goods and services produced for own use, such as own account capital formation, services of owner-occupied dwellings and agricultural products produced by farmers for own consumption. The output of such goods is estimated by valuing the quantities produced against the price that the producer would have received if these goods had been sold.
Output is valued at basic prices, defined as the price received by the producer excluding trade and transport margins and the balance of taxes and subsidies on products. This is the price the producer is ultimately left with.
Total
Output covers the value of all goods produced for sale, including unsold goods, and all receipts of services rendered. Output furthermore covers the market equivalent of goods and services produced for own use, such as own account capital formation, services of owner-occupied dwellings and agricultural products produced by farmers for own consumption. The output of such goods is estimated by valuing the quantities produced against the price that the producer would have received if these goods had been sold.
Output is valued at basic prices, defined as the price received by the producer excluding trade and transport margins and the balance of taxes and subsidies on products. This is the price the producer is ultimately left with.
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Property income consists of: interest, distributed income of corporations (dividends and withdrawals from income of quasi-corporations), reinvested earnings on direct foreign investments, property income attributed to insurance policy holders and rents on land and subsoil assets.
Total
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Property income consists of: interest, distributed income of corporations (dividends and withdrawals from income of quasi-corporations), reinvested earnings on direct foreign investments, property income attributed to insurance policy holders and rents on land and subsoil assets.
Uses
Expenditure by institutional sectors.
Total
Expenditure by institutional sectors.
Compensation of employees
Compensation of employees is the total remuneration paid by employers to their employees in return for work done. Employees are all residents and non-residents working in a paid job. Managing directors of limited companies are considered to be employees; therefore their salaries are also included in the compensation of employees. The same holds for people working in sheltered workshops.
Compensation of employees is classified in wages and salaries and employers' social contributions:

Wages and salaries include income taxes and employees’ social contributions even if they are actually withheld by the employer and paid directly to tax authorities, social security schemes and pension schemes.
Wages include payments that are periodically and directly paid to employees. Besides they contain extras (such as bonuses, overtime pay, tips, commission), wages in kind (such as free housing, free food, ‘company car’, day nursery, lower interest rates on mortgages, free travel (or at reduced prices) and holiday allowances. Furthermore, certain refunds for costs made by the employee, such as travel expenses to and from work, are included as well.

Employers’ social contributions consist of payments to insurers made by employers for the benefit of their employees. They can be classified in employers' social security contributions, employers' private social contributions (of which pension schemes) and the imputed social contributions.
In most cases the employers directly pay the employers’ social contributions to the insurers. However, to show that these contributions are paid for the benefit of employees, these payments are recorded as two transactions: a) employers pay employers’ social contributions to their employees, and b) employees pay the same contributions to social insurance funds.
Total
Compensation of employees is the total remuneration paid by employers to their employees in return for work done. Employees are all residents and non-residents working in a paid job. Managing directors of limited companies are considered to be employees; therefore their salaries are also included in the compensation of employees. The same holds for people working in sheltered workshops.
Compensation of employees is classified in wages and salaries and employers' social contributions:

Wages and salaries include income taxes and employees’ social contributions even if they are actually withheld by the employer and paid directly to tax authorities, social security schemes and pension schemes.
Wages include payments that are periodically and directly paid to employees. Besides they contain extras (such as bonuses, overtime pay, tips, commission), wages in kind (such as free housing, free food, ‘company car’, day nursery, lower interest rates on mortgages, free travel (or at reduced prices) and holiday allowances. Furthermore, certain refunds for costs made by the employee, such as travel expenses to and from work, are included as well.

Employers’ social contributions consist of payments to insurers made by employers for the benefit of their employees. They can be classified in employers' social security contributions, employers' private social contributions (of which pension schemes) and the imputed social contributions.
In most cases the employers directly pay the employers’ social contributions to the insurers. However, to show that these contributions are paid for the benefit of employees, these payments are recorded as two transactions: a) employers pay employers’ social contributions to their employees, and b) employees pay the same contributions to social insurance funds.
Final consumption expenditure
Final consumption expenditure consists of expenditure incurred by resident institutional units on goods and services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs or wants or the collective needs of members of the community. Final consumption expenditure may take place on the domestic territory or abroad.
Final consumption expenditure exists only for households, NPI households and general government.

Total
Final consumption expenditure consists of expenditure incurred by resident institutional units on goods and services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs or wants or the collective needs of members of the community. Final consumption expenditure may take place on the domestic territory or abroad.
Final consumption expenditure exists only for households, NPI households and general government.
Balancing items
Main macroeconomic balancing items by sectors
Gross domestic product / value added
Value added (basic prices) per sector is equal to the difference between the production (basic prices) and intermediate consumption (purchasers' prices). Gross domestic product (GDP) is equal to the value added at basic prices of all sectors together plus some transactions which cannot be attributed to sectors. The undistributed transaction consists of taxes less subsidies on products. GDP is also equal to the value of the income generated in the Netherlands.

Gross operating surplus / mixed income
Gross operating surplus is the balance that remains after deducting the compensation of employees and the balance of other taxes and subsidies on production from the value added. The operating surplus of family enterprises is called mixed income, because it also contains compensation for work by the owners and their family members.
The operating surplus of the total economy is the sum of all operating surplus or mixed income of institutional sectors.
Gross national income / primary income
The primary income (national income) is the income that institutional sectors receive for their direct participation in the production process and the income that they receive in exchange for the provision of financial resources, land etc. National income is the sum of GDP and net primary income from the rest of the world. It can also be calculated as the sum of the primary income of all sectors together (total economy).
Gross disposable income
Disposable income is the balancing item of the secondary distribution of income account. It shows for each institutional sector its disposable income, which remains after the redistribution of primary income by compulsory or non-compulsory current transfers between the institutional sectors. Total disposable income of all resident units is called disposable national income, which is equal to national income plus net current transfers received from the rest of the world.


Gross saving
Saving is the difference between disposable income and final consumption expenditure, adjusted for net equity in pension funds reserves.