Sector accounts key figures 1969-q4 2013

Sector accounts key figures 1969-q4 2013

Periods Total economy Gross domestic product (mln euro) Total economy Consumption of fixed capital (mln euro) Total economy Net operating surplus / mixed income (mln euro) Total economy Net national income (mln euro) Total economy Net disposable national income (mln euro) Total economy Net national saving (mln euro) Total economy Gross fixed capital formation (mln euro) Total economy Net lending (+) or net borrowing (-) (mln euro) Total economy Changes in financial net worth (mln euro) Total economy Labour input of employed persons (1000 full-time equivalent jobs) Non-financial corporations Output (mln euro) Non-financial corporations Gross value added (mln euro) Non-financial corporations Net operating surplus (mln euro) Non-financial corporations Net profits before taxes (mln euro) Non-financial corporations Profit ratio (% value added) Non-financial corporations Gross fixed capital formation (mln euro) Non-financial corporations Capital formation ratio (% value added) Non-financial corporations Labour input of employees (1000 full-time equivalent jobs) Financial corporations Gross value added (mln euro) Financial corporations Net profits before taxes (mln euro) Financial corporations Financial assets (mln euro) Financial corporations Net lending to private sector (mln euro) Financial corporations Lending to private sector, end of period (mln euro) Financial corporations Labour input of employees (1000 full-time equivalent jobs) General government (consolidated) Total revenue (% GDP) General government (consolidated) Taxes and social security contributions (% GDP) General government (consolidated) Total expenditure (% GDP) General government (consolidated) EDP-debt (% GDP) General government (consolidated) EDP-deficit (% GDP) General government (consolidated) Labour input of employees (1000 full-time equivalent jobs) Households including NPISH Net mixed income (mln euro) Households including NPISH Net disposable income (mln euro) Households including NPISH Net real disposable income (% changes moving annual totals) Households including NPISH Final consumption expenditure (mln euro) Households including NPISH Free / individual savings (mln euro) Households including NPISH Savings ratio (% disposable income) Households including NPISH Gross fixed capital formation (mln euro) Households including NPISH Households' capital formation ratio (% disposable income) Households including NPISH Financial assets Total (mln euro) Households including NPISH Financial assets Savings deposits and other deposits (mln euro) Households including NPISH Financial assets Shares and other equities (mln euro) Households including NPISH Financial assets Net equity in life insurance reserves (mln euro) Households including NPISH Financial assets Net equity in pension funds reserves (mln euro) Households including NPISH Liabilities Total (mln euro) Households including NPISH Liabilities Home mortgages; closing balance (mln euro) Households including NPISH Home mortgages; net lending (mln euro) Households including NPISH Labour input of employees (1000 full-time equivalent jobs) Households including NPISH Labour input of self-employed persons (1000 full-time equivalent jobs) Rest of the world Net exports share (% GDP) Rest of the world Net exports (mln euro) Rest of the world Net primary income abroad (mln euro) Rest of the world Net current transfers abroad (mln euro) Rest of the world Net capital transfers abroad (mln euro)
2011** 599,047 88,944 141,340 512,020 502,852 63,841 108,530 42,194 43,987 6,753.0 829,170 338,359 85,443 114,017 38.9 53,007 15.2 4,134.2 41,214 112,258 7,370,395 9,116 1,004,357 216.0 45.6 38.1 49.9 65.7 -4.3 1,080.8 37,059 267,646 -0.4 271,763 -4,117 11.6 31,194 10.1 1,831,526 329,448 222,458 202,834 902,065 808,612 671,182 14,345 478.9 843.2 8.6 51,424 1,917 -9,168 -2,061
2012 1st quarter* 149,221 21,875 40,665 131,687 128,344 19,313 25,607 14,995 15,152 . 212,824 86,009 25,708 31,221 43.3 13,084 15.1 . 11,089 21,419 7,525,853 2,451 1,006,047 . 45.7 38.1 50.0 66.7 -4.3 . 9,176 60,075 -1.3 68,762 -8,687 3.2 6,900 9.8 1,888,573 337,839 228,753 207,524 940,084 825,279 671,577 449 . . 9.8 14,585 4,341 -3,343 -586
2012 2nd quarter* 152,300 22,127 25,709 129,132 126,851 14,438 27,602 8,464 8,421 . 209,339 85,116 13,038 19,283 28.7 14,349 17.0 . 11,139 22,452 7,567,561 5,404 1,011,608 . 46.0 38.3 50.0 68.4 -4.1 . 7,965 81,077 -2.6 67,950 13,127 25.2 6,987 7.7 1,912,224 344,263 223,275 209,214 957,229 823,657 673,614 2,103 . . 8.1 12,275 -1,041 -2,281 -499
2012 3rd quarter* 142,938 22,387 36,365 121,735 119,851 10,936 24,456 8,667 8,731 . 203,687 81,793 22,358 27,760 41.7 11,558 12.5 . 11,124 23,215 7,692,011 -1,171 1,009,702 . 45.9 38.2 50.2 69.6 -4.4 . 7,841 61,504 -1.8 68,350 -6,846 3.0 6,893 9.8 1,955,128 346,194 230,041 217,183 989,758 827,305 675,444 1,917 . . 6.7 9,564 1,184 -1,884 -200
2012 4th quarter* 154,879 22,655 36,191 133,395 130,787 17,247 27,416 12,044 10,311 . 213,613 86,979 22,339 27,616 39.5 14,392 14.5 . 11,253 22,572 7,678,721 -6,458 1,002,195 . 46.4 38.6 50.4 71.3 -4.1 . 8,534 64,812 -2.2 68,232 -3,420 7.5 6,903 9.4 1,983,738 346,386 234,427 216,923 1,015,327 833,106 672,269 -3,086 . . 9.0 13,925 1,171 -2,608 -442
2012* 599,338 89,044 138,930 515,949 505,833 61,934 105,081 44,170 42,615 6,734.7 839,463 339,897 83,443 105,880 38.3 53,383 14.8 4,118.0 44,605 89,658 7,678,721 226 1,002,195 213.5 46.4 38.6 50.4 71.3 -4.1 1,057.9 33,516 267,468 -2.2 273,294 -5,826 10.7 27,683 9.1 1,983,738 346,386 234,427 216,923 1,015,327 833,106 672,269 1,383 469.0 876.3 8.4 50,349 5,655 -10,116 -1,727
2013 1st quarter* 149,345 22,059 39,286 130,141 126,752 16,813 22,251 16,140 17,190 . 209,136 86,225 24,787 31,287 42.4 10,651 12.9 . 11,656 22,395 7,629,131 1,347 1,002,884 . 46.8 38.8 49.8 72.0 -3.1 . 8,296 59,752 -2.6 69,100 -9,348 1.1 6,158 8.8 2,031,212 350,993 244,477 220,667 1,043,675 849,573 671,300 -814 . . 11.5 17,163 2,855 -3,389 -481
2013 2nd quarter* 151,882 22,313 23,822 128,317 125,855 13,571 25,330 10,275 11,246 . 205,063 84,841 11,273 16,069 27.2 13,470 15.7 . 11,310 23,386 7,526,521 -3,998 998,050 . 47.3 39.1 49.9 74.0 -2.7 . 7,546 80,232 -2.6 68,009 12,223 24.3 6,327 7.0 2,001,792 353,829 239,739 215,989 1,018,504 841,258 669,266 -1,968 . . 9.4 14,277 -1,252 -2,462 -279
2013 3rd quarter* 144,919 22,575 37,131 119,800 117,667 9,028 22,423 8,737 5,682 . 200,985 82,479 22,264 29,461 41.5 9,856 11.5 . 10,958 22,233 7,443,631 -12,044 985,108 . 47.6 39.5 49.9 73.6 -2.4 . 9,007 62,661 -2.6 68,090 -5,429 5.6 6,870 9.5 2,016,780 351,767 252,027 215,536 1,027,549 843,365 667,643 -1,521 . . 9.6 13,871 -2,544 -2,133 -443
2013 4th quarter* 156,512 22,844 37,360 131,860 128,715 15,744 27,683 10,515 9,946 . 212,530 87,964 22,442 28,471 39.1 15,911 17.4 . 10,971 21,974 7,297,449 -13,311 965,205 . 47.3 39.3 49.8 73.5 -2.5 . 9,585 67,544 -1.1 68,261 -717 11.3 6,981 9.1 2,038,238 348,188 258,267 214,667 1,046,829 840,995 663,783 -3,742 . . 10.1 15,876 -1,808 -3,145 -390
2013* 602,658 89,791 137,599 510,118 498,989 55,156 97,687 45,667 44,064 . 827,714 341,509 80,766 105,288 37.5 49,888 14.4 . 44,895 89,988 7,297,449 -28,006 965,205 . 47.3 39.3 49.8 73.5 -2.5 . 34,434 270,189 -1.1 273,460 -3,271 11.5 26,336 8.5 2,038,238 348,188 258,267 214,667 1,046,829 840,995 663,783 -8,045 . . 10.2 61,187 -2,749 -11,129 -1,593
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description

This table presents a number of key figures of the sector accounts. These main indicators provide the most important information on the total economy and on the main institutional sectors of the economy: non-financial corporations, financial corporations, general government, households including non-profit institutions serving households and the rest of the world.

Data available from:
Years from 1969 to 2013
Quarters from first quarter 2005 to fourth quarter 2013.

Status of the figures:
The figures concerning 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 are (revised) provisional. Because this table is discontinued, figures will not be updated anymore.

Changes as of June 25th 2014:
None, this table is discontinued.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore.
This table is replaced by table Sector accounts; key figures. See paragraph 3.

Description topics

Total economy
The total economy consists of non-financial corporations, financial corporations, general government, households and non-profit institutions (NPI) serving households. The breakdown into institutional sectors is based on international rules.
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product (GDP) is the final result of the production activities of resident producer units. It is equal to the total value added at basic prices of industries, supplemented with some transactions which are not attributed to individual industries. The value added (basic prices) by sector is equal to the difference between output (basic prices) and intermediate consumption (purchasers' prices). The transactions which are not attributed to individual industries are the balance of taxes and subsidies on products and the difference between imputed and paid VAT (value added tax). Gross domestic product also equals the value of income generated in the Netherlands.

Consumption of fixed capital
Consumption of fixed capital represents the depreciation of the stock of produced fixed assets, as a result of normal technical and economical ageing and insurable accidental damage. Losses due to catastrophes and unforeseen ageing are seen as a capital loss.
Net operating surplus / mixed income
Net operating surplus / mixed income remains after deducting consumption of fixed capital from gross operating surplus / mixed income.
Gross operating surplus is the balance that remains after deducting from the value added the compensation of employees and the balance of other taxes and subsidies on production. The operating surplus of family enterprises is called mixed income, because it also contains compensation for work by the owners and their family members.
The operating surplus of the total economy is the sum of all operating surplus or mixed income of individual sectors.
Net national income
Net national income remains after deducting consumption of fixed capital from gross national income.
The national income is the income that the sectors receive for their direct participation in the production process and the income that they receive in exchange for the provision of financial resources, land, etc. National income is the sum of GDP and net primary income from the rest of the world. It can also be calculated as the sum of the primary income of all sectors together (total economy).
Net disposable national income
Disposable income is the balancing item of the secondary distribution of income account. It shows for each sector its disposable income, which remains after the redistribution of primary income by compulsory or non-compulsory current transfers between the sectors. Total disposable income of all resident units is called disposable national income, which is equal to national income plus net current transfers received from the rest of the world.
Net disposable income remains after deducting consumption of fixed capital from gross disposable income.
Net national saving
Saving is the difference between disposable income and final consumption expenditure, adjusted for net equity in pension funds reserves. Net saving remains after deducting consumption of fixed capital from gross saving.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure for produced tangible or intangible assets that are used in the production process for more than one year.

Gross fixed capital formation consists of producers’ acquisitions less disposals of fixed assets:
- acquisitions, less disposals, of tangible fixed assets:
dwellings and non-residential buildings.
civil engineering works.
transport equipment.
machinery, equipment and computers.
cultivated assets (trees and livestock).
- acquisitions, less disposals, of intangible fixed assets:
mineral exploration.
computer software.
entertainment, literary or artistic originals.
other intangible fixed assets.
- major improvements to land (reclamation, land consolidation and land preparing for building).

Fixed capital formation also includes:
- work in progress of construction such as unfinished dwellings, non-residential buildings and civil engineering works are recorded as fixed capital formation of the client.
- military structures and equipment, similar to those used by civilian producers, such as airfields and hospitals.
- improvements to existing fixed assets that go well beyond the requirements of ordinary maintenance and repairs.
- transfer costs of fixed assets, such as conveyance fees and costs made by real estate agents, architects and notaries.

On the level of the total economy and the sectors, an adjustment is made for the transactions in used fixed assets, which are seen as investments of the buyer and disinvestment of the seller. This adjustment is not made for the industries.
The registration of fixed capital formation by industry and sector is on an owner basis. That means that fixed capital formation is registered on the industry or sector which can be considered to be the economic owner of the capital goods concerned.
Net lending (+) or net borrowing (-)
Net lending (+) or net borrowing (-) is the balancing item on the current and the capital account. This balance is equal to the balance of transactions on the financial account; a deficit on the current and capital account is financed by new liabilities and/or the sale of financial assets. In case of a surplus, liabilities are repaid and/or financial assets acquired.
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Net lending or net borrowing for the total economy is equal to the balance on the current and the capital account of all the domestic sectors. The balance of the financial account for the total economy shows the amount of net lending to or borrowing from the rest of the world.
Changes in financial net worth
Changes in financial net worth as established from the financial transactions, equal all changes in financial relations of one sector with other sectors or with the rest of the world. Basically, this balance equals net lending (+) or net borrowing (-).However as a consequence of using various sources for current and capital transactions and for financial transactions statistical discrepancies will appear.
Labour input of employed persons
The amount of labour that is deployed in a given period. The volume of labour can be expressed in jobs, in full-time equivalent jobs or in labour hours worked.
Employed persons are all persons who are working for a institutional unit residing in the Netherlands.
Employed persons include all persons who:
– have a paid job for at least one hour a week.
– perform a job of which the payment is withheld from registration of tax and/or social insurance authorities, while the work itself is legal.
– are temporarily not working (due to illness, bad weather, etc.), but who continue to receive their remuneration.
– have taken a temporarily unpaid leave.
Employed persons may either be employees or self-employed. Employees are persons who during a reference period performed some work for wage or salary, in cash or in kind. Self-employed persons are those who earn their income by performing labour on their own (company, profession) or who cooperate in the business of their family. The latter are not counted as self-employed if there is an employment contract.
Non-financial corporations
The sector non-financial corporations consists of all (quasi-)corporations which are principally engaged in the production of goods and marketable non-financial services.
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Non-financial corporations include:
- all corporations, quasi-corporations and co-operative organisations which do not belong to the financial corporations.
- all non-profit institutions which do not pertain to the other sectors. Examples are old people’s homes, hospitals and housing corporations.
- public enterprises, which are fully or partly owned by the government, like Dutch Railways (NS).
Output
Output covers the value of all goods produced for sale, including unsold goods, and all receipts for services rendered. Output furthermore covers the market equivalent of goods and services produced for own use, such as own account capital formation, services of owner-occupied dwellings and agricultural products produced by farmers for own consumption. The output of such goods is estimated by valuing the quantities produced against the price that the producer would have received if these goods had been sold.
Output is valued at basic prices, defined as the price received by the producer excluding trade and transport margins and the balance of taxes and subsidies on products. This is the price the producer is ultimately left with.
Gross value added
Gross value added (basic prices) per sector is equal to the difference between the production (basic prices) and intermediate consumption (purchasers' prices).
Net operating surplus
Net operating surplus remains after deducting consumption of fixed capital from gross operating surplus.
Gross operating surplus is the balance that remains after deducting from the value added the compensation of employees and the balance of other taxes and subsidies on production.
Net profits before taxes
The net profit before taxes of non-financial corporations is calculated as follows:
Net operating surplus
plus received property income (interest, dividends, etc.)
minus paid interest
minus paid income from land and subsoil assets

Profit ratio
The profit ratio is calculated as the gross operating surplus divided by the gross value added. This profitability-type indicator shows the part of the value added which is generated by capital during the production process. It is the complement of the share of labour costs (plus net taxes on production) in value added. The gross operating surplus is an approximation of operating profit including consumption of fixed capital.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure for produced tangible or intangible assets that are used in the production process for more than one year.

Gross fixed capital formation consists of producers’ acquisitions less disposals of fixed assets:
- acquisitions, less disposals, of tangible fixed assets:
dwellings and non-residential buildings.
civil engineering works.
transport equipment.
machinery, equipment and computers.
cultivated assets (trees and livestock).
- acquisitions, less disposals, of intangible fixed assets:
mineral exploration.
computer software.
entertainment, literary or artistic originals.
other intangible fixed assets.
- major improvements to land (reclamation, land consolidation and land preparing for building).

Fixed capital formation also includes:
- work in progress of construction such as unfinished dwellings, non-residential buildings and civil engineering works are recorded as fixed capital formation of the client.
- military structures and equipment, similar to those used by civilian producers, such as airfields and hospitals.
- improvements to existing fixed assets that go well beyond the requirements of ordinary maintenance and repairs.
- transfer costs of fixed assets, such as conveyance fees and costs made by real estate agents, architects and notaries.

On the level of the total economy and the sectors, an adjustment is made for the transactions in used fixed assets, which are seen as investments of the buyer and disinvestment of the seller. This adjustment is not made for the industries.
The registration of fixed capital formation by industry and sector is on an owner basis. That means that fixed capital formation is registered on the industry or sector which can be considered to be the economic owner of the capital goods concerned.
Capital formation ratio
Capital formation ratio is calculated as gross fixed capital formation divided by gross value added.
Labour input of employees
The amount of labour that is deployed by employees in a given period. Employees are persons who during a reference period performed some work for wage or salary, in cash or in kind. The volume of labour can be expressed in jobs, in full-time equivalent jobs or in labour hours worked.
Financial corporations
The sector financial corporations consists of all (quasi-)corporations which are principally engaged in intermediation (acquisition, transformation and distribution of financial means), insurance (conversion of individual into collective risks) and financial auxiliary services.
This sector consists of three subsectors: monetary financial institutions, insurance corporations and pension funds and other financial institutions.
Gross value added
Gross value added (basic prices) per sector is equal to the difference between the production (basic prices) and intermediate consumption (purchasers' prices).
Net profits before taxes
The net profit before taxes of financial corporations is calculated as follows:
Net operating surplus
plus received property income (interest, dividends, etc.)
minus paid interest
minus paid income from land and subsoil assets
Financial assets
The financial assets of the institutional sector financial corporations at the end of a period.
Net lending to private sector
The difference between borrowed short-term and long-term credits and repayment of the non-financial corporations and households to other monetary financial institutions and other financial intermediaries in a period.
Lending to private sector, end of period
Total of short-term and long-term loans by other monetary financial institutions and other financial intermediaries to the non-financial corporations and households at the end of the period concerned.
Labour input of employees
The amount of labour that is deployed by employees in a given period. Employees are persons who during a reference period performed some work for wage or salary, in cash or in kind. The volume of labour can be expressed in jobs, in full-time equivalent jobs or in labour hours worked.
General government (consolidated)
The sector general government primarily consists of all entities (covered by public law) that carry out activities regarding the redistribution of income and wealth. In the Netherlands this concerns ministries, municipalities, provinces, water boards and the like. In the second place general government consists of entities that are controlled and mainly financed by the aforementioned entities, and do not produce for the market. Non-market output means that the sale proceeds are structural less than 50 per cent of the production costs. In this way, for instance, Prorail and the Open University are counted to the general government.
Government institutions that are active abroad, like embassies, belong to the sector general government as well. On the other hand foreign embassies and international institutions, like Europol and the International Court of Justice, do not belong to the Dutch government.
Public enterprises (like the Dutch Railways, Amsterdam Airport (Schiphol), the Dutch Municipal Bank (BNG) and quasi-corporations are no part of the sector general government. The Dutch Central Bank (DNB) also does not belong to the sector general government.
The general government sector is split up into three subsectors: central government, local government and social security funds.
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Consolidated means that the transactions between government-units are eliminated.
Total revenue
Total revenue of the sector general government.
The total revenue of the general government per quarter as a percentage of GDP is a moving annual total. It is calculated as the total revenue of the general government for the quarterly report plus the previous three quarters, divided by the GDP in the reporting quarterly plus the previous three quarters. The figure for the fourth quarter is equal to the annual figure.
Taxes and social security contributions
The total of taxes and social security contributions which the Government receives.
Taxes are mandatory payments to the Government with no direct compensation. The taxes are divided into:
- taxes on production and imports;
- taxes on income and capital;
- wealth taxes (capital transfers).
Social security contributions are payments by households to social insurance institutions for the financing of the social benefits.
The total tax and contribution revenues of the Government per quarter as a percentage of GDP is a moving annual total. It is calculated as the total tax and contribution revenues of the Government for the quarterly report plus the previous three quarters, divided by the GDP in the quarterly report plus the previous three quarters. The figure for the fourth quarter is equal to the annual figure.
Total expenditure
Total expenditure of the Government. These expenditures include the remuneration of employees, intermediate consumption, fixed capital formation, legal social insurance, social benefits, subsidies, benefits legal provision income property, other expenditure n.e.c. (taxes on production and not related to products, benefits directly by employers, other current transfers, capital transfers, balance buying and selling of non-produced non-financial assets).
Consumption of fixed capital is not included in the expenditure.
The total expenditure of the Government per quarter as a percentage of GDP is a moving annual total. It is calculated as the total expenditure of the Government for the quarterly report plus the previous three quarters, divided by the GDP in the quarterly report plus the previous three quarters. The figure for the fourth quarter is equal to the annual figure.
EDP-debt
The consolidated debt of the general government (valued at the nominal value) excluding the debt and other debt on the title financial derivatives, expressed as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP). For the general government the public debt is consolidated. This means that transactions between government-units are eliminated.
Due to differences in valuation method the sum of the debt-titles of the public debt (nominal) is not equal to the sum of the debt-titles in the national accounts (market value). The debt consists of the titles: currency, short-term securities, bonds, short-term loans and long-term loans. General government debt (also known as EDP-debt) is one of the components of the Stability and Growth pact. EDP stands for Excessive Deficit Procedure.
The total expenditure of the general government per quarter as a percentage of GDP is a moving annual total. It is calculated as the total expenditure of the general government for the reporting quarter plus the previous three quarters, divided by the GDP in the reporting quarter plus the previous three quarters. The figure for the fourth quarter is equal to the annual figure.


EDP-deficit
The EDP-deficit is the net borrowing of the government as defined in the National accounts plus the interest advantage / less the interest disadvantage that the government has from interest swaps which she has arranged. The EDP-deficit is one of the parts of the Stability and growth pact.
The EDP-deficit of the general government per quarter as a percentage of GDP is a moving annual total. It is calculated as the EDP-deficit of the general government for the reporting quarter plus the previous three quarters, divided by the GDP in the reporting quarter plus the previous three quarters. The figure for the fourth quarter is equal to the annual figure.


Labour input of employees
The amount of labour that is deployed by employees in a given period. Employees are persons who during a reference period performed some work for wage or salary, in cash or in kind. The volume of labour can be expressed in jobs, in full-time equivalent jobs or in labour hours worked.
Households including NPISH
Households including non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH) include:
- Sector households, that consists of all natural persons who are resident for more than one year in the Netherlands, irrespective of their nationality. On the other hand Dutch citizens who stay abroad for longer than one year do not belong to the Dutch sector households.
The sector households does not only cover independently living persons, but also persons in nursing homes, old people’s homes, prisons, boarding schools, etc. If persons are entrepreneurs, their business also belongs to the sector households. This is the case for self-employed persons (one-man business). Large autonomous unincorporated enterprises (quasi-corporations) are included in the sector non-financial or financial corporations.
- Sector non-profit institutions (NPI) serving households, that consists of foundations and clubs whose resources are principally derived from voluntary contributions from households or from property income. Examples are religious organisations, charity organisations, political parties, trade unions and cultural, sports and recreational organisations.
Net mixed income
The operating surplus of family enterprises is called mixed income, because it also contains compensation for work by the owners and their family members.
Net operating surplus / mixed income remains after deducting consumption of fixed capital from gross operating surplus / mixed income.

Net disposable income
Disposable income is the balancing item of the secondary distribution of income account. It shows for each sector its disposable income, which remains after the redistribution of primary income by compulsory or non-compulsory current transfers between the sectors. Total disposable income of all resident units is called disposable national income, which is equal to national income plus net current transfers received from the rest of the world.
Net disposable income remains after deducting consumption of fixed capital from gross disposable income.
Net real disposable income
Disposable income of a sector is the income that remains after redistribution of the primary income by compulsory or non-compulsory current transfers between sectors (taxes on income and capital, social premiums and benefits and other income transfers). Primary income is defined as income from compensation of employees, interest, dividends, taxes and subsidies on production and imports. Disposable income is spent on consumption and free savings.
Real disposable income is disposable income adjusted for the price changes in the consumer expenditure of households (including non-profit institutions serving households).
The percentage change of the real disposable income is calculated on the basis of moving annual totals. The real disposable income of a reporting quarter plus that of the previous three quarters is divided by the sum of real disposable income of the four corresponding quarters a year earlier. The percentage change for the fourth quarter is equal to the change for the year.


Final consumption expenditure
Final consumption expenditure of households including NPI households consists of expenditure incurred by resident institutional units on goods and services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs or wants. Final consumption expenditure may take place on the domestic territory or abroad.

Free / individual savings
The part of the disposable income of sector households including NPISH that is not used for the final consumption expenditure. The sum of the free savings and the balance of capital transfers received is available for capital formation, investments in financial assets or debt repayment.

Savings ratio
The savings ratio equals the gross disposable income, adjusted for the net equity in pension funds reserves, minus the consumption expenditure divided by the gross disposable income, adjusted for the net equity in pension funds reserves.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure for produced tangible or intangible assets that are used in the production process for more than one year.
Households' capital formation mainly consists of dwellings. The residual part includes the capital formation in machinery, transport equipment and the like by self-employed workers and non-profit institutions serving households.
Consumer durables (which also include private cars) are not part of households' capital formation but considered as final consumption expenditure by households.
Households' capital formation ratio
Households' capital formation ratio equals gross household capital formation divided by gross disposable income, adjusted for the net equity in pension funds reserves.
Financial assets
Financial assets of the sector households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH).
Total
Financial assets of the sector households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH).
Savings deposits and other deposits
Savings deposits and other deposits are all the savings of individuals and deposits (in euros and foreign currency) at any resident and non-resident bank, which are not immediately transferable without restrictions. As a liability this transaction only exists for monetary financial institutions and the rest of the world.
Shares and other equities
Shares and other equities are all claims, which are fully or partly entitled to a share in profits or in the own funds in case of liquidation. Included is the value of capital formation by the government in public enterprises (quasi-corporations) that belong to the government.
Shares and other equities include:
- Quoted shares
- Unquoted shares and other equities
- Mutual funds shares

Net equity in life insurance reserves
The net equity of households in the life insurance reserves of resident and non-resident pension funds and life insurance companies is seen as a financial asset that belongs to resident and non-resident households.
The net equity of households in the life insurance reserves is built up as follows:
  actual life insurance contributions (gross)
minus:  compensation of insurance services (=consumption)
plus:  supplement from investment income
=  life insurance contributions
minus:  life insurance benefits
=  net equity of households in life insurance reserves
Net equity in pension funds reserves
The net equity of households in the pension funds reserves of resident pension funds and life insurance companies is seen as a financial asset that belongs to resident and non-resident households.
The net equity of households in the pension funds reserves is built up as follows:
  actual contributions to pension schemes (gross)
minus:  compensation of insurance services (=consumption)
plus:  supplement from investment income
=  contributions to pension schemes
minus:  pension benefits
plus:  imputed capital transfers
=  net equity of households in pension funds reserves
Liabilities
The liabilities of the sector households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH).
Total
The liabilities of the sector households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH).
Home mortgages; closing balance
Total of the home mortgages at the end of the period. These are long-term loans with as collateral the property itself which is occupied by the private person.


Home mortgages; net lending
Acquisitions less disposals of home mortgages in a period. Home mortgages are long-term loans linked to dwellings owned by households. The dwellings serve as collateral.
Labour input of employees
The amount of labour that is deployed by employees in a given period. Employees are persons who during a reference period performed some work for wage or salary, in cash or in kind. The volume of labour can be expressed in jobs, in full-time equivalent jobs or in labour hours worked.
Labour input of self-employed persons
The amount of labour that is deployed by self-employed persons in a specific time period. Self-employed persons are those who earn their income by performing labour on their own (company, profession) or who cooperate in the business of their family. The latter are not counted as self-employed if there is an employment contract.
Rest of the world
In the national accounts the rest of the world is not an institutional sector. The rest of the world covers transactions between resident and non-resident institutional units.
Net exports share
The difference between exports and imports of goods and services as a percentage of gross domestic product.
Net exports
The difference between exports and imports of goods and services.
Net primary income abroad
The difference between the received primary income from the rest of the world and the paid primary income to the rest of the world. Primary income consists of compensation of employees, taxes and subsidies on production and imports, and property income.
Net current transfers abroad
The difference between the received current transfers from the rest of the world and the paid current transfers to the rest of the world. Current transfers are dividend tax, social security benefits and other current transfers.
Net capital transfers abroad
The difference between the received capital transfers from the rest of the world and the paid capital transfers to the rest of the world.
Capital transfers are transactions, either in cash or in kind, in which the ownership of an asset (other than cash and inventories) is transferred from one institutional unit to another, or in which cash is transferred to enable the recipient to acquire another asset, or in which the funds realised by the disposal of another asset are transferred. The receipt of a capital transfer by a recipient is generally meant to finance fixed capital formation or other long-term expenses.