Economic totals per region, 2001-2004

Economic totals per region, 2001-2004

Regions Periods GDP (mln. euro) GDP per capita (1 000 euro) Relation GDP (basic prices) (mln. euro) Total value added (at basic prices) (mln. euro) Compensation of employees (mln. euro) Taxes (not product-related) (mln. euro) Subsidies (not product-related) (mln. euro) Gross operating surplus (mln. euro) Correction operating surplus (mln. euro) Total gross operating surplus (mln. euro)
The Netherlands 2001 447,731 28 50,175 397,556 227,390 4,788 3,810 169,188 1,008 170,196
The Netherlands 2002 465,214 29 50,840 414,374 238,825 5,004 3,979 174,524 1,134 175,658
The Netherlands 2003 476,945 29 51,689 425,256 245,752 5,050 3,683 178,137 711 178,848
The Netherlands 2004* 489,854 30 54,017 435,837 250,171 5,320 4,053 184,399 224 184,623
North Netherlands 2001 43,561 26 4,882 38,679 19,350 431 345 19,243 98 19,341
North Netherlands 2002 44,538 26 4,867 39,671 20,399 452 359 19,179 109 19,288
North Netherlands 2003 46,222 27 5,009 41,213 21,103 456 323 19,978 69 20,047
North Netherlands 2004* 46,956 28 5,178 41,778 21,432 473 376 20,249 21 20,270
East Netherlands 2001 79,054 23 8,859 70,195 42,014 896 736 28,022 178 28,200
East Netherlands 2002 81,805 24 8,940 72,865 43,991 938 765 28,701 199 28,900
East Netherlands 2003 84,419 25 9,149 75,270 45,752 974 762 29,305 126 29,431
East Netherlands 2004* 86,873 25 9,580 77,293 46,738 1,034 807 30,328 40 30,368
West Netherlands 2001 225,207 30 25,238 199,969 117,978 2,405 1,927 81,513 507 82,020
West Netherlands 2002 236,560 31 25,852 210,708 123,988 2,512 2,034 86,243 577 86,820
West Netherlands 2003 242,295 32 26,259 216,036 126,877 2,514 1,846 88,491 361 88,852
West Netherlands 2004* 248,924 33 27,449 221,475 129,135 2,656 2,053 91,737 114 91,851
South Netherlands 2001 94,922 27 10,637 84,285 47,721 1,050 800 36,313 214 36,527
South Netherlands 2002 98,026 28 10,713 87,313 50,105 1,097 819 36,929 239 37,168
South Netherlands 2003 99,862 28 10,823 89,039 51,666 1,101 750 37,022 149 37,171
South Netherlands 2004* 102,044 29 11,253 90,791 52,500 1,150 815 37,956 47 38,003
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description

GDP, GDP per capita, consistency with GDP, total value added, taxes,
compensation of employees, subsidies, gross operating surplus by region
2001 - 2004
Changed on February 11 2008.
Frequency: Discontinued.

Description topics

GDP
Value added at market prices of the total economy (GDP)
is calculated as follows:
total value added at basic prices of industries
plus: balance of taxes and subsidies on products
plus: difference imputed and paid VAT.
VAT, taxes on imports and subsidies on re-exports cannot be
attributed to individual industries. Therefore, GDP at market
prices cannot be broken down completely by industry.
Value added can be valued gross (including consumption of
fixed capital) or net (excluding consumption of fixed capital).
GDP per capita
Gross domestic product (GDP), value added at market prices of the
total economy, per capita.
Relation GDP (basic prices)
Gross domestic product (GDP); GDP at market prices consistent with GDP
at basic prices.
Total value added (at basic prices)
Value added at basic prices of total enterprises equals the difference
between the production (basic prices) and intermediate consumption
(purchasers' prices).
Compensation of employees
Compensation of employees is the total renumeration paid by employers
to their employees in return for work done.
Employees are all residents and non-residents working in a paid job.
Managing directors of limited companies are considered to be employees;
therefore their salaries are also included in the compensation of
employees. The same holds for people working in sheltered workshops.
Compensation of employees is distinguished between wages and salaries
and employers' social contributions.
Wages and salaries include income taxes and employees' social
contributions even if they are actually withheld by the employer and paid
directly to tax authorities, social security schemes and pension schemes.
Wages include payments that are periodically and directly paid to
employees. Besides they contain extra's (such as bonuses, overtime pay,
tips, commission), wages in kind (such as free housing, free food,
'company car', day nursery, lower interest rates on mortgages,
free travel (or at reduced prices) and holiday allowances. Furthermore,
certain refunds for costs made by the employee, such as travel expenses
to and from work, are included as well.
Employers' social contributions consist of payments to insurers made by
employers for the benefit of their employees. They can be classified in
employers' social security contributions, employers' private social
contributions (o.w. pension schemes) and the imputed social contributions.
In most cases the employers directly pay the employers' social
contributions to the insurers. However, to show that these contributions
are paid for the benefit of employees, these payments are recorded as two
transactions: a) employers pay employers' social contributions to their
employees, and b) employees pay the same contributions to social
insurance funds.
Taxes (not product-related)
Taxes on production paid by producers, not related to the value or volume
of the products produced or transacted. Examples are real estate tax
and sewerage charges paid by producers.
Subsidies (not product-related)
Subsidies on production paid to producers, not related to the value or
volume of products domestically produced or transacted. These are
mainly wage subsidies.
Gross operating surplus
The gross operating surplus by industry is the balance that remains
after deducting from the value added (basic prices) the compensation
of employees and the balance of not product-related taxes and
not product-related subsidies on production.
The operating surplus of family enterprises is called mixed income,
because it also contains compensation for work by the owners and their
family members.
On the level of the total economy operating surplus is computed by
adding to the total of the industries the difference imputed and
paid VAT.
Correction operating surplus
The difference between the imputed and paid VAT.
Total gross operating surplus
Gross operating surplus of industries plus correction operating surplus.