Poor chances on the job market for chronic patients

24/03/2011 15:00

Only 7 percent of unemployed chronic patients in 2008 had managed to find jobs one year later. The chances of finding a job for people without chronic diseases were more than twice as high. For chronic patients with disability benefits, it is becoming more and more difficult to find employment.

Higher age also has negative effect on job chances

In 2008, there were 1.2 million 15 to 65-year-olds suffering from chronic diseases, who did not belong to the employed labour force. After one year, 86 thousand people in this group (7 percent) had found jobs for 12 hours or more a week versus 18 percent in the group without chronic diseases.

Age turns out to be a more important factor to reduce the chance of finding a job: in 2009, only 3 percent of healthy people aged between 55 and 65 had found employment after one year versus 18 percent of 15 to 35-year-olds with chronic disorders.

Inflow in employed labour force, from 2008 to 2009

Inflow in employed labour force, from 2008 to 2009

Chronic patients at greater risk of losing their jobs

In 2008, the employed labour force included nearly 1.3 million people suffering from chronic disorders. One year later, nearly 10 percent of them had lost their jobs or were no longer included in the employed labour force versus 6 percent of healthy persons. In younger and older age categories, a relatively large group of people are still unemployed after one year.

Outflow from employed labour force, from 2008 to 2009

Outflow from employed labour force, from 2008 to 2009

Position of disabled on the labour market deteriorating

The chances of finding employment for chronic patients receiving disability benefits are deteriorating. Over the period 2003-2008, the chances for them of finding employment within one year have been reduced from nearly 4 to nearly 3 percent. Chronic patients without benefits, on the other hand, more often manage to (re-)enter the labour market.

Chronic patients and inflow into employed labour force

Chronic patients and inflow into employed labour force

John Michiels