Income, consumption, wealth of households: key figures; National Accounts

Income, consumption, wealth of households: key figures; National Accounts

Characteristics of households Periods Total amount Income Gross operating surplus and mixed income (million euros) Total amount Income Gross mixed income (million euros) Total amount Income Compensation of employees (million euros) Total amount Income Gross disposable income (million euros) Total amount Income Social transfers in kind (million euros) Total amount Income Gross adjusted disposable income (million euros) Total amount Expenditure Final consumption expenditure (million euros) Total amount Expenditure Actual individual consumption (million euros) Total amount Expenditure Gross saving (million euros) Total amount Wealth Net worth (million euros) Total amount Wealth Financial assets Total (million euros) Total amount Wealth Financial assets Pension entitlements and claims (million euros) Total amount Wealth Financial assets Other assets (million euros) Total amount Wealth Financial liabilities Total (million euros) Total amount Wealth Financial liabilities Home mortgages; closing balance (million euros) Total amount Wealth Financial liabilities Other liabilities (million euros) Total amount Wealth Non-financial assets (million euros) Average amount Income Gross operating surplus and mixed income (1,000 euro) Average amount Income Gross mixed income (1,000 euro) Average amount Income Compensation of employees (1,000 euro) Average amount Income Gross disposable income (1,000 euro) Average amount Income Social transfers in kind (1,000 euro) Average amount Income Gross adjusted disposable income (1,000 euro) Average amount Expenditure Final consumption expenditure (1,000 euro) Average amount Expenditure Actual individual consumption (1,000 euro) Average amount Expenditure Gross saving (1,000 euro) Average amount Wealth Net worth (1,000 euro) Average amount Wealth Financial assets Total (1,000 euro) Average amount Wealth Financial assets Pension entitlements and claims (1,000 euro) Average amount Wealth Financial assets Other assets (1,000 euro) Average amount Wealth Financial liabilities Total (1,000 euro) Average amount Wealth Financial liabilities Home mortgages; closing balance (1,000 euro) Average amount Wealth Financial liabilities Other liabilities (1,000 euro) Average amount Wealth Non-financial assets (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Income Gross operating surplus and mixed income (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Income Gross mixed income (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Income Compensation of employees (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Income Gross disposable income (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Income Social transfers in kind (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Income Gross adjusted disposable income (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Expenditure Final consumption expenditure (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Expenditure Actual individual consumption (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Expenditure Gross saving (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Wealth Net worth (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Wealth Financial assets Total (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Wealth Financial assets Pension entitlements and claims (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Wealth Financial assets Other assets (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Wealth Financial liabilities Total (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Wealth Financial liabilities Home mortgages; closing balance (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Wealth Financial liabilities Other liabilities (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Wealth Non-financial assets (1,000 euro)
Total 2019* 20,283 77,570 378,807 396,756 142,357 539,113 347,622 489,979 76,404 3,567,623 2,515,265 1,479,980 1,035,285 846,267 726,392 119,875 1,898,625 2.5 9.5 46.5 48.7 17.5 66.2 42.7 60.2 9.4 440.1 310.3 182.6 127.7 104.4 89.6 14.8 234.2 1.7 6.4 31.0 32.5 11.7 44.1 28.5 40.1 6.3 292.0 205.9 121.1 84.7 69.3 59.5 9.8 155.4
Disposable income: 1st 20%-group 2019* 465 3,024 8,030 22,413 29,227 51,640 40,078 69,305 -16,634 220,474 195,863 98,803 97,060 35,077 24,247 10,830 59,688 0.3 1.9 4.9 13.8 18.0 31.7 24.6 42.6 -10.2 136.0 120.8 60.9 59.9 21.6 15.0 6.7 36.8 0.2 1.5 3.9 10.8 14.1 24.9 19.3 33.4 -8.0 106.2 94.4 47.6 46.8 16.9 11.7 5.2 28.8
Disposable income: 2nd 20%-group 2019* 2,252 3,924 27,910 46,708 31,004 77,712 48,978 79,982 -3,462 337,054 250,181 148,172 102,010 60,739 51,935 8,804 147,612 1.4 2.4 17.1 28.7 19.0 47.7 30.1 49.1 -2.1 207.9 154.3 91.4 62.9 37.5 32.0 5.4 91.0 1.0 1.7 12.3 20.5 13.6 34.2 21.5 35.2 -1.5 148.2 110.0 65.1 44.9 26.7 22.8 3.9 64.9
Disposable income: 3rd 20%-group 2019* 4,956 6,829 68,053 71,473 29,766 101,239 66,108 95,874 8,047 602,504 409,524 268,314 141,211 144,503 131,118 13,385 337,483 3.0 4.2 41.8 43.9 18.3 62.2 40.6 58.9 4.9 371.6 252.6 165.5 87.1 89.1 80.9 8.3 208.1 1.9 2.7 26.6 27.9 11.6 39.6 25.8 37.5 3.1 235.5 160.0 104.9 55.2 56.5 51.2 5.2 131.9
Disposable income: 4th 20%-group 2019* 6,253 11,723 110,039 95,893 27,794 123,687 83,618 111,412 20,824 844,555 576,353 388,022 188,331 224,969 206,707 18,262 493,171 3.8 7.2 67.6 58.9 17.1 76.0 51.4 68.4 12.8 520.9 355.5 239.3 116.2 138.7 127.5 11.3 304.2 2.3 4.4 41.3 36.0 10.4 46.4 31.4 41.8 7.8 317.0 216.3 145.6 70.7 84.4 77.6 6.9 185.1
Disposable income: 5th 20%-group 2019* 6,357 52,070 164,775 160,269 24,566 184,835 108,840 133,406 67,629 1,563,036 1,083,344 576,669 506,673 380,979 312,385 68,594 860,671 3.9 32.0 101.2 98.5 15.1 113.5 66.9 81.9 41.5 964.0 668.2 355.7 312.5 235.0 192.7 42.3 530.8 2.4 19.7 62.3 60.6 9.3 69.9 41.2 50.4 25.6 590.9 409.6 218.0 191.5 144.0 118.1 25.9 325.4
Type: Single man 2019* 2,412 7,787 38,145 41,952 11,140 53,092 50,408 61,548 -6,390 348,419 250,692 135,308 115,383 79,618 64,547 15,071 177,345 1.7 5.4 26.3 29.0 7.7 36.7 34.8 42.5 -4.4 241.5 173.8 93.8 80.0 55.2 44.7 10.4 122.9 1.7 5.3 26.1 28.7 7.6 36.4 34.5 42.2 -4.4 241.5 173.8 93.8 80.0 55.2 44.7 10.4 122.9
Type: Single woman 2019* 2,546 3,759 23,148 37,597 20,498 58,095 48,894 69,392 -12,869 375,323 276,770 165,226 111,544 54,750 42,787 11,964 153,303 1.7 2.5 15.1 24.5 13.4 37.9 31.9 45.2 -8.4 245.6 181.1 108.1 73.0 35.8 28.0 7.8 100.3 1.7 2.4 15.0 24.4 13.3 37.7 31.7 45.1 -8.4 245.6 181.1 108.1 73.0 35.8 28.0 7.8 100.3
Type: One-parent family 2019* 863 4,052 20,994 23,480 11,847 35,327 20,862 32,709 4,615 139,606 99,349 55,350 43,997 41,483 35,098 6,386 81,740 1.6 7.4 38.3 42.9 21.6 64.5 38.1 59.7 8.4 256.0 182.2 101.5 80.7 76.1 64.4 11.7 149.9 1.0 4.5 23.4 26.2 13.2 39.4 23.3 36.5 5.1 155.1 110.4 61.5 48.9 46.1 39.0 7.1 90.8
Type: Couple, with child(ren) 2019* 5,176 38,990 187,241 157,552 53,632 211,184 107,723 161,355 73,155 1,137,118 755,110 398,149 356,964 403,298 364,109 39,186 785,306 2.7 20.2 96.9 81.5 27.8 109.3 55.7 83.5 37.9 590.7 392.3 206.8 185.4 209.5 189.2 20.4 408.0 1.2 9.0 43.4 36.5 12.4 49.0 25.0 37.4 17.0 262.9 174.6 92.0 82.5 93.2 84.2 9.1 181.5
Type: Couple, no children 2019* 8,919 19,039 96,032 118,655 34,378 153,033 104,678 139,056 15,042 1,463,530 1,053,834 685,338 368,496 241,775 199,581 42,194 651,471 4.1 8.8 44.2 54.6 15.8 70.5 48.2 64.0 6.9 676.6 487.2 316.8 170.4 111.8 92.3 19.5 301.2 2.7 5.8 29.3 36.2 10.5 46.7 31.9 42.4 4.6 445.0 320.4 208.4 112.0 73.5 60.7 12.8 198.1
Other types of households 2019* 367 3,943 13,247 17,520 10,862 28,382 15,057 25,919 2,851 103,627 79,510 40,609 38,901 25,343 20,270 5,074 49,460 0.7 7.8 26.2 34.7 21.5 56.2 29.8 51.3 5.6 206.0 158.1 80.7 77.3 50.4 40.3 10.1 98.3 0.5 5.4 18.1 24.0 14.9 38.9 20.6 35.5 3.9 141.4 108.5 55.4 53.1 34.6 27.7 6.9 67.5
Source of income: mixed income 2019* 2,029 54,707 13,368 66,530 13,537 80,067 40,716 54,253 28,389 707,315 396,429 134,373 262,056 127,548 100,368 27,179 438,434 2.5 67.1 16.4 81.6 16.6 98.2 50.0 66.6 34.8 871.4 488.4 165.5 322.9 157.1 123.7 33.5 540.2 1.5 41.4 10.1 50.4 10.3 60.7 30.8 41.1 21.5 535.7 300.3 101.8 198.5 96.6 76.0 20.6 332.1
Source of income: compensation of employ 2019* 9,696 18,401 358,907 242,325 67,522 309,847 200,991 268,513 87,241 1,681,279 1,270,408 761,479 508,928 603,778 534,785 68,993 1,014,649 2.3 4.4 86.4 58.3 16.3 74.6 48.4 64.6 21.0 406.4 307.1 184.1 123.0 146.0 129.3 16.7 245.3 1.4 2.7 52.1 35.2 9.8 45.0 29.2 39.0 12.7 244.1 184.4 110.6 73.9 87.7 77.6 10.0 147.3
Source of income: old age benefits 2019* 7,734 2,386 2,812 65,590 45,701 111,291 75,969 121,670 -32,256 1,053,405 746,583 525,648 220,935 90,076 72,518 17,559 396,898 3.7 1.2 1.4 31.8 22.2 53.9 36.8 59.0 -15.6 512.7 363.3 255.8 107.5 43.8 35.3 8.5 193.2 3.0 0.9 1.1 25.5 17.7 43.2 29.5 47.2 -12.5 408.8 289.8 204.0 85.7 35.0 28.1 6.8 154.0
Source of income: other 2019* 824 2,076 3,720 22,311 15,597 37,908 29,946 45,543 -6,970 125,624 101,845 58,480 43,366 24,865 18,721 6,144 48,644 0.7 1.9 3.4 20.1 14.1 34.2 27.0 41.1 -6.3 113.8 92.3 53.0 39.3 22.5 17.0 5.6 44.1 0.6 1.4 2.6 15.6 10.9 26.4 20.9 31.8 -4.9 87.6 71.0 40.8 30.2 17.3 13.1 4.3 33.9
Main earner: to 35 years 2019* 1,608 12,331 74,464 62,868 19,793 82,661 61,330 81,123 8,711 156,776 86,816 26,250 60,567 115,868 100,087 15,782 185,828 0.9 7.2 43.5 36.8 11.6 48.3 35.9 47.4 5.1 92.1 51.0 15.4 35.6 68.0 58.8 9.3 109.1 0.7 5.4 32.8 27.7 8.7 36.4 27.0 35.7 3.8 69.0 38.2 11.5 26.6 51.0 44.0 6.9 81.7
Main earner: 35 to 50 years 2019* 3,315 28,432 143,504 118,745 40,246 158,991 93,159 133,405 42,463 696,537 448,203 212,347 235,856 321,500 297,320 24,180 569,834 1.7 14.3 72.4 59.9 20.3 80.2 47.0 67.3 21.4 352.9 227.1 107.6 119.5 162.9 150.6 12.3 288.7 0.9 8.1 40.9 33.9 11.5 45.4 26.6 38.1 12.1 198.7 127.9 60.6 67.3 91.7 84.8 6.9 162.6
Main earner: 50 to 65 years 2019* 6,978 29,620 151,060 135,646 33,113 168,759 108,007 141,120 50,954 1,477,662 1,090,129 679,285 410,844 287,433 242,256 45,176 674,966 3.2 13.4 68.3 61.4 15.0 76.3 48.8 63.8 23.0 671.0 495.0 308.5 186.6 130.5 110.0 20.5 306.5 1.9 8.3 42.2 37.9 9.2 47.1 30.1 39.4 14.2 412.3 304.2 189.6 114.6 80.2 67.6 12.6 188.4
Main earner: 65 years or older 2019* 8,382 7,187 9,779 79,497 49,205 128,702 85,126 134,331 -25,724 1,236,648 890,117 562,098 328,018 121,466 86,729 34,737 467,997 3.7 3.2 4.4 35.5 22.0 57.5 38.1 60.0 -11.5 555.0 399.5 252.3 147.2 54.5 38.9 15.6 210.0 2.9 2.5 3.4 27.8 17.2 45.1 29.8 47.1 -9.0 433.0 311.7 196.8 114.9 42.5 30.4 12.2 163.9
Home ownership: Owner-occupied home 2019* 20,564 59,823 293,076 289,311 82,377 371,688 234,851 317,228 78,849 3,092,747 2,068,155 1,221,260 846,894 813,178 716,318 96,860 1,837,770 4.7 13.7 67.1 66.3 18.9 85.2 53.8 72.7 18.1 711.4 475.7 280.9 194.8 187.1 164.8 22.3 422.7 2.8 8.2 40.0 39.5 11.3 50.8 32.1 43.3 10.8 422.4 282.5 166.8 115.7 111.1 97.8 13.2 251.0
Home ownership: Rent with rent subsidy 2019* -22 3,030 9,970 27,363 24,695 52,058 34,415 59,110 -7,370 76,223 75,954 39,201 36,753 5,943 1,161 4,782 6,212 0.0 2.3 7.7 21.1 19.0 40.1 26.5 45.5 -5.7 58.9 58.7 30.3 28.4 4.6 0.9 3.7 4.8 0.0 1.8 5.9 16.2 14.6 30.9 20.4 35.0 -4.4 45.2 45.0 23.2 21.8 3.5 0.7 2.8 3.7
Home ownership: Rent: no rent subsidy 2019* -308 13,745 73,031 74,038 28,947 102,985 70,976 99,923 6,728 374,059 348,352 210,861 137,491 25,523 8,097 17,426 51,230 -0.1 6.5 34.5 35.0 13.7 48.6 33.5 47.2 3.2 177.4 165.2 100.0 65.2 12.1 3.8 8.3 24.3 -0.1 4.9 25.9 26.3 10.3 36.5 25.2 35.4 2.4 132.6 123.5 74.8 48.7 9.0 2.9 6.2 18.2
Home ownership: Other 2019* 49 972 2,730 6,044 6,338 12,382 7,380 13,718 -1,803 24,594 22,804 8,658 14,147 1,623 816 807 3,413 0.1 2.7 7.6 16.9 17.7 34.5 20.6 38.3 -5.0 68.9 63.9 24.2 39.6 4.5 2.3 2.3 9.6 0.1 2.5 7.0 15.5 16.3 31.8 19.0 35.2 -4.6 63.2 58.6 22.2 36.3 4.2 2.1 2.1 8.8
Net worth: 1st 20%-group 2019* -372 4,787 38,449 40,136 23,146 63,282 44,683 67,829 -1,499 -21,020 52,653 15,533 37,120 90,841 47,314 43,527 17,168 -0.2 2.9 23.6 24.7 14.2 38.9 27.4 41.7 -0.9 -13.0 32.5 9.6 22.9 56.0 29.2 26.8 10.6 -0.2 2.4 19.0 19.8 11.4 31.2 22.0 33.4 -0.7 -10.4 26.0 7.7 18.3 44.8 23.3 21.5 8.5
Net worth: 2nd 20%-group 2019* 750 3,270 49,530 49,833 27,988 77,821 52,424 80,412 709 135,009 130,723 64,705 66,017 62,494 52,567 9,927 66,780 0.5 2.0 30.4 30.6 17.2 47.8 32.2 49.4 0.4 83.3 80.6 39.9 40.7 38.5 32.4 6.1 41.2 0.3 1.5 22.7 22.8 12.8 35.6 24.0 36.8 0.3 61.8 59.8 29.6 30.2 28.6 24.1 4.5 30.6
Net worth: 3rd 20%-group 2019* 3,542 7,889 86,757 75,671 28,565 104,236 68,955 97,520 14,262 395,211 287,555 180,962 106,592 187,693 174,518 13,175 295,349 2.2 4.8 53.3 46.5 17.5 64.0 42.4 59.9 8.8 243.7 177.3 111.6 65.7 115.8 107.6 8.1 182.2 1.4 3.1 34.2 29.8 11.3 41.1 27.2 38.4 5.6 155.7 113.3 71.3 42.0 73.9 68.8 5.2 116.4
Net worth: 4th 20%-group 2019* 6,971 16,560 95,508 93,627 31,431 125,058 81,556 112,987 20,015 824,260 508,670 342,130 166,541 222,909 209,271 13,639 538,499 4.3 10.2 58.7 57.5 19.3 76.8 50.1 69.4 12.3 508.4 313.7 211.0 102.7 137.5 129.1 8.4 332.1 2.6 6.2 35.5 34.8 11.7 46.5 30.3 42.0 7.4 306.2 189.0 127.1 61.9 82.8 77.7 5.1 200.0
Net worth: 5th 20%-group 2019* 9,392 45,064 108,563 137,489 31,227 168,716 100,004 131,231 42,917 2,234,163 1,535,664 876,650 659,015 282,330 242,722 39,607 980,829 5.8 27.7 66.7 84.5 19.2 103.6 61.4 80.6 26.4 1,377.9 947.1 540.7 406.4 174.1 149.7 24.4 604.9 3.4 16.2 39.1 49.6 11.3 60.8 36.1 47.3 15.5 805.3 553.6 316.0 237.6 101.8 87.5 14.3 353.6
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table describes the distribution of income, consumption, and wealth components of the sector households in the national accounts over different household groups. Households are identified by main source of income, living situation, household composition, age classes of the head of the household, income class by 20% groups, and net worth class by 20% groups.

Data available from: 2015.

Status of the figures:
Data of 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019 are provisional.

Changes as of September 10th 2021:
The figures of 2015-2018 are revised, because national accounts figures are changed due to the revision policy of Statistics Netherlands. For 2018 also microdata are added that were not available before. Results for 2019 are added to the table.

When will new figures be published?
New figures will be released in September 2022.

Description topics

Total amount
Income
Receipts from production, wages, social transfers, and property income. Compensation of employees are the wages received for labour, including the social contributions paid for by the employers. Gross operating surplus, gross mixed income and gross disposable income are balancing items. Social transfers in kind are also included, together with disposable income, this leads to the balancing item adjusted disposable income.
Gross operating surplus and mixed income
The surplus that remains after compensation of employees and taxes less subsidies on production and imports have been subtracted from the sum of value added at basic prices. For the self-employed (who are part of the sector households) the surplus is called mixed income, because it is partly a reward for their entrepreneurship compensation of labour.
The operating surplus of households equals housing services produced for own consumption by owner-occupiers.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.

Gross mixed income
Mixed income is for households mainly equal to the income earned by sole proprietors and other entrepreneurs personally liable for all gains and losses from their activities. The income earned has both an element of wage income as well as profit since the entrepreneur is both rewarded for the provided labour input as well as the undertaken risks. Included in mixed income are rentals received from letting real estate and income earned from black and illegal activities.
In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.
Compensation of employees
The compensation of employees is the total remuneration, in cash or in kind, payable by an employer to an employee in return for work done by the latter during an accounting period. The compensation of employees is equal to the sum of wages and salaries and employers' social contributions.
Gross disposable income
The sum of the gross disposable incomes of the institutional sectors. Gross national disposable income equals gross national income (at market prices) minus current transfers (current taxes on income, wealth et cetera, social contributions, social benefits and other current transfers) paid to non-resident units, plus current transfers received by resident units from the rest of the world. Because disposable national income is not a production concept but an income concept, it is usually expressed in net terms, i.e. after deduction of depreciation (consumption of fixed capital).
Social transfers in kind
Social transfers in kind consist of individual goods and services provided for free or at prices that are not economically significant to individual households by government units and NPISHs, whether purchased on the market or produced as non-market output by government units or NPISHs. They are financed out of taxation, other government income or social security contributions, or out of donations and property income in the case of NPISHs.
Gross adjusted disposable income
Adjusted disposable income is equal to disposable income of households including any income transfers in kind provided to households free of charge by general government or NPISH. This variable facilitates comparisons over time and across countries when there are differences or changes in economic and social conditions.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.
Expenditure
Expenditures on goods and services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs. This includes the social transfers in kind, which together with the individual expenditures result in actual individual final consumption.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that are households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government ‘consumes its own production’. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Actual individual consumption
Actual individual consumption of households equals social transfers in kind plus final consumption expenditure.
Gross saving
The portion of disposable income that has not been used for final consumption expenditure.
Wealth
Wealth components are assets, liabilities, and non-financial assets. The sum of these components equals net worth. Up to and including 2010 these data concern the households sector including the non-profit institutions serving households. From 2011 onwards these NPISH are no longer included.
Net worth
Net worth equals the financial assets minus the liabilities plus the non-financial assets.
Financial assets
Assets are possessions of households.
Total
Pension entitlements and claims
Pension entitlements and claims of pension funds on pension managers and entitlements to non-pension benefits
Pension entitlements comprise financial claims that current employees and former employees hold against either:
- their employers;
- a scheme designated by the employer to pay pensions as part of a compensation agreement between the employer and the employee
- an insurer.

Claims of pension funds on pension managers and entitlements to non-pension benefits
For the Netherlands this category only relates to claims of pension funds on pension managers, entitlements to non-pension benefits don’t occur here.
An employer may contract with a third party to look after the pension funds for his employees. If the employer continues to determine the terms of the pension schemes and retains the responsibility for any deficit in funding as well as the right to retain any excess funding, the employer is described as the pension manager and the unit working under the direction of the pension manger is described as the pension administrator. If the agreement between the employer and the third party is such that the employer passes the risks and responsibilities for any deficit in funding to the third part in return for the right of the third party to retain any excess, the third party becomes the pension manager as well as the administrator.
Other assets
Other assets are possessions of households excluding pension entitlements.
Financial liabilities
Liabilities are debts of households.
Total
Home mortgages; closing balance
Total of the home mortgages at the end of the period. These are long-term loans with as collateral the property itself which is occupied by the private person.

Other liabilities
Other liabilities are debts, excluding home mortgages.
Non-financial assets
Non-financial assets are objects which represent an economic value, on which property rights can be exerted and which do not have a financial character. In practice, this includes approximately all (non-financial) objects which can be sold. Examples of objects which cannot be sold are the sea and the air. Examples of assets which have a financial character are stocks and pensions. Non-financial assets consist of fixed assets, inventories, land and oil, gas reserves and consumer durables. The data relate to households including non-profit institutions serving households.
Average amount
Amount per household.
Income
Receipts from production, wages, social transfers, and property income. Compensation of employees are the wages received for labour, including the social contributions paid for by the employers. Gross operating surplus, gross mixed income and gross disposable income are balancing items. Social transfers in kind are also included, together with disposable income, this leads to the balancing item adjusted disposable income.
Gross operating surplus and mixed income
The surplus that remains after compensation of employees and taxes less subsidies on production and imports have been subtracted from the sum of value added at basic prices. For the self-employed (who are part of the sector households) the surplus is called mixed income, because it is partly a reward for their entrepreneurship compensation of labour.
The operating surplus of households equals housing services produced for own consumption by owner-occupiers.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.

Gross mixed income
Mixed income is for households mainly equal to the income earned by sole proprietors and other entrepreneurs personally liable for all gains and losses from their activities. The income earned has both an element of wage income as well as profit since the entrepreneur is both rewarded for the provided labour input as well as the undertaken risks. Included in mixed income are rentals received from letting real estate and income earned from black and illegal activities.
In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.
Compensation of employees
The compensation of employees is the total remuneration, in cash or in kind, payable by an employer to an employee in return for work done by the latter during an accounting period. The compensation of employees is equal to the sum of wages and salaries and employers' social contributions.
Gross disposable income
The sum of the gross disposable incomes of the institutional sectors. Gross national disposable income equals gross national income (at market prices) minus current transfers (current taxes on income, wealth et cetera, social contributions, social benefits and other current transfers) paid to non-resident units, plus current transfers received by resident units from the rest of the world. Because disposable national income is not a production concept but an income concept, it is usually expressed in net terms, i.e. after deduction of depreciation (consumption of fixed capital).
Social transfers in kind
Social transfers in kind consist of individual goods and services provided for free or at prices that are not economically significant to individual households by government units and NPISHs, whether purchased on the market or produced as non-market output by government units or NPISHs. They are financed out of taxation, other government income or social security contributions, or out of donations and property income in the case of NPISHs.
Gross adjusted disposable income
Adjusted disposable income is equal to disposable income of households including any income transfers in kind provided to households free of charge by general government or NPISH. This variable facilitates comparisons over time and across countries when there are differences or changes in economic and social conditions.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.
Expenditure
Expenditures on goods and services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs. This includes the social transfers in kind, which together with the individual expenditures result in actual individual final consumption.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that are households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government ‘consumes its own production’. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Actual individual consumption
Actual individual consumption of households equals social transfers in kind plus final consumption expenditure.
Gross saving
The portion of disposable income that has not been used for final consumption expenditure.
Wealth
Wealth components are assets, liabilities, and non-financial assets. The sum of these components equals net worth.
Net worth
Net worth equals the financial assets minus the liabilities plus the non-financial assets.
Financial assets
Assets are possessions of households.
Total
Pension entitlements and claims
Pension entitlements and claims of pension funds on pension managers and entitlements to non-pension benefits
Pension entitlements comprise financial claims that current employees and former employees hold against either:
- their employers;
- a scheme designated by the employer to pay pensions as part of a compensation agreement between the employer and the employee
- an insurer.

Claims of pension funds on pension managers and entitlements to non-pension benefits
For the Netherlands this category only relates to claims of pension funds on pension managers, entitlements to non-pension benefits don’t occur here.
An employer may contract with a third party to look after the pension funds for his employees. If the employer continues to determine the terms of the pension schemes and retains the responsibility for any deficit in funding as well as the right to retain any excess funding, the employer is described as the pension manager and the unit working under the direction of the pension manger is described as the pension administrator. If the agreement between the employer and the third party is such that the employer passes the risks and responsibilities for any deficit in funding to the third part in return for the right of the third party to retain any excess, the third party becomes the pension manager as well as the administrator.
Other assets
Other assets are possessions of households excluding pension entitlements.
Financial liabilities
Liabilities are debts of households.
Total
Home mortgages; closing balance
Total of the home mortgages at the end of the period. These are long-term loans with as collateral the property itself which is occupied by the private person.

Other liabilities
Other liabilities are debts, excluding home mortgages.
Non-financial assets
Non-financial assets are objects which represent an economic value, on which property rights can be exerted and which do not have a financial character. In practice, this includes approximately all (non-financial) objects which can be sold. Examples of objects which cannot be sold are the sea and the air. Examples of assets which have a financial character are stocks and pensions. Non-financial assets consist of fixed assets, inventories, land and oil, gas reserves and consumer durables. The data relate to households including non-profit institutions serving households.
Standardised amount
Amount per household converted to a single-person household.
Income
Receipts from production, wages, social transfers, and property income. Compensation of employees are the wages received for labour, including the social contributions paid for by the employers. Gross operating surplus, gross mixed income and gross disposable income are balancing items. Social transfers in kind are also included, together with disposable income, this leads to the balancing item adjusted disposable income.
Gross operating surplus and mixed income
The surplus that remains after compensation of employees and taxes less subsidies on production and imports have been subtracted from the sum of value added at basic prices. For the self-employed (who are part of the sector households) the surplus is called mixed income, because it is partly a reward for their entrepreneurship compensation of labour.
The operating surplus of households equals housing services produced for own consumption by owner-occupiers.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.
Gross mixed income
Mixed income is for households mainly equal to the income earned by sole proprietors and other entrepreneurs personally liable for all gains and losses from their activities. The income earned has both an element of wage income as well as profit since the entrepreneur is both rewarded for the provided labour input as well as the undertaken risks. Included in mixed income are rentals received from letting real estate and income earned from black and illegal activities.
In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.
Compensation of employees
The compensation of employees is the total remuneration, in cash or in kind, payable by an employer to an employee in return for work done by the latter during an accounting period. The compensation of employees is equal to the sum of wages and salaries and employers' social contributions.
Gross disposable income
The sum of the gross disposable incomes of the institutional sectors. Gross national disposable income equals gross national income (at market prices) minus current transfers (current taxes on income, wealth et cetera, social contributions, social benefits and other current transfers) paid to non-resident units, plus current transfers received by resident units from the rest of the world. Because disposable national income is not a production concept but an income concept, it is usually expressed in net terms, i.e. after deduction of depreciation (consumption of fixed capital).
Social transfers in kind
Social transfers in kind consist of individual goods and services provided for free or at prices that are not economically significant to individual households by government units and NPISHs, whether purchased on the market or produced as non-market output by government units or NPISHs. They are financed out of taxation, other government income or social security contributions, or out of donations and property income in the case of NPISHs.
Gross adjusted disposable income
Adjusted disposable income is equal to disposable income of households including any income transfers in kind provided to households free of charge by general government or NPISH. This variable facilitates comparisons over time and across countries when there are differences or changes in economic and social conditions.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used.
Expenditure
Expenditures on goods and services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs. This includes the social transfers in kind, which together with the individual expenditures result in actual individual final consumption.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that are households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government ‘consumes its own production’. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Actual individual consumption
Actual individual consumption of households equals social transfers in kind plus final consumption expenditure.
Gross saving
The portion of disposable income that has not been used for final consumption expenditure.
Wealth
Wealth components are assets, liabilities, and non-financial assets. The sum of these components equals net worth.
Net worth
Net worth equals the financial assets minus the liabilities plus the non-financial assets.
Financial assets
Assets are possessions of households.
Total
Pension entitlements and claims
Pension entitlements and claims of pension funds on pension managers and entitlements to non-pension benefits
Pension entitlements comprise financial claims that current employees and former employees hold against either:
- their employers;
- a scheme designated by the employer to pay pensions as part of a compensation agreement between the employer and the employee
- an insurer.

Claims of pension funds on pension managers and entitlements to non-pension benefits
For the Netherlands this category only relates to claims of pension funds on pension managers, entitlements to non-pension benefits don’t occur here.
An employer may contract with a third party to look after the pension funds for his employees. If the employer continues to determine the terms of the pension schemes and retains the responsibility for any deficit in funding as well as the right to retain any excess funding, the employer is described as the pension manager and the unit working under the direction of the pension manger is described as the pension administrator. If the agreement between the employer and the third party is such that the employer passes the risks and responsibilities for any deficit in funding to the third part in return for the right of the third party to retain any excess, the third party becomes the pension manager as well as the administrator.
Other assets
Other assets are possessions of households excluding pension entitlements.
Financial liabilities
Liabilities are debts of households.
Total
Home mortgages; closing balance
Total of the home mortgages at the end of the period. These are long-term loans with as collateral the property itself which is occupied by the private person.

Other liabilities
Other liabilities are debts, excluding home mortgages.
Non-financial assets
Non-financial assets are objects which represent an economic value, on which property rights can be exerted and which do not have a financial character. In practice, this includes approximately all (non-financial) objects which can be sold. Examples of objects which cannot be sold are the sea and the air. Examples of assets which have a financial character are stocks and pensions. Non-financial assets consist of fixed assets, inventories, land and oil, gas reserves and consumer durables. The data relate to households including non-profit institutions serving households.