Sector accounts; seasonally adjusted data, National Accounts

Sector accounts; seasonally adjusted data, National Accounts

Seasonal and working day adjustment Periods General government Final consumption expenditure (million euros) General government Gross fixed capital formation (million euros) General government Total revenue (million euros) General government Total expenditure (million euros) General government Balance general government sector (EMU) (million euros)
Original, unadjusted data 2022 2nd quarter* 59,712 7,154 107,030 103,734 3,296
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2022 2nd quarter* 58,724 7,308 105,421 99,841 5,580
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table provides an overview of some non-financial transactions and balancing items of the institutional sectors of the Dutch economy. The data is presented both seasonally and working day adjusted and unadjusted. Adjustments for seasonal effects and working day effects assist in the drawing of conclusions on quarter-to-quarter developments and help to reveal trends. The non-seasonally adjusted data are identical to (sums of) the non-consolidated data from the table 'current transactions by sector'. For total government revenue and expenditure the data are identical to sums of consolidated data.

Data available from first quarter 1999.

Status of the figures:
The figures from 1995 up to and including 2019 are final. Data of 2020, 2021 and 2022 are provisional.

Adjustments as of October 21st, 2022:
The latest seasonal and working day adjusted data for some time series in the period 1999-2009 were not included in this table. In this new version, these data are included.

Adjustments as of September 23rd, 2022:
Data on the second quarter of 2022 have been added.
The method for calculating the profits received from and paid to the rest of the world for non-financial corporations has been improved for the period from 1995 onwards. This impacts several key figures. As part of these profits pass through financial holdings, paid profits by financial institutions are also changed.

When will new figures be published?
The first quarterly estimate is available 85 days after the end of each reporting quarter. The first quarter may be revised in September, the second quarter in December. Should further quarterly information become available thereafter, the estimates for the first three quarters may be revised in March. If (new) annual figures become available in June, the quarterly figures will be revised again to bring them in line with the annual figures.

Description topics

General government
The general government sector primarily consists of all entities that exercise national executive, legislative and judiciary powers on a national or regional level. By this they have powers to raise taxes and other compulsory levies and to pass laws affecting the behaviour of economic units. In the Netherlands this concerns the State, municipalities, provinces, public water boards and the like. In the second place general government consists of entities that are controlled and mainly financed by the aforementioned entities, and do not produce for the market. Such entities are often established to carry out specific functions, such as road construction or the non-market production of health, education or research services. In this way, for instance, Prorail and the Open University are counted to the general government.
Government institutions that are active abroad, like embassies, belong to the general government sector as well. On the other hand foreign embassies and international institutions, like Europol and the International Court of Justice, do not belong to the Dutch government.

The Dutch Central Bank (DNB), the Dutch railways (NS), hospitals and power companies are not part of the general government sector. But also some independent governing bodies like the land registry (Kadaster). To some extent they are controlled by the government. However, their goods and services are largely financed through tariffs, and thus it is a case of market production.

The general government sector is split up into three subsectors: central government, local government and social security funds.

The principal economic functions of government are as follows:
- to provide goods and services to the community, either for collective consumption such as public administration, defence, and law enforcement, or individual consumption such as education, health, recreation and cultural services, and to finance their provision out of taxation or other incomes;
- to redistribute income and wealth by means of transfer payments such as taxes and social benefits;
- to engage in other types of non-market production.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that is households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licences.
Total revenue
The total revenue of general government is the sum of taxes, net social contributions, sales (defined as market output, output for own final use and payments for non-market production), other current revenues and capital transfer revenues.
Total expenditure
Total expenditure of the General Government includes the remuneration of employees, intermediate consumption, fixed capital formation, legal social insurance, social benefits, subsidies, benefits legal provision income property, other expenditure n.e.c. (taxes on production and not related to products, benefits directly by employers, other current transfers, capital transfers, balance buying and selling of non-produced non-financial assets).
Balance general government sector (EMU)
Balance between revenue and expenditure of the general government sector, presented as percentage of GDP. In the national accounts this equals net lending/net borrowing of the general government sector.
The balance of the general government sector (or EMU-balance) is an element of the Stability and Growth Pact. A positive figure indicates a surplus; a negative figure indicates a deficit.