Sector accounts; seasonally adjusted data, National Accounts

Sector accounts; seasonally adjusted data, National Accounts

Seasonal and working day adjustment Periods Total domestic sectors Gross domestic product (million euros) Total domestic sectors Gross operating surplus (million euros) Total domestic sectors Gross national income (million euros) Total domestic sectors Gross disposable income (million euros) Total domestic sectors Gross saving (million euros) Total domestic sectors Net lending (+) or net borrowing (-) (million euros) Non-financial corporations Value added (million euros) Non-financial corporations Gross operating surplus (million euros) Non-financial corporations Gross fixed capital formation (million euros) Non-financial corporations Compensation of employees (million euros) General government Final consumption expenditure (million euros) General government Gross fixed capital formation (million euros) General government Total revenue (million euros) General government Total expenditure (million euros) General government Balance general government sector (EMU) (million euros) Households including NPISHs Resources Compensation of employees (million euros) Households including NPISHs Resources Property income (million euros) Households including NPISHs Resources Social benefits in cash (million euros) Households including NPISHs Resources Other current transfers (million euros) Households including NPISHs Resources Adjustm. change in pension entitlements (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Final consumption expenditure (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Gross fixed capital formation (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Property income (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Current taxes on income and wealth (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Net social contributions (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Other current transfers (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Adjustm. change in pension entitlements (million euros) Households including NPISHs Gross operating surplus (million euros) Households including NPISHs Gross disposable income (million euros) Households including NPISHs Gross saving (million euros) Rest of the world Resources Imports of goods and services (million euros) Rest of the world Resources Received primary income (million euros) Rest of the world Resources Received current transfers (million euros) Rest of the world Resources Adjustm. change in pension entitlements (million euros) Rest of the world Resources Received capital transfers (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Exports of goods and services (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Paid primary income (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Paid current transfers (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Adjustm. change in pension entitlements (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Paid capital transfers (million euros)
Original, unadjusted data 2018 1st quarter 188,022 80,826 192,671 190,407 62,206 23,131 108,069 45,239 20,809 62,959 45,188 6,164 89,372 77,928 11,444 83,944 12,443 32,106 6,370 4,534 83,063 11,075 2,108 18,399 43,268 6,454 0 22,474 87,108 8,579 137,970 68,960 5,439 -50 326 158,849 73,609 3,175 0 238
Original, unadjusted data 2018 2nd quarter 196,711 73,767 194,088 193,170 59,192 15,553 113,888 38,853 21,433 75,357 47,956 6,358 85,303 85,267 36 99,874 16,955 35,524 6,618 6,995 86,071 12,506 2,145 14,734 49,493 6,478 0 22,641 108,762 29,686 143,110 80,854 5,192 -49 329 162,275 78,231 4,274 0 306
Original, unadjusted data 2018 3rd quarter 190,249 84,344 192,558 191,491 58,848 20,914 110,902 47,951 16,947 63,271 45,702 6,651 79,160 78,661 499 84,113 14,049 32,046 6,530 5,740 86,988 11,191 2,154 16,194 43,824 6,319 0 23,421 91,668 10,420 145,158 75,549 4,556 -47 173 164,685 77,858 3,489 0 273
Original, unadjusted data 2018 4th quarter 199,005 81,947 203,535 201,026 65,877 23,802 113,494 45,216 20,327 68,705 49,765 7,286 84,186 85,101 -915 93,546 14,591 32,127 6,418 4,994 85,438 12,198 2,194 18,792 45,768 6,209 0 24,331 98,050 17,606 147,594 69,659 6,169 -54 482 169,630 74,189 3,660 0 249
Original, unadjusted data 2019 1st quarter* 197,442 84,189 201,772 199,054 65,140 21,696 113,383 46,748 21,568 66,894 48,027 6,759 95,251 82,488 12,763 88,317 13,445 32,806 6,569 5,379 85,951 12,818 2,042 21,117 43,786 6,641 0 24,158 91,709 11,137 142,519 62,110 6,332 -64 436 162,802 66,440 3,614 0 222
Original, unadjusted data 2019 2nd quarter* 207,286 77,195 201,205 200,261 60,060 12,437 119,626 40,357 22,423 79,691 51,157 6,933 88,999 88,714 285 104,731 18,033 36,612 6,673 8,177 89,101 14,144 1,911 15,070 52,750 6,600 0 24,182 113,900 32,976 149,172 73,958 5,402 -57 336 168,618 67,877 4,458 0 301
Original, unadjusted data 2019 3rd quarter* 199,768 88,276 203,017 201,739 63,356 19,817 116,302 50,307 19,408 66,361 48,593 6,869 82,018 83,167 -1,149 87,648 15,177 32,848 6,669 7,190 89,849 12,526 1,489 16,981 46,555 6,560 0 24,343 95,100 12,441 149,270 65,070 5,311 -59 262 166,876 68,319 4,033 0 307
Original, unadjusted data 2019 4th quarter* 208,559 84,767 210,453 208,228 67,289 21,836 118,675 46,712 23,211 72,413 52,357 7,017 89,306 87,211 2,095 98,111 15,824 33,415 6,389 6,524 88,646 13,106 1,425 22,221 47,286 6,307 0 25,338 101,838 19,716 150,398 67,664 6,419 -64 503 172,781 69,558 4,194 0 293
Original, unadjusted data 2020 1st quarter* 201,819 84,986 203,975 198,422 62,121 17,398 115,414 46,603 23,488 69,940 50,089 6,764 95,713 86,067 9,646 92,716 13,001 34,865 6,394 5,102 86,282 13,362 1,521 24,821 42,802 6,460 0 25,078 96,450 15,270 141,457 67,457 9,727 -70 425 162,428 69,613 4,174 0 209
Original, unadjusted data 2020 2nd quarter* 191,724 74,860 187,065 184,889 55,525 11,028 107,760 38,416 19,891 80,415 50,353 6,983 82,467 103,259 -20,792 106,815 14,177 38,115 6,748 6,985 79,068 13,485 1,465 12,328 54,952 6,620 0 23,834 114,324 42,241 125,413 66,314 5,794 -57 265 143,271 61,655 3,618 0 245
Original, unadjusted data 2020 3rd quarter* 198,696 89,314 194,566 192,285 54,581 14,502 114,398 50,873 18,806 67,710 51,606 6,936 81,416 92,165 -10,749 90,321 13,636 35,286 6,314 6,642 86,154 12,592 1,235 18,315 46,290 6,113 0 25,678 99,282 19,770 133,771 66,192 5,589 -56 230 154,293 62,062 3,308 0 303
Original, unadjusted data 2020 4th quarter* 207,856 87,268 200,575 196,801 57,562 12,654 117,664 49,056 21,633 75,869 55,585 7,883 91,430 102,952 -11,522 103,409 13,136 35,104 6,576 6,316 83,721 13,295 1,085 23,159 47,703 6,046 0 25,520 105,752 28,347 139,007 65,673 7,881 -67 536 162,935 58,392 4,107 0 250
Original, unadjusted data 2021 1st quarter* 201,249 89,987 202,718 199,906 67,608 22,560 116,003 51,224 22,971 70,719 51,624 7,001 93,631 96,671 -3,040 94,264 12,835 35,773 6,738 5,590 80,744 14,146 1,137 22,021 45,587 6,634 0 26,284 100,515 25,361 138,665 59,901 6,836 -70 258 162,546 61,370 4,024 0 233
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2018 1st quarter 190,870 79,491 192,649 191,140 60,114 19,032 109,826 43,842 20,516 66,256 46,565 6,355 83,820 79,943 3,877 88,721 13,919 32,756 6,343 5,308 84,462 11,106 2,108 17,847 44,002 6,323 0 22,697 94,375 15,808 140,924 71,013 4,974 -46 326 160,477 73,979 3,531 0 238
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2018 2nd quarter 192,113 80,023 193,395 192,412 60,835 20,690 111,082 44,195 20,327 67,081 46,434 6,455 84,308 81,027 3,281 89,512 14,709 32,745 6,536 5,570 85,155 11,809 2,145 10,953 50,951 6,352 0 23,205 95,714 16,351 141,793 77,375 5,414 -50 329 161,828 77,679 3,561 0 306
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2018 3rd quarter 194,623 80,444 197,197 195,276 62,278 22,578 112,298 44,419 19,293 68,241 47,453 6,638 85,727 81,745 3,982 91,340 14,643 33,085 6,536 5,666 85,796 11,690 2,154 18,799 44,273 6,338 0 23,292 97,254 16,650 146,131 75,949 5,269 -51 173 167,534 78,036 3,730 0 273
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2018 4th quarter 196,794 81,296 199,586 197,276 62,924 21,317 113,364 44,843 19,355 68,821 48,270 6,973 84,685 84,154 531 91,992 14,703 33,222 6,520 5,728 86,208 12,376 2,194 20,619 43,269 6,434 0 23,674 98,256 17,124 145,090 70,745 5,667 -53 482 165,693 74,146 3,756 0 249
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2019 1st quarter* 200,315 82,890 201,736 199,904 62,920 18,074 115,251 45,331 21,240 70,312 49,251 6,993 88,760 84,587 4,173 93,177 15,101 33,477 6,547 6,156 87,327 12,855 2,042 20,658 44,462 6,466 0 24,380 99,291 19,107 145,956 63,654 5,682 -59 436 165,116 66,812 3,922 0 222
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2019 2nd quarter* 202,058 83,251 200,403 199,305 61,913 16,544 116,473 45,748 21,209 70,899 49,640 7,012 88,098 84,529 3,569 94,006 15,545 33,770 6,587 6,739 88,109 13,404 1,911 11,080 54,154 6,517 0 24,740 100,254 19,328 147,532 71,192 5,746 -59 336 167,699 67,438 3,833 0 301
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2019 3rd quarter* 204,185 83,892 208,064 205,628 66,595 21,111 117,538 46,604 22,110 71,646 50,406 6,862 88,864 86,246 2,618 95,212 15,795 33,938 6,669 7,103 88,633 13,053 1,489 19,709 46,800 6,615 0 24,229 100,940 18,537 149,701 65,420 6,243 -63 262 169,122 68,451 4,361 0 307
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2019 4th quarter* 206,519 84,363 206,289 204,387 64,520 19,715 118,700 46,433 22,112 72,608 50,908 6,735 90,168 86,220 3,948 96,443 16,011 34,491 6,493 7,283 89,527 13,287 1,425 23,964 45,035 6,537 0 24,671 102,079 18,851 147,834 68,527 5,911 -63 503 168,671 69,459 4,322 0 293
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2020 1st quarter* 204,152 83,092 204,114 199,742 59,914 13,168 117,001 45,228 23,191 73,424 51,231 6,991 88,599 88,187 412 97,701 14,849 35,572 6,377 5,855 87,655 13,407 1,521 24,595 43,438 6,323 0 25,301 104,249 24,118 144,474 68,471 9,177 -65 425 164,253 69,961 4,603 0 209
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2020 2nd quarter* 186,952 81,729 185,867 183,288 57,332 16,422 104,943 43,834 18,570 71,133 48,813 7,037 81,590 99,132 -17,542 95,660 11,428 35,214 6,661 5,568 78,002 12,712 1,465 8,004 56,338 6,459 0 24,386 100,174 28,254 124,784 64,415 5,931 -59 265 143,581 61,347 2,670 0 245
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2020 3rd quarter* 203,381 84,797 199,987 196,539 57,862 15,703 115,653 47,037 21,569 73,336 53,474 6,930 88,582 95,190 -6,608 98,268 14,275 36,431 6,309 6,544 84,913 13,142 1,235 21,243 46,472 6,160 0 25,575 105,407 25,684 134,084 66,459 6,468 -60 230 156,503 62,119 3,621 0 303
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2020 4th quarter* 205,503 86,601 196,069 192,653 54,703 10,522 117,566 48,841 20,410 76,114 54,131 7,615 92,632 101,887 -9,255 101,646 13,387 36,145 6,683 7,089 84,678 13,478 1,085 24,789 45,506 6,323 0 24,849 106,007 27,202 135,986 66,268 7,506 -66 536 158,187 58,286 4,356 0 250
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2021 1st quarter* 203,858 88,302 203,175 201,620 65,361 17,887 117,745 49,878 22,786 74,332 52,774 7,228 85,896 98,875 -12,979 99,432 14,841 36,518 6,725 6,313 82,135 14,193 1,137 22,026 46,223 6,455 0 26,502 108,565 34,937 142,214 60,394 6,148 -65 258 165,026 61,671 4,366 0 233
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table provides an overview of some non-financial transactions and balancing items of the institutional sectors of the Dutch economy. The data is presented both seasonally and working day adjusted and unadjusted. Adjustments for seasonal effects and working day effects assist in the drawing of conclusions on quarter-to-quarter developments and help to reveal trends. The non-seasonally adjusted data are identical to (sums of) the non-consolidated data from the table 'current transactions by sector'. For total government revenue and expenditure the data are identical to sums of consolidated data.

Data available from first quarter 1999.

Status of the figures:
The figures from 1995 up to and including 2018 are final. Data of 2019, 2020 and 2021 are provisional.

Changes as of June 24th, 2021:
Data on the first quarter of 2021 have been added.
Following revision policy, 2019 and 2020 data are updated, and time series of the financial account and balances are revised (annual revision).
Data in the current account of government finance statistics are adjusted for the time period 1995 - 2020. Mixed income of households 2017 and 2018 is adjusted based on final data on the income of self-employed. For the total economy there are no adjustments, data by institutional sector are adjusted. This is reflected in adjustments for among others value added by institutional sector.

When will new figures be published?
The first quarterly estimate is available 85 days after the end of each reporting quarter. The first quarter may be revised in September, the second quarter in December. Should further quarterly information become available thereafter, the estimates for the first three quarters may be revised in March. If (new) annual figures become available in June, the quarterly figures will be revised again to bring them in line with the annual figures.

Description topics

Total domestic sectors
The domestic sectors consist of non-financial corporations, financial corporations, general government, households and non-profit institutions (NPI) serving households. The breakdown into institutional sectors is based on international rules.
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product (GDP) is a quantity that expresses the size of an economy. The volume change of GDP during a reference period expresses the growth or shrinkage of the economy. Gross domestic product at market prices is the final result of the production activity of resident producer units. It can be defined in three ways:

- production approach: GDP is the sum of gross value added of the various institutional sectors or the various industries plus taxes and less subsidies on products (which are not allocated to sectors and industries). It is also the balancing item in the total economy production account;
- expenditure approach: GDP is the sum of final uses of goods and services by resident institutional units (final consumption and gross capital formation), plus exports and minus imports of goods and services;
- income approach: GDP is the sum of uses in the total economy generation of income account (compensation of employees, taxes on production and imports less subsidies, gross operating surplus and mixed income of the total economy).

Net domestic product at market prices (NDP) can be obtained by deducting consumption of fixed capital from GDP.

Gross operating surplus
The surplus that remains after compensation of employees and taxes less subsidies on production and imports have been subtracted from the sum of value added at basic prices. For the self-employed (who are part of the sector households) the surplus is called mixed income, it is partly a reward for their entrepreneurship compensation for their labour.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used. Depreciation must be paid for from the gross operating surplus.
Gross national income
Total primary income received by resident institutional units: compensation of employees, operating surplus / mixed income (gross), net property income and net taxes on production and imports less subsidies. Incomes flowing from one domestic sector to another have no effect on net national income. Gross national income (at market prices) equals GDP minus primary income paid by resident institutional units to non-resident institutional units plus primary income received by resident institutional units from the rest of the world. The division of payments by member states to the European Union is largely based upon differences in gross national income.

National income is not a production concept but an income concept, which is more significant if expressed in net terms, i.e. after deduction of consumption of fixed capital.
Gross disposable income
The sum of the gross disposable incomes of the institutional sectors. Gross national disposable income equals gross national income (at market prices) minus current transfers (current taxes on income, wealth et cetera, social contributions, social benefits and other current transfers) paid to non-resident units, plus current transfers received by resident units from the rest of the world. Because disposable national income is not a production concept but an income concept, it is usually expressed in net terms, i.e. after deduction of depreciation (consumption of fixed capital).
Gross saving
The portion of national disposable income that has not been used for final consumption expenditure.
Net lending (+) or net borrowing (-)
Net lending (+) or net borrowing (-) is the balancing item on the current and the capital account. This balancing item equals the balance of transactions on the financial account; a deficit on the current and capital account is financed by new liabilities and/or the sale of financial assets. In case of a surplus, liabilities are repaid and/or financial assets acquired.
Net lending or net borrowing for the total economy is equal to the balance on the current and the capital account of all institutional sectors. The balance of the financial account for the total economy shows the amount of net lending to or borrowing from the rest-of-the-world.
Non-financial corporations
The non-financial corporations sector consists of institutional units which are independent legal entities and market producers, and whose principal activity is the production of goods and non-financial services.
Non-financial corporations include:
- all corporations, quasi-corporations and co-operative organisations which do not belong to the financial corporations.
- all non-profit institutions which do not pertain to the other sectors. Examples are old people's homes, hospitals and housing corporations.
- public enterprises, which are fully or partly owned by the government, like Dutch Rail-ways (NS).
Value added
The value of all goods and services produced (production value or output), minus those that have been intermediately used upon production (intermediate consumption). Value added is rated at basic prices: purchaser's prices minus trade and transport margins and taxes on products paid and plus subsidies on products received. Intermediate consumption is rated at purchaser's prices minus non-deductible VAT.
Included is the output by all kind-of-activity units residing in the Netherlands, also those that are held by foreign owners.
Gross operating surplus
The surplus that remains after compensation of employees and taxes less subsidies on production and imports have been subtracted from the sum of value added at basic prices. For the self-employed (who are part of the sector households) the surplus is called mixed income, it is partly a reward for their entrepreneurship compensation for their labour.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used. Depreciation must be paid for from the gross operating surplus.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licences.
Compensation of employees
The compensation of employees is the total remuneration, in cash or in kind, payable by an employer to an employee in return for work done by the latter during an accounting period. The compensation of employees is equal to the sum of wages and salaries and employers' social contributions.
General government
The general government sector primarily consists of all entities that exercise national executive, legislative and judiciary powers on a national or regional level. By this they have powers to raise taxes and other compulsory levies and to pass laws affecting the behaviour of economic units. In the Netherlands this concerns the State, municipalities, provinces, public water boards and the like. In the second place general government consists of entities that are controlled and mainly financed by the aforementioned entities, and do not produce for the market. Such entities are often established to carry out specific functions, such as road construction or the non-market production of health, education or research services. In this way, for instance, Prorail and the Open University are counted to the general government.
Government institutions that are active abroad, like embassies, belong to the general government sector as well. On the other hand foreign embassies and international institutions, like Europol and the International Court of Justice, do not belong to the Dutch government.

The Dutch Central Bank (DNB), the Dutch railways (NS), hospitals and power companies are not part of the general government sector. But also some independent governing bodies like the land registry (Kadaster). To some extent they are controlled by the government. However, their goods and services are largely financed through tariffs, and thus it is a case of market production.

The general government sector is split up into three subsectors: central government, local government and social security funds.

The principal economic functions of government are as follows:
- to provide goods and services to the community, either for collective consumption such as public administration, defence, and law enforcement, or individual consumption such as education, health, recreation and cultural services, and to finance their provision out of taxation or other incomes;
- to redistribute income and wealth by means of transfer payments such as taxes and social benefits;
- to engage in other types of non-market production.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that is households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licences.
Total revenue
The total revenue of general government is the sum of taxes, net social contributions, sales (defined as market output, output for own final use and payments for non-market production), other current revenues and capital transfer revenues.
Total expenditure
Total expenditure of the General Government includes the remuneration of employees, intermediate consumption, fixed capital formation, legal social insurance, social benefits, subsidies, benefits legal provision income property, other expenditure n.e.c. (taxes on production and not related to products, benefits directly by employers, other current transfers, capital transfers, balance buying and selling of non-produced non-financial assets).
Balance general government sector (EMU)
Balance between revenue and expenditure of the general government sector, presented as percentage of GDP. In the national accounts this equals net lending/net borrowing of the general government sector.
The balance of the general government sector (or EMU-balance) is an element of the Stability and Growth Pact. A positive figure indicates a surplus; a negative figure indicates a deficit.
Households including NPISHs
Households including non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH)
The households sector consists of individuals or groups of individuals as consumers and as entrepreneurs producing market goods and non-financial and financial services (market producers) provided that the production of goods and services is not by separate entities treated as quasi-corporations. It also includes individuals or groups of individuals as producers of goods and non-financial services for exclusively own final use.
The sector households includes all natural persons who are resident for more than one year in the Netherlands, irrespective of their nationality. On the other hand Dutch citizens who stay abroad for longer than one year do not belong to the Dutch sector households.
The sector households does not only cover independently living persons, but also persons in nursing homes, old people's homes, prisons, boarding schools, etc. If persons are entrepreneurs, their business also belongs to the sector households. This is the case for self-employed persons (one-man business). Large autonomous unincorporated enterprises (quasi-corporations) are included in the sector non-financial or financial corporations.

The non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) sector consists of non-profit institutions which are separate legal entities, which serve households and which are private non-market producers. Their principal resources are voluntary contributions in cash or in kind from households in their capacity as consumers, from payments made by general government and from property income.
Examples are religious organisations, charity organisations, political parties, trade unions and cultural, sports and recreational organisations.
Resources
Resources are transactions add to the economic value of sectors.
Compensation of employees
The compensation of employees is the total remuneration, in cash or in kind, payable by an employer to an employee in return for work done by the latter during an accounting period. The compensation of employees is equal to the sum of wages and salaries and employers' social contributions.
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Social benefits in cash
Social benefits other than social transfers in kind is made up of three sub-headings:
- social security benefits in cash
- other social insurance benefits
- social assistance benefits in cash.
Other current transfers
Other current transfers consist of non-life insurance premiums, non-life insurance claims, current transfers within general government, current international co-operation and miscellaneous current transfers.
Adjustm. change in pension entitlements
Since households are treated in the financial accounts as owners of the pension entitlements an adjustment item is necessary to ensure that any excess of contributions to pension schemes over pension benefits does not affect household savings. This adjustment is equal to the difference between net pension contributions (including imputed contributions) and pension benefits.
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that is households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licences.
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Current taxes on income and wealth
Current taxes on income and wealth of corporations consist of corporation tax and dividend tax. These taxes are based on the profits of corporations.
Current taxes on income and wealth of households include all taxes, which are periodically imposed on income and wealth, such as the income tax, the wage tax and the tax on net wealth of individuals. Non-periodical levies, such as inheritance tax are defined as capital transfers. Several types of taxes are simultaneously seen as taxes on production and imports when imposed on producers and as taxes on income and wealth when imposed on consumers. For instance, motor vehicle tax is a tax on production when it is imposed on company cars and it is a tax on income and wealth and imports when it is imposed on cars for private use.
The treatment of dividend tax results from the recording of dividends. Because dividends are recorded gross, i.e. before deduction of dividend tax, dividend tax is in all cases recorded at the receiving sector. The same applies for the dividend tax to and from the rest of the world.
Net social contributions
Social contributions include social security contributions, private social contributions (among which contributions to pension schemes) and imputed social contributions. Employers, employees, self-employed persons and non-active persons pay these contributions. Actually, the employers' part is paid directly to the insurers. However, in the national accounts, the employers' contributions are supposed to be part of primary income of households (i.e. the income from direct participation in the production process). Therefore, in first instance these contributions are treated as payments by employers to households as compensation of employees, who are deemed to pay them to the insurers in the income account.
Other current transfers
Other current transfers consist of non-life insurance premiums, non-life insurance claims, current transfers within general government, current international co-operation and miscellaneous current transfers.
Adjustm. change in pension entitlements
Since households are treated in the financial accounts as owners of the pension entitlements an adjustment item is necessary to ensure that any excess of contributions to pension schemes over pension benefits does not affect household savings. This adjustment is equal to the difference between net pension contributions (including imputed contributions) and pension benefits.
Gross operating surplus
The surplus that remains after compensation of employees and taxes less subsidies on production and imports have been subtracted from the sum of value added at basic prices. For the self-employed (who are part of the sector households) the surplus is called mixed income, it is partly a reward for their entrepreneurship compensation for their labour.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used. Depreciation must be paid for from the gross operating surplus.
Gross disposable income
The sum of the gross disposable incomes of the institutional sectors. Gross national disposable income equals gross national income (at market prices) minus current transfers (current taxes on income, wealth et cetera, social contributions, social benefits and other current transfers) paid to non-resident units, plus current transfers received by resident units from the rest of the world. Because disposable national income is not a production concept but an income concept, it is usually expressed in net terms, i.e. after deduction of depreciation (consumption of fixed capital).
Gross saving
The portion of national disposable income that has not been used for final consumption expenditure.
Rest of the world
The rest of the world sector is a grouping of units without any characteristic functions and resources; it consists of non-resident units insofar as they are engaged in transactions with resident institutional units, or have other economic links with resident units. Its accounts provide an overall view of the economic relationships linking the national economy with the rest of the world. The institutions of the EU and international organisations are included.
The rest of the world is not a sector for which complete sets of accounts have to be kept, but it is convenient to treat the rest of the world as a sector. Sectors are obtained by disaggregating the total economy to obtain more homogeneous groups of resident institutional units, which are similar in respect to their economic behaviour, objectives and functions. This is not the case for the rest of the world sector: for this sector, there are recorded the transactions and other flows of non-financial and financial corporations, non-profit institutions, households and general government with non-resident institutional units and other economic relationships between residents and non-residents, e.g. claims by residents on non-residents.
Resources
Resources are transactions add to the economic value of sectors.
Imports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from non-residents to residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Received primary income
Compensation of employees, property income and (EU) taxes on production and imports received by the rest of the world from the Netherlands.
Received current transfers
Current taxes on income and wealth, social contributions, social benefits in cash and other current transfers received by rest of the world from the Netherlands.
Adjustm. change in pension entitlements
Since households are treated in the financial accounts as owners of the pension entitlements an adjustment item is necessary to ensure that any excess of contributions to pension schemes over pension benefits does not affect household savings. This adjustment is equal to the difference between net pension contributions (including imputed contributions) and pension benefits.
Received capital transfers
Capital transfers received by the rest of the world from the Netherlands.

Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Exports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Paid primary income
Compensation of employees, property income and (EU) subsidies paid from the rest of the world to the Netherlands.
Paid current transfers
Current taxes on income and wealth, social contributions, social benefits in cash and other current transfers paid from rest of the world to the Netherlands.
Adjustm. change in pension entitlements
Since households are treated in the financial accounts as owners of the pension entitlements an adjustment item is necessary to ensure that any excess of contributions to pension schemes over pension benefits does not affect household savings. This adjustment is equal to the difference between net pension contributions (including imputed contributions) and pension benefits.
Paid capital transfers
Capital transfers paid from the rest of the world to the Netherlands.