Gross fixed capital formation in tangible assets; changes; 2005-2018

Gross fixed capital formation in tangible assets; changes; 2005-2018

Periods Year on year volume changes (%)
2017 July* 11.5
2017 August* 8.4
2017 September* 5.0
2017 October* 9.6
2017 November* 10.6
2017 December* 0.2
2018 January* 14.3
2018 February* 2.7
2018 March* 5.4
2018 April* 11.1
2018 May* 2.7
2018 June* 6.8
2018 July* 6.2
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


The results are the year-on-year changes in the volume of gross fixed capital formation in tangible assets by companies, households, non-profit institutions and government. All expenditure by companies, households, non-profit institutions and government on tangible assets which are used for more than one year in the production process are regarded as fixed capital formation in tangible assets. Fixed capital formation in intangible assets, like software, licenses etc., is not taken into account.

Data available from 2005 January up to and including 2018 July .

Status of the figures:
The figures on 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 are provisional. The other figures are definite. Since this table has been discontinued, the provisional data will not become final.

Changes as of 22 October 2018:
None. This table has been discontinued.
Statistics Netherlands has carried out a revision of the national accounts. New statistical sources and estimation methods have been used during the revision. Therefore this table has been replaced by table Gross fixed capital formation in tangible assets; volume figures. For further information see section 3.


When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore.

Description topics

Year on year volume changes
Volume changes relative to one year previously (%). Volume changes reflect the development of gross fixed capital formation
adjusted for price developments.

Gross fixed capital formation:
The purchase of a resource which may be used in a production process and is not immediately used up. The purchase may concern a building or a machine like a blast furnace. This in contrast with goods and services which disappear during the production process, like iron ore, the so-called intermediate use. According to international standards a good or a service is considered as fixed capital if it lasts over a year in a production process. Although not immediately used up, fixed capital does lose its initial value in time, because of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. To take this into account, producers must depreciate their fixed assets. The value of newly acquired fixed capital before depreciation is called 'gross fixed capital formation'. After depreciation it is called 'net fixed capital formation'.

The following types of fixed capital exist: dwellings, machinery, equipment, means of transportation, weapon systems, computers and cultivated biological resources. A more extensive list of fixed capital is found in article 3.124 and further of the European System of Accounts 2010.