Environmental accounts; water use and abstraction 2003 - 2011

Environmental accounts; water use and abstraction 2003 - 2011

Waterusers Periods Tap water use (mln m3) Use of groundwater Total use of groundwater (mln m3) Use of groundwater Use of groundwater for cooling (mln m3) Use of groundwater Other use of groundwater (mln m3) Use of surface water (mln m3)
Total of all water users 2011* 1,080.3 991.9 63.7 928.2 15,300.2
Total private households 2011* 783.0 . . . .
A-U All economic activities 2011* 297.3 . . . .
A Agriculture, forestry and fishing 2011* 42.7 88.5 0.0 88.5 30.9
B Mining and quarrying 2011* 2.3 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.8
C Manufacturing 2011* 142.6 141.2 63.5 77.8 3,391.0
10-12 Manufacture of food and beverages 2011* 38.2 66.6 24.2 42.4 165.9
20 Manufacture of chemicals 2011* 37.4 12.1 3.9 8.2 2,109.8
D Electricity and gas supply 2011* 12.0 5.3 0.0 5.3 10,928.2
E Water supply and waste management 2011* 2.7 756.7 0.1 756.6 949.3
36 Water collection and distribution 2011* 0.2 755.8 - 755.8 473.2
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table presents the water accounts, being part of the environmental accounts compiled by Statistics Netherlands annually. This Water Accounting table includes the (physical) water use by the Dutch economic activities. A distinction is made between the use of tap water, use and abstraction (withdrawal)of groundwater and of surface water. The water used is allocated to the industries and households. Alternatively, tables selections can be made that show break down by economic activity (including households), by water type and annual use. Data in the environmental accounts directly correspond to the economic data in the national accounts, that allow assessment of the impact of the economic performance of the Netherlands for the use of water taken from the natural environment in quantitative terms. From the water accounts bills, environmental indicators can be derived. As an example the water use intensity for the different types can be determined for the Netherlands as a whole or for the break down by industry.

Data available from: 2003 - 2011

Status of the figures:
The data in this table for the last year are provisional. Figures for the other years are final.Because this table is discontinued, figures will not be updated anymore.

Changes as of November 12, 2014:
None, this table is discontinued.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore. This table is replaced by table: Environmental accounts; water use and abstraction. See paragraph 3.

Description topics

Tap water use
Water from the tap of drinking water quality produced by the water supply companies and provided to households and businesses.
Tap water is purified groundwater or surface water and transported through a network of pipes.
The use of so-called 'other water' is not included.
‘Other water’, (incl. ‘industrial water’) is water of different quality compared to tap water. This may be partially treated water, for instance, pre-treated surface water, or water that has been optimised to the needs of the business market, for instance, distilled and demineralised water.
As part of the environmental accounts, on an annual basis Water Accounts are compiled. Part of these accounts is the (physical) use of water by the different economic activities.
In here a distinction is made between the use of tap water and abstraction (withdrawal) of groundwater and of surface water.
The total water use is subsequently allocated to the various industries and households.
Use of groundwater
Use of water abstracted and eventual pumped from the subsurface. This can be fresh, brackish or salt water.
Total use of groundwater
Use of water pumped or otherwise abstracted from underground formations. This may be fresh water, but can also be brackish or salt water.
Use of groundwater for cooling
Use of abstracted groundwater for cooling purposes.
Other use of groundwater
Use of abstracted groundwater for other than cooling purposes.
Use of surface water
Use of water abstracted from inland waters such as rivers, lakes, canals (except for groundwater), transitional waters, coastal waters and, in respect of the chemical status, also should include territorial waters (i.e. the sea).