GDP, output and expenditures; value, Quarterly National Accounts

GDP, output and expenditures; value, Quarterly National Accounts

Type of data Periods Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Gross domestic product (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Imports of goods (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Disposable for final expenditure Imports of goods and services Imports of services (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure Households including NPISHs (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Final consumption expenditure General government (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Gross fixed capital formation Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Gross fixed capital formation Enterprises and households (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Gross fixed capital formation General government (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure National final expenditure Changes in inventories incl. valuables (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Total (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Exports of goods (million euros) Expenditure approach to GDP Final expenditure Exports of goods and services Exports of services (million euros)
Prices of 2021 2021 1,575,412 891,550 683,862 495,280 188,582 1,575,412 804,667 606,798 380,427 226,371 184,425 154,014 30,411 13,444 770,745 560,235 210,510
Prices of 2021 2022 1st quarter* 396,102 224,611 171,491 120,238 51,253 396,102 205,132 153,141 98,936 54,205 47,625 40,355 7,270 4,366 190,970 135,237 55,733
Prices of 2021 2022 2nd quarter* 421,269 241,853 179,416 126,291 53,125 421,269 217,699 162,113 103,103 59,010 50,633 43,264 7,369 4,953 203,570 142,107 61,463
Prices of 2021 2022 3rd quarter* 410,631 230,003 180,628 124,732 55,896 410,631 209,445 159,284 103,420 55,864 44,022 36,697 7,325 6,139 201,186 140,302 60,884
Prices of 2021 2022 4th quarter* 421,827 239,725 182,102 132,167 49,935 421,827 212,780 161,525 101,361 60,164 48,436 40,891 7,545 2,819 209,047 151,586 57,461
Prices of 2021 2022 1,649,829 936,192 713,637 503,428 210,209 1,649,829 845,056 636,063 406,820 229,243 190,716 161,207 29,509 18,277 804,773 569,232 235,541
Prices of 2021 2023 1st quarter* 405,667 228,824 176,703 123,807 52,914 405,667 205,444 157,442 102,098 55,334 50,287 42,998 7,290 -1,960 199,788 142,631 56,996
Prices of 2021 2023 2nd quarter* 419,701 241,033 178,678 125,114 53,716 419,701 215,233 163,999 103,958 60,045 52,065 44,601 7,464 -562 204,328 142,505 61,842
Prices of 2021 2023 3rd quarter* 399,247 228,414 171,477 116,491 55,430 399,247 203,637 160,548 102,709 57,861 44,106 36,472 7,632 -645 195,610 135,217 60,567
Prices of 2021 2023 4th quarter* 411,891 238,600 173,911 124,338 50,024 411,891 211,445 164,014 101,295 62,754 46,748 39,030 7,716 757 200,918 143,656 57,618
Prices of 2021 2023* 1,636,420 936,890 700,614 489,596 212,078 1,636,420 835,717 646,016 410,078 235,997 193,207 163,104 30,102 -2,352 800,458 563,797 237,023
Prices of 2021 2024 1st quarter* 397,423 227,490 169,869 117,032 53,030 397,423 205,497 160,400 103,451 56,957 48,067 41,072 6,996 -2,696 191,652 133,681 57,973
Current prices 2021 1,575,412 891,550 683,862 495,280 188,582 1,575,412 804,667 606,798 380,427 226,371 184,425 154,014 30,411 13,444 770,745 560,235 210,510
Current prices 2022 1st quarter* 427,312 235,168 192,144 140,001 52,143 427,312 213,289 158,754 101,964 56,790 49,741 42,132 7,609 4,794 214,023 155,784 58,239
Current prices 2022 2nd quarter* 474,037 251,303 222,734 166,643 56,091 474,037 232,084 170,067 109,119 60,948 53,507 45,705 7,802 8,510 241,953 176,318 65,635
Current prices 2022 3rd quarter* 473,620 247,025 226,595 166,869 59,726 473,620 229,690 171,704 112,116 59,588 47,394 39,488 7,906 10,592 243,930 177,402 66,528
Current prices 2022 4th quarter* 490,072 260,324 229,748 176,646 53,102 490,072 231,502 178,820 114,248 64,572 52,780 44,510 8,270 -98 258,570 195,655 62,915
Current prices 2022 1,865,041 993,820 871,221 650,159 221,062 1,865,041 906,565 679,345 437,447 241,898 203,422 171,835 31,587 23,798 958,476 705,159 253,317
Current prices 2023 1st quarter* 466,978 257,132 209,846 152,323 57,523 466,978 230,059 177,570 115,972 61,598 54,922 46,939 7,983 -2,433 236,919 173,463 63,456
Current prices 2023 2nd quarter* 483,858 271,527 212,331 152,720 59,611 483,858 243,125 184,513 118,246 66,267 57,407 49,126 8,281 1,205 240,733 170,416 70,317
Current prices 2023 3rd quarter* 464,266 263,943 200,323 138,617 61,706 464,266 235,110 184,610 118,931 65,679 49,428 40,834 8,594 1,072 229,156 160,436 68,720
Current prices 2023 4th quarter* 478,481 274,997 203,484 148,174 55,310 478,481 240,068 188,579 118,032 70,547 52,787 44,048 8,739 -1,298 238,413 172,627 65,786
Current prices 2023* 1,893,583 1,067,599 825,984 591,834 234,150 1,893,583 948,362 735,272 471,181 264,091 214,544 180,947 33,597 -1,454 945,221 676,942 268,279
Current prices 2024 1st quarter* 465,931 272,600 193,331 133,226 60,105 465,931 240,493 187,947 120,728 67,219 55,253 47,185 8,068 -2,707 225,438 157,531 67,907
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table explanation


This table provides data from Quarterly National Accounts (QNA) of Statistics The Netherlands. It contains quarterly and annual data on production, expenditures, income and external economic transactions of The Netherlands.

Data available from 1995.

Status of the figures:
Annual data of the period 1995-2022 are final. Quarterly data from 2022 are provisional.

Adjustment as of July 12th 2024:
Data of gross fixed capital formation by type of capital good and by destination in the period 1995-2021 are adjusted due to an error in the original calculation.

When will new figures be published?
The preliminary estimate (flash estimate) of a quarter is released within 45 days. The second estimate is published after 85 days. At the second estimate of the fourth quarter, data of the previous three quarters will also be revised. If (new) annual figures become available in June, the quarterly figures will be revised again to bring them in line with the annual figures. Please note that there is a possibility that adjustments might take place at the end of March or September, in order to provide the European Commission with the latest figures.

Description topics

Expenditure approach to GDP
The way GDP is formed by underlying components in the so-called expenditure approach. In this approach the components are consumption by households, consumption by the general government, gross fixed capital formation, changes in inventories and exports, minus imports. Changes in inventories are included for consistency with the production approach. From the 2010 edition of the European System of Accounts onwards these changes are added to fixed capital formation. Consumption, fixed capital formation and changes in inventories add up to the so-called national final expenditure. By adding exports final expenditure is obtained. Intermediate consumption, goods and services used upon production, is not part of final expenditure.
Disposable for final expenditure
The total amount of domestic generated goods and services (GDP) and the imported goods and services are adding up to the disposable for final expenditure. This variable is by definition equal to the total final expenditure, which is the sum of the National final expenditure and the exports of goods and services.
Total
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product (GDP) is a quantity that expresses the size of an economy. The volume change of GDP during a reference period expresses the growth or shrinkage of the economy. Gross domestic product at market prices is the final result of the production activity of resident producer units. It can be defined in three ways:

- production approach: GDP is the sum of gross value added of the various institutional sectors or the various industries plus taxes and less subsidies on products (which are not allocated to sectors and industries). It is also the balancing item in the total economy production account;
- expenditure approach: GDP is the sum of final uses of goods and services by resident institutional units (final consumption and gross capital formation), plus exports and minus imports of goods and services;
- income approach: GDP is the sum of uses in the total economy generation of income account (compensation of employees, taxes on production and imports less subsidies, gross operating surplus and mixed income of the total economy).

Net domestic product at market prices (NDP) can be obtained by deducting consumption of fixed capital from GDP.
Imports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from non-residents to residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Total
Imports of goods
Transactions in goods (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from non-residents to residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners. Part of the imports are raw materials, semi-finished products, fuel and fixed assets. Furthermore, imports of goods may be re-exports: goods that were imported before being exported, after having received at most minor adaptations.
Imports of services
Transactions in services (sales, barter and gifts) from non-residents to residents (in the Netherlands). Imports of services applies among others to expenses made by Dutch companies abroad, like costs of transportation, banking costs and business travels. Imports by services are also made by the Dutch general government, among others by means of expenses made by Dutch embassies and consulates. Imports of services by households consist among others of imports of consumer goods and the direct consumptive expenditure by Dutch residents abroad.
Final expenditure
The sum of the National final expenditure and the exports of goods and services. This variable is by definition equal to the disposable final expenditure (GDP and imports).
Total
National final expenditure
The sum of the consumption of households and the government, gross fixed capital formation and changes in inventories.
Total
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that is households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Total
Households including NPISHs
Consumption expenditure by households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs). Not all expenses made by households are seen as consumptive, households may invest as well. These investments mainly concern the purchase of houses and substantial costs on maintenance. Small costs on maintenance, indoor painting and the purchase of furniture is classified as consumption. This also applies to the purchase of cars and car maintenance.
General government
Consumption expenditure by the general government sector. The output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. Purchases by general government of goods and services produced by market producers that are supplied to households as social transfers in kind are part of government consumption as well. Examples of this in the Netherlands are health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.

Government output consumed by the government is classified into collective consumption and individual consumption. Collective consumption by the government consists of services for collective consumption that are provided simultaneously to all members of the community. Examples of this are expenses on defense, environmental health or public governance. Individual consumption is made up of expenses that serve only part of the community. This concerns mainly education.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licenses.

Total
Enterprises and households
Gross fixed capital formation of (financial or non-financial) corporations and households and the sector households including non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs). Fixed capital formation by households concerns houses, but also investments by the self-employed.
General government
Gross fixed capital formation of the sector general government. Fixed capital formation by the general government concerns e.g. investments in public infrastructure, research and development and weapon systems.
Changes in inventories incl. valuables
Changes in inventories including acquisitions less disposals of valuables
Changes in the stock of raw materials, semi-finished products, work-in-progress (unfinished works like ships or oil rigs) and finished products still held by the producer. Changes in stock do not include progress made in construction. Positive changes in inventories arise when products are finished in the reference period but not yet sold. Alternatively, they arise when goods are purchased for intermediate consumption but not yet used. Negative changes in inventories arise when goods from stocks have been sold, or used in the production process. A more extensive list of changes in inventories is found in article 3.146 and further of the European System of Accounts 2010.

In measuring changes in inventories, changes in prices during the reference period are not allowed to have any effect. The initial and final inventory is therefor valued at the same price. Raw materials are valued at the price of purchase. Final products are valued at the selling price. Work-in-progress is valued at the cost-price.

Acquisitions less disposals of valuables This transaction consists of the acquisitions less disposals of precious stones, non-monetary gold, antiques, art objects and jewelry, that are acquired and held primarily as stores of value. In the national accounts this transaction is mostly combined with changes in inventories.
Exports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Total
Exports of goods
Transactions in goods (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners. Part of the exports of goods are re-exports: goods that were imported before being exported, after having received at most minor adaptations.
Exports of services
Transactions in services (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. Exports of services include among others the following cases: transportation by resident carriers abroad, harbor services and ship maintenance to non-residents, works performed abroad by resident contractors. Expenses made in the Netherlands by foreign tourists, diplomats and cross-border workers.