Environmental and ec. key figures; national accounts, 2001-2013

Environmental and ec. key figures; national accounts, 2001-2013

Economic activities and other items Periods Environmental burden Net energy consumption (PJ) Environmental burden Tap water use (mln m3) Environmental burden Waste (mln kg) Environmental burden Emissions to water Heavy metals (1 000 heavy metal-equivalents) Environmental burden Emissions to water Nutrients (1 000 nutrient-equivalents) Environmental burden Air emissions Greenhouse gases (Climate change) (mln greenhousegas-equivalents) Environmental burden Air emissions Acidifying substances (Acidification) (bln acid-equivalents) Environmental burden Air emissions Ozone layer depletion (1 000 CFK12-equivalents) Environmental burden Air emissions Fine dust (mln kg) Environment and macro-economic figures Revenues environmental taxes and levies (mln euros) Environment and macro-economic figures Macro-economic key figures Labour input of employed persons (1 000 years of employment) Environment and macro-economic figures Macro-economic key figures Value added from the output Value at current prices Output basic prices (mln euros) Environment and macro-economic figures Macro-economic key figures Value added from the output Value at prices of 2010 Output at basic prices (mln euros)
Total 2011 3,527 1,080.3 . 416 68,538 229,103 28.7 133.0 39.6 23,873 7,099 1,238,414 1,209,761
Total 2012 3,554 1,070.4 . 385 74,390 228,332 28.2 125.3 38.1 22,858 7,059 1,244,749 1,193,338
Total 2013* 3,540 . . . . 228,425 28.3 123.7 37.8 23,013 6,962 1,236,446 1,184,441
Total Dutch economy 2011 3,527 1,080.3 . 132 37,950 229,103 20.3 133.0 35.9 23,812 7,099 1,238,414 1,209,761
Total Dutch economy 2012 3,554 1,070.4 . 136 37,352 228,332 20.0 125.3 34.5 22,795 7,059 1,244,749 1,193,338
Total Dutch economy 2013* 3,540 . . . . 228,425 20.1 123.7 34.3 22,952 6,962 1,236,446 1,184,441
A-U All economic activities 2011 2,845 298.6 . 44 15,880 185,111 18.4 115.5 26.9 8,491 7,099 1,236,753 1,208,123
A-U All economic activities 2012 2,853 287.4 . 45 15,554 183,783 18.1 111.5 25.9 7,926 7,059 1,243,083 1,191,724
A-U All economic activities 2013* 2,826 . . . . 182,846 18.2 111.1 25.8 7,991 6,962 1,234,776 1,182,839
Total private households 2011 682 781.8 . 83 20,203 39,995 1.9 3.4 8.9 15,321
Total private households 2012 701 783.0 . 84 20,273 40,749 1.9 0.4 8.5 14,869
Total private households 2013* 715 . . . . 41,988 1.8 0.0 8.4 14,961
Other domestic origin 2011 6 1,868 3,876 0.0 14.2 0.0
Other domestic origin 2012 8 1,526 3,630 0.0 13.3 0.0
Other domestic origin 2013* . . 3,420 0.0 12.6 0.0
Total from abroad 2011 . 283 30,588 0 8.4 0.0 3.7 61
Total from abroad 2012 . 248 37,038 0 8.3 0.0 3.6 63
Total from abroad 2013* . . . 0 8.3 0.0 3.6 66
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table contains key figures from the environmental accounts and the National Accounts. It shows contributions to various environmental issues such as global warming, acidification, environmental costs and environmental taxes by industries. In addition, some economic characteristics of the National accounts are included for comparison, e.g. gross value added and the number of employee jobs converted to full-time equivalents.
The environmental accounts are consistent with the concepts and definitions of the National Accounts. This implies that, for physical material flows, the direct relationship with the Dutch economy is the focal point. Material flows are attributed to the economic activities where the actions actually take place, they are registered according to the residence principle. This means that all air pollution caused by Dutch transport companies is taken into account for the Netherlands, but that air pollution caused by transport companies from abroad within the Dutch territory is not.
The environmental accounts are based on figures from the environmental statistics. These data are based on the territory principle, however, everything that happens within the Dutch territory. Because of the consistency between the environmental accounts and the National Accounts, Dutch environmental indicators can be compared directly to the main economic indicators. Due to the difference in approach between environmental accounts and environmental statistics, results may vary somewhat.

Data available from: 2001-2013

Status of the figures:
his table contains figures from various sources. For figures related to the National Accounts: most recent reference period has status Provisional, whereas the reference period prior to that has the status Revised Provisional. After two years the data become Definite. Data for 2001-2010 are still regarded as Provisional, as the Dutch National Accounts are currently being revised to comply with the European System of National and Regional Accounts 2010 (ESR 2010). Data based on the environmental accounts will be revised over a longer period of time, because of adjustments in the data sources used. This to maintain the closest relation possible to the environmental statistics.

Changes as of 8 June 2016:
This table is discontinued.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable. This table is discontinued.

Description topics

Environmental burden
Physical data relating to the environmental burden. Subjects include emissions to air and water, waste and the depletion of natural resources.
Net energy consumption
Energy used for economic processes, not usable in the short-term for other energetic purposes.

Net energy use is the combination of final energy use for energy purposes (use of fuels for transport) and non-energy purposes (use of naphtha in manufacturing of plastics) plus the conversion losses of energy (for example energy losses that occur when coal and gas are converted into electricity in power plants).
Tap water use
Use of water from the tap of drinking water quality produced by the water supply companies. Tap water is purified groundwater or surface water transported through a network of pipes.
Waste
Waste categories are categorised according to the European Regulation on Waste Statistics. Waste with and without a commercial value (waste products and waste residuals) for the producer are taken into account.
Emissions to water
Pollutants originating from a source. Emissions can be divided into direct and indirect emissions. Direct emissions are emitted directly into the environment. Indirect emissions reach the environment in an indirect way. Part of the discharges to the sewer system, for example, reach the surface water after treatment in wastewater treatment plants.
Heavy metals
Heavy metals belong to a group of metals with a high atomic weight. Particularly heavy metals that are highly toxic and therefore harmful to the environment are taken into account. Heavy metals naturally occur in the environment. In many cases they are necessary for natural processes, but they usually are toxic in higher concentrations. The figures include arsenic.
The individual substances have the following corresponding weights in the equivalent:
Zinc: 1/30
Lead: 1/25
Chromium: 1/25
Arsenic: 1/10
Copper: 1/3
Cadmium: 5
Mercury: 100/3
Nutrients
Phosphorus and Nitrogen are nutrients. These nutrients are essential for the growth of plants and animals, but an excessive use of fertilizers has damaging effects on biodiversity and ecosystems. As a rule, it results in domination of one or only a few species of plants or animals. This process is called eutrophication. In surface water, an excess amount of nutrients results in limitless algae growth and finally in total domination of blue-green alga.
Air emissions
Emissions of pollutants into the air.
Greenhouse gases (Climate change)
Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere retain part of the solar heat that reaches the earth. An increasing concentration of greenhouse gases means that more warmth is retained and the temperature of the earth's surface rises. This is called the "enhanced greenhouse effect". The most important greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), laughing gas (N2O), HFCs, PFCs and SF6.
Acidifying substances (Acidification)
Measure used to determine to what degree a substance contributes to the acidification of the environment. The conversion to acidifying equivalents is based on the extent to which the different acidifying pollutants affect the environment.

One acidification equivalent is equal to one mole H+. The emission of one kg NOx is equal to 21.7 acidification equivalents, the emission of one 1 kg SO2 is equal to 31.3 acidification equivalents, and the emission of one 1 kg NH3 is equal to 58.8 acidification equivalents.
Ozone layer depletion
Depletion of the ozone layer as a result of emissions of CFCs and halons to air, in CFC12 equivalents. Emissions of CFCs and halons can be converted to CFC12 equivalents. The conversion factors are based on the extent to which the different CFCs and halons affect the ozone layer.
Fine dust
Particulate matter (PM10 = particulates with diameter smaller than 10 micrometres).

Among other causes PM10 is formed during the combustion of diesel fuel (diesel fumes) and various industrial processes. Fine dust is detrimental to health, as it penetrates deeply into the lungs.
Environment and macro-economic figures
Key figures relating to the environment and the economy.
Revenues environmental taxes and levies
Total revenues from environmental levies and environmental taxes.

Environmental levies are imposed by the government to finance specific environmental measures. Environmental taxes are taxes intended to reduce human activities that harm the environment, by raising prices. The revenues from environmental taxes go into the general government revenue and are not used to finance specific environmental policies. Examples of environmental taxes are excise on motor fuels, road tax, the tax on cars and motorcycles and energy tax.
Macro-economic key figures
Macro-economics is the branch of economics that studies 'aggregates'. Aggregates are economic indicators that apply to large groups, for instance to all construction companies or all households or to the Netherlands as a whole. Examples of macro-economic indicators are GDP, labour volume, consumption, investments and international trade.
Labour input of employed persons
The input of labour based on the average number of employee jobs in a year. Labour input is calculated by converting all jobs (full-time and part-time) in a year to full-time equivalents (FTE). Two part-time jobs of 0.5 FTE will count as 1 working year in the yearly average labour volume.
Value added from the output
The way value added is formed by underlying components in the so-called production approach. In this approach value added equals the sum of value added over all branches (including non-commercial ones). Value added is thereby registered at basic prices, the way they are perceived by producers.
Value at current prices
The values are expressed at prices of the reporting period. Alternatively, values may be expressed at constant prices. In that case, prices of a certain reference period are used.
Output basic prices
The ensemble of goods and services produced. Also called production. Three types of output are distinguished:
- market output: goods and services sold at a market or intended for sale at a market
- the own-account production of all goods that are retained by their producers for their own final consumption or gross fixed capital formation.
- non-market output: goods and services delivered for free or at economically non-significant prices to other units

Output is valued at basic prices. These are the prices experienced by the producers: product-related taxes have been subtracted from the original prices, subsidies haven been added to them. Costs of transportation, when charged separately by the producer, are not included. Changes in the values of financial and non-financial assets during the reference period are not included either.

Included is the output by all kind-of-activity units residing in the Netherlands, including those that are held by foreign owners. The kind-of-activity units include general government units and other non-commercial units.
Value at prices of 2010
The values are expressed at prices of the reference period 2010 by taking account of inflation. If prices are not corrected for inflation, values are expressed at prices of the reporting period (current prices).
Output at basic prices
The ensemble of goods and services produced. Also called production. Three types of output are distinguished:
- market output: goods and services sold at a market or intended for sale at a market
- the own-account production of all goods that are retained by their producers for their own final consumption or gross fixed capital formation.
- non-market output: goods and services delivered for free or at economically non-significant prices to other units

Output is valued at basic prices. These are the prices experienced by the producers: product-related taxes have been subtracted from the original prices, subsidies haven been added to them. Costs of transportation, when charged separately by the producer, are not included. Changes in the values of financial and non-financial assets during the reference period are not included either.

Included is the output by all kind-of-activity units residing in the Netherlands, including those that are held by foreign owners. The kind-of-activity units include general government units and other non-commercial units.