Social protection benefits by functions, criteria, implementation 1994-2012

Social protection benefits by functions, criteria, implementation 1994-2012

Periods Total social protection benefits (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Sickness/Health care (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Disability (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Old age (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Survivors (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Family (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Unemployment (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Housing (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Education (mln euro) Functions social protection benefits Social exclusion not mentioned above (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Decision-making Government-controlled schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Decision-making Non-government-controlled schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Legal enforcement Compulsory schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Legal enforcement Non-compulsory schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Establishment of entitlements Contributory schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Establishment of entitlements Non-contributory schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Scope Universal schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Scope General schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Scope Special schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Level of protection Basic schemes (mln euro) Criteria for social protection benefits Level of protection Supplementary schemes (mln euro) Implementation Directly through employers (mln euro) Implementation Pension funds / Insurance companies (mln euro) Implementation Soc. benefits ind. non-market producers (mln euro) Implementation Sector Government (mln euro)
1995 92,888 25,129 11,110 28,581 4,933 4,040 8,756 1,215 4,633 4,492 76,381 16,507 91,677 1,211 38,916 53,972 38,869 20,705 33,314 73,058 19,830 7,627 14,829 2,613 67,819
2000 105,071 30,311 12,150 38,279 5,575 4,716 5,310 1,545 1,746 5,439 81,039 24,032 104,813 258 54,581 50,490 40,606 20,410 44,055 82,641 22,430 9,347 20,576 3,113 72,035
2005 135,103 40,931 13,002 49,864 7,018 6,490 8,150 1,712 1,653 6,283 103,485 31,618 134,039 1,064 70,712 64,391 52,202 24,650 58,251 104,743 30,360 10,492 28,018 3,735 92,858
2008 161,953 55,841 14,091 57,373 7,169 7,026 6,159 2,164 1,769 10,361 125,981 35,972 156,887 5,066 85,099 76,854 55,340 62,300 44,313 120,140 41,813 9,849 31,097 4,100 116,907
2009 171,930 59,648 14,305 59,614 7,083 7,413 8,259 2,151 1,756 11,701 134,976 36,954 166,458 5,472 89,989 81,941 57,944 68,444 45,542 127,819 44,111 9,931 31,869 4,458 125,672
2010 179,230 62,582 14,445 62,572 7,250 7,286 9,177 2,241 1,669 12,008 140,715 38,515 173,554 5,676 94,596 84,634 60,092 72,190 46,948 133,218 46,012 9,943 33,538 4,456 131,293
2011 184,082 65,059 14,158 64,558 7,309 7,235 8,755 2,319 1,659 13,030 144,613 39,469 178,640 5,442 96,199 87,883 62,249 74,048 47,785 136,366 47,716 9,670 34,471 4,642 135,299
2012* 189,856 67,739 13,974 67,388 7,409 6,591 10,107 2,326 1,671 12,651 149,235 40,621 184,998 4,858 98,255 91,601 63,559 77,132 49,165 141,076 48,780 9,344 35,744 4,630 140,138
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table gives an overview of the social protection benefits available in the Netherlands. Social protection benefits are classified as all benefits that fall under social services, social security laws, pension insurance, social benefits paid directly by employers and social benefits in kind paid by the government to families. The benefits concern both benefits in kind and cash benefits.

Social protection benefits protect recipients against certain risks or provide in certain needs. These risks and needs are grouped into nine functions. The social protection schemes are also classified by five criteria and eleven underlying categories, as laid down in the European System of Social Protection Statistics (ESSPROS) programme. This programme aims to improve the comparability of international social protection statistics. The function "Education" is not a part of social protection in the sense of ESSPROS.
However, this function is included in the table to provide a complete picture of social protection in the Netherlands. Lastly the benefits are classified by the sector providing the benefit.

In line with the regulations in the European System of Accounts (ESA95), benefits are recorded when they are claimed (accrual-based recording), not when they are paid (cash-based recording).

Data available from 1994 to 2012.

Status of the figures:
The figures in this table are definite up to 2010, revised provisional for 2011 and provisional for 2012. Because this table is discontinued, figures will not be updated anymore.

Changes as of 10 April 2015.
None, this table is discontinued.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore.

Description topics

Total social protection benefits
Social protection encompasses all interventions by public or private
bodies intended to relieve households and individuals of the burden of a
defined set of risks or needs, provided that the recipient does not have
to do anything in return, and that no individual arrangement is involved.
---
Support in cash or kind in aid of education is included in the social
protection benefits. This function is not included in social protection as
defined by Eurostat for international comparisons, but is included in
social benefits as defined in the National Accounts. To ensure
compatibility with the National Accounts, this function has now been
added.
Functions social protection benefits
Social protection encompasses all interventions by public or private
bodies intended to relieve households and individuals of the burden of a
defined set of risks or needs, provided that the recipient does not have
to do anything in return, and that no individual arrangement is involved.
The functional classification of social protection benefits arranges the
social protection schemes according to this set of risk and needs
(functions). If a scheme fulfils more than one function, the benefit is
divided over these functions. The sum of the benefits in all the
functions adds up to the total amount of benefits paid by all social
protection schemes in the year concerned.
Sickness/Health care
To ensure income and financial support in the case of physical or
mental illness, excluding disability. Health care is care intended to
maintain, restore or improve the health of the people protected
irrespective of the origin of the disorder.
Disability
To ensure income and support in cash or kind (except health care) in the
case of incapacity of physically or mentally disabled people to engage in
economic and social activities.
Old age
To ensure income and support in cash or kind (except health care) in
the case of old age.
Survivors
To ensure income and support in cash or kind in the case of the death of
a family member.
Family
Support in cash or kind (except health care) for costs of pregnancy,
childbirth and adoption, bringing up children and caring for other family
members.
Unemployment
To ensure income and support in cash or kind in connection with
unemployment.
Housing
Help towards the cost of housing.
Education
Support in cash or kind in connection with obtaining an education.
Social exclusion not mentioned above
Benefits in cash or kind (except health care) specifically intended to
combat social exclusion, where not covered by one of the other
functions.
Criteria for social protection benefits
Social protection encompasses all interventions by public or private
bodies intended to relieve households and individuals of the burden of a
defined set of risks or needs, provided that the recipient does not have
to do anything in return, and that no individual arrangement is involved.
The social protection schemes can be arranged according to criteria. For
each criterion the schemes are placed into two or more categories. A
scheme falls into one category for each criterion. The sum of the
categories within a criterion adds up to the total amount of benefits paid
by all social protection schemes.
Decision-making
Decision-making refers to the unit that takes the most important
decisions: the level of benefits, the terms on which they are paid and
the ways in which the scheme is financed. Schemes may be
government-controlled or non-government-controlled.
Government-controlled schemes
Government-controlled schemes consist of social protection schemes in
which the government takes all the principal decisions about the level of
benefits, the terms on which they are paid and the ways in which the
scheme is financed.
Government-controlled social protection is usually established by law or
regulation. It includes all schemes that provide protection to public
servants on the same lines as that provided to the general population by
government-controlled schemes, but excludes schemes that the government
may set up in its role of employer and which have no government-controlled
counterparts in the private sector. These schemes are classified as non-
government-controlled schemes for employees.
Non-government-controlled schemes
Non-government-controlled schemes for employees are social protection
schemes organised (but not necessarily run) by employers for their
employees, former employees and their dependants. Other
non-government-controlled schemes are not organised particularly for
employees.
Legal enforcement
Legal enforcement refers to the rules laid down in legislation concerning
the membership of the protected subjects. Membership of a social
protection scheme may be compulsory or non-compulsory. The concepts
compulsory and non-compulsory are interpreted from the point of view of
the persons protected.
Compulsory schemes
Compulsory schemes are social protection schemes where membership is made
compulsory by the government.
Non-compulsory schemes
Non-compulsory schemes are all social protection schemes where membership
is not made compulsory by government.
Establishment of entitlements
Establishment of entitlements refers to the basis on which the protected
person is eligible for benefits: conditional or not conditional on
payment of contributions.
Contributory schemes
Contributory schemes are social protection schemes that require the
payment of contributions, by the protected persons or by other parties on
their behalf, in order to secure individual entitlement to benefits.
Non-contributory schemes
Non-contributory schemes are social protection schemes in which
eligibility to benefits is not conditional on the payment of
contributions by the protected persons or by other parties on their
behalf.
Scope
Scope of the scheme refers to the part of the population that is
protected (the whole population, all or the majority of workers or
specific sections of the population).
Universal schemes
Universal schemes are schemes which apply to the whole population;
i.e. all residents or nationals, irrespective of social or occupational
status, are eligible to receive social benefits upon
materialisation of specific risks or needs. A typical universal scheme is
the old age pension scheme (AOW).
General schemes
General schemes are those which apply to the total or the majority of the
economically active population. A typical general scheme is the
unemployment benefit scheme (AWW).
Special schemes
Special schemes are schemes designed to protect a specific, restricted
section of the population. A typical special scheme is the military
pensions scheme.
Level of protection
Level of protection refers to whether social protection schemes offer a
basic or a supplementary level of protection.
Basic schemes
Basic schemes are social protection schemes that guarantee a basic level
of protection. A basic level of protection means the lowest level of
protection (based on the number of years of contributions/employment
and/or residency), without it strictly being understood as the level of
resources allowing only the minimum socially acceptable standard of
living. Basic old age pension schemes, for instance, typically guarantee
either a flat-rate pension and/or a limited percentage of former earnings
which may or may not be supplemented by other provisions. The term 'first
pillar' is often used for basic schemes.
Supplementary schemes
Supplementary schemes are social protection schemes that:
- top up cash benefits granted by the basic scheme, or;
- extend the coverage of the basic scheme, or;
- replace the basic scheme where conditions for entitlement to the basic
scheme are not fulfilled.
The term 'second pillar' is often used for supplementary schemes.
Implementation
The sector providing the social protection benefit.
Example 1: If a government employee falls ill, his salary will still be
paid by his employer (the government). This is called paid sick-leave.
After 2 years of illness, he will be eligible for the legal social
insurance benefit WIA. Benefits under the WIA are implemented by the
Institute for Employee Benefit schemes (UWV), which is a part of the
sector government.
Example 2: At the moment a person retires, he will receive his AOW pension
from the SVB, which is part of the sector government. If this person is
also entitled to an additional pension benefit, this additional pension
will be paid out by the Pension funds sector.
Directly through employers
Payments made directly by employers to their employees, with regard to
social protection benefits. For example paid sick-leave. No
distinction is made between the sectors that the employers operate in.
Pension funds / Insurance companies
Pension funds collect premiums and pay employee pensions. They are also
responsible for pensions for surviving relatives and disability
pensions. Insurance companies were responsible for industry-related
health care insurance until 2006.
Soc. benefits ind. non-market producers
Social benefits paid by individual non-market producers.
Direct services by government to families, which are not a part of social
benefits in kind or in cash as defined in the National Accounts. For
example vaccinations at local health clinics.
Sector Government
The sector government implements all social benefits in cash and in kind
provided to private persons. These are provided by central and local
government under social insurance and assistance legislation.