Energy balance sheet; supply, transformation and consumption, 1995-2013

Energy balance sheet; supply, transformation and consumption, 1995-2013

Balance sheet items Sectors Periods Energy commodities petajoule Total energy commodities (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Coal and coal products Total coal and coal products (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Coal and coal products Primary coals (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Coal and coal products Coal products Total coal products (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Coal and coal products Coal products Coke-oven cokes (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Coal and coal products Coal products Coke oven gas (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Coal and coal products Coal products Blast furnace gas (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Coal and coal products Coal products Coal tar (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Total crude and petroleum products (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Crude Total crude (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Crude Crude oil (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Crude Natural gas liquids (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Crude Other hydrocarbons (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Total petroleum products (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Residual gases (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Lpg (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Naphtha (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Motor gasoline (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Kerosene (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Gas/diesel oil (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Heavy fuel oil (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Lubricants (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Bitumen (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Crude and petroleum products Petroleum products Other petroleum products (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Natural gas (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Total renewable energy (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Wind energy (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Hydro power (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Solar energy (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Geothermal, deep (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Biomass Total biomass (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Biomass Biogenic municipal waste (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Biomass Solid and liquid biomass (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Renewable energy Biomass Biogas (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Nuclear energy (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Waste and other energy commodities (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Electricity (PJ) Energy commodities petajoule Heat (PJ)
Primary energy consumption Netherlands total 1995 2,965.08 374.54 386.35 -11.80 -12.57 - - 0.77 997.22 2,658.14 2,400.45 275.52 -17.83 -1,660.93 - 36.49 -84.15 -269.69 -241.77 -629.03 -438.92 -18.96 -10.89 -4.01 1,450.51 35.50 1.14 0.32 0.20 - 33.84 15.45 12.85 5.53 43.13 23.16 41.01 -
Primary energy consumption Netherlands total 2000 3,066.70 328.56 329.07 -0.51 -2.83 - - 2.32 1,074.36 2,628.81 2,351.83 295.25 -18.27 -1,554.45 - 14.70 -74.05 -242.44 -280.21 -585.27 -372.83 -19.43 -11.52 16.60 1,469.05 53.18 2.98 0.51 0.48 - 49.21 25.51 17.55 6.14 40.50 32.94 68.09 -
Primary energy consumption Netherlands total 2005 3,315.95 342.10 343.51 -1.42 -4.75 - - 3.33 1,254.17 2,692.61 2,243.54 443.49 5.59 -1,438.44 - 0.71 54.55 -274.35 -283.05 -593.12 -421.87 -15.24 3.33 90.61 1,480.00 88.58 7.44 0.32 0.91 - 79.91 26.66 47.36 5.89 41.27 43.98 65.85 -
Primary energy consumption Netherlands total 2010 3,492.64 318.17 310.71 7.46 3.28 - - 4.18 1,304.63 2,621.28 2,213.79 399.84 7.65 -1,316.65 - 45.55 153.83 -305.13 -251.66 -591.49 -364.21 -32.44 1.70 27.20 1,642.67 127.35 14.38 0.37 1.21 0.32 111.07 34.21 63.97 12.89 38.41 51.15 10.00 -
Primary energy consumption Netherlands total 2011 3,245.45 313.04 305.51 7.54 4.19 - - 3.35 1,241.10 2,532.04 2,148.87 370.21 12.97 -1,290.94 - 50.98 36.22 -216.14 -306.24 -562.15 -272.06 -20.30 -1.73 0.47 1,433.56 132.21 18.36 0.20 1.40 0.32 111.92 37.36 61.73 12.83 40.16 52.66 32.72 -
Primary energy consumption Netherlands total 2012 3,269.10 343.80 334.26 9.54 6.34 - - 3.20 1,258.14 2,503.04 2,149.96 355.38 -2.31 -1,244.90 - 27.59 228.36 -339.55 -287.70 -553.68 -310.14 -20.63 -4.80 15.66 1,372.75 139.89 17.93 0.38 1.98 0.50 119.10 39.79 66.37 12.93 38.52 54.40 61.60 -
Primary energy consumption Netherlands total 2013 3,255.76 342.02 339.85 2.17 1.16 - - 1.01 1,230.85 2,412.67 2,037.10 363.06 12.51 -1,181.81 - 117.26 146.21 -360.10 -281.08 -526.90 -276.63 -16.24 -10.06 25.73 1,396.20 137.43 20.26 0.41 2.95 0.99 112.82 40.69 58.71 13.42 27.60 56.01 65.65 -
Total final consumption Netherlands total 1995 2,531.00 91.73 18.99 72.75 45.85 10.73 9.77 6.39 890.04 0.01 - 0.01 890.03 129.62 88.15 119.77 179.86 8.32 232.47 30.56 7.83 16.68 76.78 1,006.07 15.12 0.20 - 14.92 - 12.38 2.55 3.89 318.04 206.11
Total final consumption Netherlands total 2000 2,607.00 77.28 22.35 54.93 35.19 6.11 8.76 4.86 957.39 0.39 - 0.39 957.00 121.95 95.04 131.31 177.44 7.31 284.22 12.81 7.60 12.05 107.27 938.34 15.68 0.46 - 15.23 - 12.47 2.76 3.96 375.20 239.15
Total final consumption Netherlands total 2005 2,815.71 88.65 28.84 59.81 35.68 7.61 10.76 5.77 1,149.98 1.27 - 1.27 1,148.71 150.72 87.07 211.82 180.32 5.82 317.56 8.47 9.14 15.69 162.10 891.30 16.28 0.79 - 15.49 - 13.14 2.35 10.59 410.02 248.88
Total final consumption Netherlands total 2010 2,981.46 77.88 19.00 58.88 35.24 7.27 9.52 6.85 1,252.73 109.39 101.34 8.05 1,143.35 165.54 76.50 301.21 184.15 6.36 326.81 9.27 6.57 9.26 57.67 955.47 16.60 1.00 0.32 15.28 - 13.48 1.80 17.71 418.92 242.16
Total final consumption Netherlands total 2011 2,775.84 84.28 24.51 59.77 36.96 7.27 9.62 5.93 1,192.19 113.83 103.88 9.95 1,078.35 162.00 85.17 242.88 187.69 5.10 324.08 2.77 6.37 8.51 53.79 808.61 16.38 1.04 0.32 15.02 - 13.29 1.73 17.80 422.40 234.18
Total final consumption Netherlands total 2012 2,824.25 86.67 27.47 59.20 37.05 6.95 9.51 5.68 1,217.03 86.36 - 86.40 -0.05 1,130.67 170.70 57.80 330.53 180.87 6.27 320.09 3.24 4.35 8.36 48.46 844.66 16.29 1.07 0.50 14.73 - 13.44 1.29 19.55 414.54 225.51
Total final consumption Netherlands total 2013 2,812.34 75.41 22.35 53.07 33.58 7.07 9.22 3.20 1,187.37 104.77 - 91.83 12.93 1,082.60 149.13 139.44 232.14 174.23 6.32 319.22 2.69 4.26 8.79 46.38 879.86 17.23 1.09 0.99 15.15 - 13.83 1.32 19.57 412.47 220.43
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table shows the supply, transformation and the consumption of energy in a balance sheet. Energy is released - among other things - during the combustion of for example natural gas, petroleum, hard coal and biofuels. Energy can also be obtained from electricity or heat, or extracted from natural resources, e.g. wind or solar energy. In energy statistics all these sources of energy are known as energy commodities.

The supply side of the balance sheet includes indigenous production of energy, imports and exports and stock changes. For energy transformation, the table gives figures both on the transformation input (energy used to make other energy commodities) and the transformation output (energy made from other energy commodities) of energy commodities. The consumption side shows the consumption of energy for transformation in other energy commodities or as final consumption.

The energy balance describes the situation for the five main sectors, i.e. energy sector, industry (non energy), transport, private households and agriculture, fishing and services and many sub sectors. There is a difference between the energy balance sheet of the Netherlands and the energy balance sheet by sector. Imports and exports by sector are not known. The supply and deliveries by sector are known. The energy balance sheet shows net supply and deliveries. This equals net imports, exports and bunkers.

Figures refer to companies, institutions, private households and transport. Companies and institutions are broken down by branche based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC 2008). Sectors starting with a letter or number are SIC 2008 sectors.

Data available:
From 1995 up to and including 2013

Status of the figures:
All figures up to 2013 are definite.

Changes as of 28 July 2015:
None, this table has been discontinued, because the figures have been revised for all years.
The successor of this table is 'Energy balance sheet; supply, transformation and consumption'. See section 3.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable.

Note:
With the publication of revised provisional annual figures the underlying monthly balance sheets retain their provisional character. Monthly balance sheets of energy commodities natural gas, hard coal, electricity, petroleum products, crude and motor fuels have been published in separate StatLine tables (see 3. Links to relevant tables and symbols). Upon publication of the definite annual energy balance sheet the monthly balance sheets will be definite.

Description topics

Energy commodities petajoule
An energy commodity is energy, and may take the form of a fuel, heat or power. A petajoule (PJ) equals 1,000,000,000,000,000 joules (10 to the power of 15). A joule is a unit of energy equivalent to 0.24 calories. A PJ is equivalent to 31.6 million cubic meters of natural gas or 278 million kilowatt-hours of electricity.
Total energy commodities
This category is made up of the categories:
- Coal and coal products
- Crude and petroleum products
- Natural gas
- Renewable energy
- Nuclear energy
- Waste and other energy commodities
- Electricity
- Heat
Coal and coal products
Solid, fossil fuel existing of carbonized rests of vegetal origin. The carbonization is a result of prolonged exposure to high temperature and pressure.

Several products are derived of coal like coke-oven cokes and blast furnace gas.
Total coal and coal products
This category is made up of the categories:
- Primary coals
- Coal products
Primary coals
Hard coal:
Fossil fuel existing of carbonised rests of vegetal origin.

Sorts of hard coal: anthracite, coke oven cokes and steam coal. All these types have a calorific value of more than 24 megajoules per kilogram of the ash-free and wet product.

Lignite:
Sort of coal with a calorific value of less than 20 megajoules per kilogram of the ash-free and wet product and greater than 31 percent volatile matter on a dry mineral free basis.
Coal products
From coal derived products like coke-oven cokes and blast furnace gas.
Total coal products
This category is made up of the categories:
- Coke-oven cokes
- Coke oven gas
- Blast furnace gas
- Coal tar
Coke-oven cokes
Solid coal product derived from further carbonization at high temperature. In blast furnaces the product is used to produce iron from iron ore.
Coke oven gas
Gas derived as by-product from the carbonization of coal into coke-oven cokes.
Blast furnace gas
Gas derived as by-product from the production of iron in blast furnaces.
Coal tar
A tough black liquid mass. It is used in the preservation of iron, underwater treatment, underground constructions in concrete or steel, the outsides of ships, wooden sheds, barges and boats.
Crude and petroleum products
Liquid fossil fuel containing of chains of hydrocarbons. Crude oil is extracted from nature. In refineries, crude oil is transformed into various petroleum products.
Total crude and petroleum products
This category is made up of the categories:
- Crude
- Petroleum products
Crude
Goods used as feedstocks in refineries; mainly crude oil and natural gas liquids. Includes additives, e.g. biofuels for road transport, which are added to modify fuel properties and/or to reduce CO2 emissions.
Total crude
This category is made up of the categories:
- Crude oil
- Natural gas liquids
- Other hydrocarbons
Crude oil
A mineral oil of natural origin consisting of hydrocarbons and various impurities like sulphur. Under normal pressure and temperature crude oil is liquid. Physical properties such as density and viscosity are very variable.
Natural gas liquids
Light hydrocarbons derived as by-products from the extraction of natural gas or crude oil. These include ethane, propane, butane and pentane. Under normal pressure and temperature natural gas liquids are gaseous, however for transport the hydrocarbons are liquefied.
Other hydrocarbons
Hydrocarbons not otherwise specified. Examples include synthetic crude oil from tar sands and petroleum from the transformation of coal or natural gas.
Petroleum products
Products made of crude oil or other hydrocarbons available for consumption. The most familiar products are the fuels lpg, motor gasoline and gas/dieseloil. Also includes products not used as an energy commodity, but used as feedstock or admixture. E.g. are white spirit, lubricants and bitumen (asphalt).
Total petroleum products
This category is made up of the categories:
- Residual gases
- LPG
- Naphtha
- Motor gasoline
- Kerosene
- Gas/diesel oil
- Fuel oil
- Lubricants
- Bitumen
- Other petroleum products
Residual gases
Gas derived as by-product from the processing of crude oil in refineries and manufacture of chemicals. It consists mainly of hydrogen, methane, ethane and carbon monoxide.
Lpg
Liquefied Petroleum Gas. Light, straight hydrocarbons derived from refining of crude oil. These are mainly propane and butane or blends of these and ethane. At room temperature and normal pressure, LPG is gaseous. It is liquefied for storage and transport. Includes the motor fuel automotive lpg.
Naphtha
Light oil mainly used as feedstock in manufacture of chemicals and refineries. Naphtha has a distillation range between 30 and 210 degrees Celsius.

The petroleum products other light oil and aromatics have been included in the petroleum product naphtha.
Motor gasoline
Fuel for gasoline engines. This category is made up of motor gasoline, aviation gasoline and gasoline type jetfuel.
Kerosene
A medium heavy oil with a distillation range between 150 and 300 degrees Celsius. This category is made up of kerosene type jet fuel and other kerosene.
Gas/diesel oil
Heavy oil used as fuel in diesel engines and heating installations. The distillation range lies between 180 and 380 degrees Celsius. Gasoil is the most common name for this product, however the term diesel oil is often used due to the use in diesel engines. This product includes heating gasoil of which the distillation range goes up to 540 degrees Celsius.
Heavy fuel oil
Heavy oil which remains after the distillation in the refinery. This oil is for use mainly in cross-border shipping (bunkers), but also as fuel in industry and production of electricity and heat.
Lubricants
Oils or greases used for lubrication for sliding two surfaces for example in an engine.
Bitumen
A hard, almost solid or viscous hydrocarbon that remains as residue from the oil refining process. It is known mainly as asphalt and used in the sector construction of roads and roof covering.
Other petroleum products
Petroleum products not specified elsewhere.
Natural gas
Gaseous fuel of natural origin mainly consisting of methane. This results from the same process that leads to the formation of crude oil. Natural gas is liquefied for transport over long distances by ship.
Renewable energy
Renewable energy is energy from wind, hydro power, the sun, the earth, heat from outdoor air and biomass. Renewable energy is energy which comes from natural processes which are constantly replenished. Therefore, fossil and nuclear energy are not covered by renewable energy.

This definition of renewable energy followes the Energy Statistics Manual of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and Eurostat. Also definitions according to other methods are followed: the gross final consumption method from the EU Directive on Renewable Energy and the subsitution method from the national Protocol Monitoring Renewable Energy. As a result of the method followed 'shallow geothermal energy', 'aerothermal heat' and 'heat from just milked milk' are covered or not by renewable energy.
Total renewable energy
This category is made up of the categories:
- Wind energy
- Hydro power
- Solar energy
- Geothermal, deep
- Biomass
Wind energy
Energy produced with wind turbines. Wind turbines can be placed on shore and inland waters and off shore. Wind turbines on inland waters are counted in wind energy on shore.
Hydro power
Energy produced by flowing or falling water.
Solar energy
Solar radiation used for the production of hot water and electricity by solar panels and solar cells. Passive solar energy for heating buildings and greenhouses is not included.
Geothermal, deep
Deep geothermal is geothermal energy from below 500 m.

Geothermal energy below this depth originates from processes within the earth.
Biomass
Vegetal and animal materials from recent origin that are used for energy purposes. Examples are wood, manure and waste from the food industry.
Total biomass
This category is made up of the categories:
- Biogenic municipal waste
- Solid and liquid biomass
- Bio gas
Biogenic municipal waste
Household waste of vegetable or animal origin. Includes the biogenic fraction of mixed waste streams.
Solid and liquid biomass
Solid and liquid plant materials used for production of energy. Includes wood, wood and vegetable waste, biogasoline, biodiesel and other liquid biomass used in power plants.
Biogas
Gas produced by fermentation of organic material. Most important forms of organic material are from sewage purification (sewage gas), landfills, organic household waste, manure, maize and vegetal waste from agriculture, the food industry and trade.
Nuclear energy
Energy released by nuclear fusion. The energy is used to heat water, which is transformed into high pressure steam. This is used to generate electricity through a steam turbine.
Waste and other energy commodities
Energy not from fossil, renewable or nuclear energy commodities. Included are:
- The non-biogenic fraction of municipal and industrial waste used for the production of energy;
- Electricity generated by the expansion of gas in gas expansion turbines;
- Heat released in chemical reactions;
- Geothermal energy from above 500 m below the surface (geothermal energy above this depth originates mainly from seasonal exchange with the atmosphere; is also known as heat/cold storage);
- Aerothermal heat (used for heating houses and commercial buildings by means of a heat pump);
- Heat from just milked milk.
Electricity
Flow of electrons used to light lamps or to operate washing machines. Electrons are elementary particles in an atom with a negative charge that flow by a potential difference.
Heat
Energy in the form of steam and/or warm water. Steam is water with a temperature of more than 100 degrees Celsius. Warm water has a temperature of less than 100 degrees Celsius.