Macroeconomics

Macroeconomics

In Q4 2017, CO2 emissions in the Netherlands were 2.2 percent down year-on-year.

According to the first estimate conducted by Statistics Netherlands (CBS), GDP showed 0.8 percent growth in Q4 2017.

The total volume of goods exports grew by 6.6 percent in December 2017

According to the CBS Business Cycle Tracer, the economic situation has hardly changed in January.

Investments were up by almost 9 percent in November 2017 compared to November 2016.

Dutch household consumption was 2.6 percent up in November 2017.

The total volume of goods exports grew by 9.4 percent in November 2017

According to the CBS Business Cycle Tracer, the economic situation has hardly changed in January.

According to the second estimate conducted by Statistics Netherlands (CBS), GDP showed 0.4 percent growth in Q3 2017.

According to the CBS Business Cycle Tracer, the economic situation has improved slightly in December.

Dutch household consumption was 1.7 percent up in October 2017.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 8.3 percent up in October 2017.

The total volume of goods exports grew by 5.2 percent in October 2017

How to stratify dynamic populations of articles for price index computations.

Developments in the area of Green Growth

Dutch household consumption was 3.1 percent up in September 2017.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 4.7 percent up in September 2017.

According to the CBS Business Cycle Tracer, the economic situation has improved further in November.

In Q3 2017, CO2 emissions in the Netherlands were 0.2 percent up year-on-year.

Gross domestic product (GDP) posted a growth rate of 0.4 percent in Q3 2017 relative to Q2

Total volume of goods exports grew by almost 7 percent in September 2017.

Dutch household consumption was 2.3 percent up in August 2017.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 8.4 percent up in August 2017.

According to the CBS Business Cycle Tracer, the economic situation has improved in October.

Total volume of goods exports grew by over 7 percent in August 2017.

With 3.0 percent, GDP rose fastest on Bonaire.

Development of household and non-financial corproration debt (Q2 2017).

GDP showed a 1.5 percent growth in Q2 2017 relative to Q1 2017.

The economic situation is more or less the same in September compared to one month previously.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 9.3 percent up in July 2017.

Dutch consumer spending was 2.8 percent up in July 2017 from July 2016.

An assessment of the contribution of the Dutch public export credit insurance facility to Dutch GDP and employment

The total volume of goods exports grew by nearly 7 percent in July 2017.

Dutch consumer spending was more than 2 percent up in June 2017 from June 2016.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 0.3 percent down in June 2017.

The volume of goods exports grew by 11 percent in June 2017 relative to June 2016.

CO2 emissions in the Netherlands declined by 0.9 percent year-on-year.

The economic situation improved in August.

Gross domestic product (GDP) posted a growth rate of 1.5 percent in Q2 2017 relative to Q1

There were 34 fewer bankruptcies in July than in June 2017.

The average daily output generated by the Dutch manufacturing industry was 3.3 percent up in June 2017.

The Dutch consumer price index (CPI) was 1.3 percent higher in July 2017 than in July 2016.

Dutch consumer confidence stands at 25 in July, up from 23 in June.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was almost 17 percent up in May 2017.

Dutch consumer spending was more than 2 percent up in May 2017 from May 2016.

The economic situation has hardly changed in July.

The total volume of goods exports grew by 3.3 percent in May 2017 relative to May 2016.

Economic developments in Eindhoven over 2016.

The average daily output generated by the Dutch manufacturing industry was 3.9 percent up in May 2017.

For the first time in six years, government debt falls below 60 percent of GDP (EMU target).

The Dutch economic situation has hardly changes in June compared to May.

The gross domestic product (GDP) showed a 0.4 percent growth in Q1 2017.

Dutch consumer spending was 2.7 percent up in April 2017 from April 2016.

The Dutch consumer confidence indicator stands at 23, the same as in May.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 1.4 percent down in April 2017.

The total volume of goods exports grew by 2.9 percent in April 2017 relative to April 2016.

Seasonally adjusted series of Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

The Sustainability Monitor 2017 was presented to the Dutch House of Representatives on 17 May.

Almost 40 percent of fauna and flora species in the Netherlands are threatened with extinction.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 12.3 percent up in March 2017.

According to the CBS Business Cycle Tracer, the economic situation is improving further in May.

In Q1 2017, CO2 emissions in the Netherlands were higher than in Q1 2016.

GDP in Q1 2017 rose by 0.4% relative to the previous quarter.

The total volume of goods exports grew by 6.5 percent in March 2017 relative to March 2016.

Dutch consumer spending was 0.8 percent up in February 2017 from February 2016

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 3.4 percent up in February 2017.

Description of methodological changes made to improve and expand the EGSS-account.

The economic situation is improving further in April.

February's growth of exports is the most substantial in 6 years.

The average daily output generated by the Dutch manufacturing industry was 5 percent up in February 2017.

The Netherlands has a budget surplus of nearly 3 bn euros for the first time since the global financial crisis.

Economic situation improves further.

GDP grows 0.6 percent in Q4 2016.

The ecosystem unit map delineates ecosystem units in the Netherlands

Consumer spending up by 2.7 percent in January.

Investments up in January.

Highest point consumer confidence in almost 10 years

The volume of goods exported in January 2017 was 5.7 percent up from January 2016.

The average daily output generated by the Dutch manufacturing industry was 1.5 percent up in January 2017.

Turnover generated by temp employment agencies grew by 3.5 percent in Q4 relative to the preceding quarter.

Prices of products manufactured in the Netherlands were 9.5 percent up in January.

Consumer spending was 2.5 percent up in December. Consumers spent more on household appliances, furnishing and cars.

Investments down in December

The Dutch Cabinet has commissioned CBS to compile an annual Monitor of well-being.

Dutch good exports show further growth in December.

GDP growth 0.5 percent in Q4 2016.

In Q4 2016, CO2 emissions in the Netherlands rose by 7.3 percent year-on-year.

The economic situation improved further in February; all indicators perform above the level of their long-term trend.

Feasibility study on linking ownership information to Exiobase

The average daily output generated by the Dutch manufacturing industry was 4.7 percent up.

Dutch producer confidence increased from 4.7 in December to 6.0 in January.

The mood among Dutch consumers is somewhat more positive in January 2017. It is at the highest level in 9.5 years.

Dutch consumer spending was 2.8 percent up in November 2016 from November 2015; the largest increase in 6 years.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets grew by 0.8 percent in November 2016.

The economic situation has improved somewhat again in January compared to the preceding months

The total volume of exported goods grew by 5.5 percent in November 2016 relative to November 2015.

Growth GDP 0.8 percent in Q3 2016

Economic situation improving

Growth rate investments slows down

Consumers spending slightly up

The consumer confidence indicator stands at 12, as in the 2 previous months. The highest level in more than 9 years.

Dutch greenhouse gas emissions fell by 13 percent

The total volume of goods exports grew by 5.2 percent in October 2016 relative to October 2015.

The average daily output generated by the Dutch manufacturing industry was 0.6 percent up in October 2016 from October.

Both turnover and hours worked in temp jobs increased in the third quarter of 2016.

Prices of products manufactured in the Netherlands were 1.5 percent up in October 2016 on a year-on-year basis.

The use of raw materials in the Dutch economy was reduced by 14 percent in the period 2004-2014.

Steady growth consumer spending

Business confidence remains high into the fourth quarter of 2016.

The Dutch consumer confidence indicator stands at 12, just as it did in October.

Further growth investments

GDP in the euro area rose by 0.3 percent in the third quarter of 2016.

It is the third consecutive quarter in which CO2 emission levels fall while the economy is growing

Economy improves further

The total volume of goods exports grew by 4.6 percent in September 2016 relative to September 2015

On 25 September 2015 the United Nations formulated 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

What is the impact of the environmental sector on the economy?

Dutch consumer spending was 1.0 percent up in August 2016 from August 2015. Spending on services rose considerably.

The consumer confidence indicator rose 4 points to + 12 in October. This is the highest level since August 2007.

Further growth investments

Economic situation is improving

The total volume of Dutch goods exports grew by 3.7 percent in August 2016 relative to August 2015

The Dutch producer confidence indicator stood at 3.4 in September, up from 1.2 in August.

Disposable household income rose by 2.1 percent, mainly due to higher compensation of employees.

Economic growth 0.6 percent in Q2

Economic situation is improving

Prices of owner-occupied houses were on average 6.0 percent higher in August 2016 than in August 2015.

Dutch consumer spending up again

Steady growth investments

Today, CBS publishes its ‘revised’ Business Cycle Tracer

Further growth exports

The total number of hours worked in temp jobs increased by 2.9 percent in the second quarter of 2016.

Output prices of products manufactured in the Netherlands were 5.8 percent down in July 2016 from July 2015.

On two of the three islands of the Caribbean Netherlands, the value of the gross domestic product increased in 2014.

Prices of owner-occupied houses were on average 4.9 percent higher in July 2016 than in July 2015.

Further growth investments

The Dutch consumer confidence indicator increased by 1 point to +2 in August 2016.

Dutch consumer spending up

Business confidence in Q3 2016

Economic growth (GDP) in the euro area, EU and other countries in Q2 2016

Economy continues to grow

In the second quarter of 2016, CO2 emissions in the Netherlands were 0.3 percent lower.

Modest growth exports

The Dutch economic situation is more or less the same in August as in the preceding months.

The polluter-pay principle does not always apply.

The number of bankruptcies decreased by 16 in July 2016 relative to June.

The average daily output generated by Dutch manufacturing industry was 1.6 percent up in June.

Economic situation stable over the past months

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets grew by 4.4 percent in May 2016 relative to the same month last year.

Dutch consumer spending on goods and services was 1.4 percent up in May 2016 from May 2015.

The Dutch consumer confidence indicator declined by 4 point to +1 in July

Exports growth 6.2 percent in May

Disposable household incomes rose by 0.3 percent year-on-year, mainly due to higher wages.

Economic growth 0.5 percent in Q1 2016

Economic situation fairly stable

When does Statistics Netherlands publish new national accounts figures?

Higher investments, mainly in residential property

Dutch consumer spending on goods and services was equal in April compared to April 2015.

The mood among Dutch consumers improved in June.

Robust growth exports

Agro-sector exports were valued at over 45 billion euros in 2014, earning almost 29 bn euros in revenues.

In 2015 the value of agricultural exports amounted to 81.3 bn euros, the highest value ever.

The agricultural surplus ion the trade balance 26.1 bn euros versus 47.5 bn euros for all goods.

The total number of hours worked in temp jobs decreased by 1.5 percent in the first quarter of 2016

Output prices of products manufactured in the Netherlands were down by 8.1 percent in April 2016.

Growth investments slows down

Steady economic growth

CO2 emissions in the Netherlands were reduced by 1.3 percent in Q1 2016.

The total volume of goods exports grew by 2.8 percent in March 2016 compared to March 2015.

Economic situation improves somewhat

Output prices of products manufactured in the Netherlands were 7.4 percent down in March

Confidence among Dutch manufacturers improved further, reaching the highest level in 5 years.

Extending the Materials Monitor with Water

The mood among Dutch consumers has turned from negative to positive in April.

Dutch consumer spending on goods and services was 0.1 percent up in February 2016.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets grew by 16.7 percent in February 2016 relative to February 2015.

The Dutch retail sector boasted a 2.3 percent year-on-year turnover growth in February 2016.

The economic situation is somewhat less favourable in March 2016 than in the preceding month.

The average daily output generated by Dutch manufacturing industry.

The Dutch economy grew 0.3 percent in Q4 2015 relative to the previous quarter.

In the final quarter of 2015, emissions of CO2 in the Netherlands were 0.4 percent higher than in the same period one year previously. According to Statistics Netherlands, an important factor in rising CO2 emissions is increased production at electricity companies and in the chemical industry

Statistics Netherlands (CBS) reports today that - just as in the preceding months - the economic situation in the Netherlands continues to improve. Most indicators in February’s Business Cycle Tracer performed above the level of their long-term average.

Statistics Netherlands reports that Dutch quarter-on-quarter economic growth in Q4 2015 was 0.3 percent. Growth is fuelled by investments and exports.

According to CBS, the economies on the islands of the Caribbean Netherlands all realised growth in 2013.

Statistics Netherlands (CBS) reports today that - just as in the preceding months -  the economic situation in the Netherlands continues to improve. Most indicators in December’s Business Cycle Tracer performed above the level of their long-term average.

Adjusted for inflation, the average remuneration per employee has decreased after the outbreak of the credit crunch in 2008, although labour productivity increased. This means that the higher labour productivity level of employed persons has as yet not resulted in a higher remuneration level for employees (after adjustment for inflation).

According to the second estimate on economic growth conducted by Statistics Netherlands (CBS), economic growth in the Netherlands was 0.1 percent in the third quarter of 2015 relative to the second quarter. The growth rate remains unchanged. According to the first estimate, published on 13 November, the growth rate was also 0.1 percent. The picture of the economy also remains unchanged. Exports, investments and consumption all made a positive contribution to economic growth. First estimate

The Dutch economy has become greener over the past 15 years. Five out six themes structured around greening of the economy show a positive trend. The environmental efficiency of the Dutch economy is improving, for example. Compared to other European countries, however, the Netherlands scores relatively low on this theme.

Statistics Netherlands (CBS) reports today that similar to previous months, the economic situation in the Netherlands has improved further on nearly all accounts .  In November 2015, most indicators of the Business Cycle Tracer performed above the level of their long-term average. The economic situation looks marginally better than last month.

CO2 emissions in the Netherlands grow faster than the country’s economy. In the third quarter of 2015, CO2 emissions were 6.8 percent up from one year previously.

Statistics Netherlands (CBS) reports that the Dutch economy grew by 0.1 percent in the third quarter of this year relative to the second quarter. The growth rate is based on a first estimate with data currently available. Exports, investments and consumption made a positive contribution.

Statistics Netherlands (CBS) reports today that the economic situation in the Netherlands remains invariably positive. Nearly all indicators in the Business Cycle Tracer performed above the level of their long-term average. Relative to the previous month, the economic situation has hardly changed in October 2015.

Statistics Netherlands (CBS) announced that the volume of investments in tangible fixed assets grew by 13.2 percent in August 2015 relative to August 2014. The increase is mainly due to considerably higher investments in residential property and infrastructural projects.

According to the second estimate of economic growth conducted by Statistics Netherlands (CBS), the Dutch economy grew 0.2 percent in Q2 2015 relative to Q1 2015.

In 2014 public expenditure on defence declined by 191 million euros to 7.4 billion euros. Dutch defence expenditure has shown a downward trend for the past five years, in spite of a slight increase in expenditure in 2013. Defence expenditure has shown a decline of 1.1 billion euros since 2009.

Dutch state pension (AOW) entitlement nearly doubled between 2008 and 2014 and by far exceed entitlement to the supplementary employee pension schemes.

The economies of the eurozone expanded by 0.3 percent in the second quarter of 2015 compared to the first quarter, according to the most recent first calculations by Eurostat.

The Dutch economy grew by 0.1 percent in Q2 2015 relative to Q1. Exports, investments and household consumption contributed in a positive manner, but the growth figure was pushed down when the extraction of natural gas was substantially reduced.

Worldwide, the Netherlands has the seventh largest trade surplus in the trade of goods . China and Germany have the largest trade surpluses in the world in the absolute sense. The United States have by far the largest trade deficit in the goods trade. Three EU countries with large trade deficits in dollars are France, Spain and Greece.

Statistics Netherlands reported today that the overall Dutch household debt exceeded 742 billion euros at the end of March 2015, i.e. 2 billion euros up from one quarter previously. In the period between the end of September 2012 and mid-2014, household debts were still declining. The recent increase is partly due to the revival of the housing market and the lower level of gift tax exemption. Interest rates have also been at a historically low level for quite a while.

Dutch public debt amounted to 459 bn euros after the first quarter of this year, i.e. 68.9 percent of GDP. Half of public debt is in the hands of foreign creditors.

ICT has had a positive effect on the Dutch economy between 2000 and December 2010. Firms became more productive in sectors where ICT is used intensively.

Incoming tourism accounted for a direct contribution to Bonaire’s gross domestic product (GDP) of approximately 16.4 percent in 2012.

Preliminary results show that the level of the Dutch Gross National Income in 2011 and 2012 were higher than previously calculated: 1.8 and 1.5 percent respectively. Newly released information about the sizable international financial flows of multinationals has contributed tothis raised estimate.

The European Union has formulated the so called Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure. By means of a scoreboard, the European Commission judges whether there are (potential) imbalances within the member state’s economies. The scoreboard consists of eleven indicators, with lower and upper limits set by the Commission for each indicator. This factsheet explains at the scoreboard in more detail.

The real disposable household income rose by 0.4 percent in 2014. After correction for inflation, household incomes improved for the first time since 2011. Today, the average household income is approximately 2.5 percent below the pre-recession level in 2008. Household consumption increased marginally in 2014, but is still 4.5 percent below the level recorded in 2008.

The public deficit over 2014 was 2.3 percent of GDP. Central government and the social funds were the largest contributors to the deficit. The municipal deficit has fallen sharply, but the provincial deficit has risen substantially.

Dutch retail sales grew again in 2014, for the first time since 2008. After two years of decreasing turnover, retail turnover rose by 0.5 percent. The fourth quarter in particular contributed to this, with an increase in turnover of nearly 3 percent.

According to Eurostat calculations published last Friday, the economies of the eurozone and the European Union as a whole increased by 0.3 and 0.4 percent respectively in the fourth quarter of 2014 from the third quarter. Also on Friday, Statistics Netherlands announced a 0.5 percent growth of the Dutch economy in the same period. Year-on-year growth for the fourth quarter was 1.0 percent in the Netherlands. The economies of the eurozone and the European Union grew by 0.9 and 1.3 percent year-on-year.

On the basis of additional information, the second estimate shows that the Dutch economy grew 0.1 percent in the third quarter of 2014 relative to the second quarter.

The volume of investment in tangible fixed assets was 5.0 percent higher in October 2014 than in October 2013. Investment in dwellings, infrastructure and in machinery and installations were the main contributors to October’s growth.

The European Union has formulated the so called Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure. By means of a scoreboard, the European Commission judges whether there are (potential) imbalances within the member state’s economies. The scoreboard consists of eleven indicators, with lower and upper limits set by the Commission for each indicator. This factsheet explains at the scoreboard in more detail.

Most confectionery imported into the Netherlands in 2013 came from Belgium and Germany. Only 3 percent came from Spain, from where St Nicholas traditionally travels to the Netherlands with gifts of chocolate and marzipan for children to celebrate his name day on 5 December.

According to figures released by Eurostat on Friday, the economies in the eurozone and the EU grew by 0.2 and 0.3 percent respectively in the third quarter compared with the previous quarter. Year-on-year growth was 0.8 percent for the eurozone and 1.3 percent for the EU. Also on Friday, Statistics Netherlands announced a quarter-on-quarter Dutch growth of 0.2 percent and year-on-year growth of 1.1 percent. The Dutch economy has been developing along the same lines as that in the eurozone in the last few years.

According to flash estimate of economic growth the Dutch economy grew by 0.2 percent from the second quarter to the third quarter of 2014.

The CO2 emissions by the Dutch economy were up by 0.4 percent in the third quarter of 2014 on the same quarter of 2013. When corrected for differences in the weather CO2 emissions were 1.0 percent higher. The year-on-year growth of the Dutch economy in the third quarter of 2014 was 1.1 percent. These are the latest figures released by Statistics Netherlands today. Dutch CO2 emissions are calculated according to the definitions of the Environmental Accounts.

According to Statistics Netherlands, the volume of exports of goods was 6.4 percent up in September 2014 from September 2013. In the preceding month, exports grew by more than 1 percent. Higher exports of Dutch products and higher re-exports contributed to the growth.

The volume of exports of goods was 1.2 percent up in August 2014 from August 2013, after a 4.1 percent improvement in July. According to Statistics Netherlands, the increase was caused by higher re-exports.

Household spending on goods and services was 1.5 percent up in August 2014 from August 2013. This is the largest increase for almost four years, according to Statistics Netherlands.

The volume of investment in tangible fixed assets was 3.8 percent lower in August 2014 than in August 2013. According to Statistics Netherlands, investment in residential and non-residential property and investment in means of transport were the main contributors to August’s deterioration.

Measuring the economy is one of the core tasks of Statistics Netherlands. This is done according to an agreed set of international guidelines and methods, assuring that the figures of the various countries are comparable.

The volume of exports of goods was 4.7 percent up in July 2014 from July 2013, after a 3.6 percent improvement in June. According to Statistics Netherlands, the growth in exports was mainly caused by higher re-exports.

The second estimate of economic growth - published by Statistics Netherlands today - shows that Dutch economic growth was 0.7 percent higher in the second quarter than in the first quarter. The flash estimate released on 14 August stated an economic growth rate of 0.5 percent. The upward adjustment of 0.2 of a percentage point can be accounted for by small upward adjustments in household consumption and fixed capital formation.

The contribution of the tourism sector to Dutch GDP rose from 3.2 percent in 2010 to 3.6 percent in 2013 according to the latest figures released by Statistics Netherlands today. The tourism sector is mainly growing because more foreign tourists visit the Netherlands.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets in July 2014 was up 5.2 percent on July 2013. this followed two months in which investments were slightly lower than twelve months previously.

Household spending on goods and services was 0.5 percent up in July 2014 from July 2013. In May and June household spending was approximately at the same level as one year previously.

The volume of exports of goods was 4.1 percent up in July 2014 from July 2013, after a 3.2 percent improvement in June. According to Statistics Netherlands, the growth in exports was mainly caused by higher re-exports.

More than one in ten people in the Netherlands think the risk of having their homes broken into is (very) high. The share has risen in recent years, in particular among people living in rural areas and over-65s. Yet, these groups are the least afraid burglary. The increase is remarkable, because the amount of victims of (attempted) burglary has barely risen.

Statistics Netherlands announced today that the Dutch labour market showed signs of recovery in the second quarter of 2014.

Statistics Netherlands announced today that investments have seriously fallen behind in the Netherlands in the past years. Another factor that plays a part in this respect is that Dutch companies invest much more abroad through foreign subsidiary companies than they used to do. This trend was already manifest in the pre-recession period.

Today Statistics Netherlands publishes De Nederlandseeconomie2013.

After 2000, the share of the corporate sector in the national income has increased, but the share of households has decreased as research conducted by Statistics Netherlands shows. This is partly the result of tax measures: taxes increased for households, but decreased for the corporate sector.

The volume of exports of goods was 1.9 percent up in June 2014 from June 2013, after a 3.0 percent drop in May. The volume of imported goods was 1.9 percent down from twelve months previously. The volume of imports had fallen in May, but to a lesser extent (0.9 percent).

Household spending on goods and services was approximately the same in June 2014 as in June 2013. In April and May, household spending was also at the same level as one year previously.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 4.3 percent down in June 2014 from June 2013. According to Statistics Netherlands, investments in residential and non-residential property and infrastructural projects declined considerably, but investments in cars and computers were still growing in June.

CO2 emissions by the Dutch economy were 0.9 percent lower in the second quarter of  2014 than in the same quarter of 2013. Adjusted for the differences in the weather, CO2 emissions increased by 3.7 percent however. The flash estimate by Statistics Netherlands shows that the Dutch economy grew by 0.9 percent year-on-year in the second quarter of 2014. The CO2 emissions are calculated according to the definitions of the Environmental accounts.

According to the so-called flash estimate of economic growth, which is based on an incomplete set of currently available data, the Dutch economy grew 0.5 percent in the second quarter of 2014 relative to the first quarter.

The volume of exports of goods was 2.4 percent up in June 2014 from June 2013, after a 3.1 percent drop in May. The volume of imported goods was 2.3 percent down from twelve months previously. The volume of imports had fallen in May, but to a lesser extent (0.7 percent).

The volume of exports of goods was 3.1 percent down in May 2014 from May 2013. This is the largest decrease in the last four and a half years. In the months prior to the decrease in May, exports had grown modestly.

The volume of investments in tangible fixed assets was 0.5 percent up in May 2014 from May 2013. The growth of private and public sector investments continues, but has slowed down compared to the preceding months.

According to Statistics Netherlands, Dutch households spent 0.1 percent more on goods and services in May 2014 than in May 2013. For the first time this year, consumer spending is up from one year previously, but only just.

The European Union has formulated the so called Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure. By means of a scoreboard, the European Commission judges whether there are (potential) imbalances within the member state’s economies. The scoreboard consists of eleven indicators, with lower and upper limits set by the Commission for each indicator. This Factsheet explains at the scoreboard in more detail.

The volume of exports of goods was 2.8 percent down in May 2014 from May 2013. A decline of this magnitude has not occurred in the past four and a half years. In the months prior to the decline in May, exports had grown modestly.

The volume of exports of goods was 1.2 percent up in April 2014 from April 2013. In the first months of 2014, the foreign demand for natural gas was considerably lower than twelve months previously, due to the relatively mild weather conditions. This slowed down exports growth but in April, the effect of the weather conditions was less negative than in the preceding months.

In the first quarter of 2014 the net real disposable income > of households was 0.2 percent higher than in the first quarter of 2013. It is the first rise in two years. Household debt fell by 2.4 billion euros, of which 1.8 billion euros was in household mortgages.

The most recent calculations made by Statistics Netherlands indicate that last year’s public deficit and public debt are in fact lower than the first estimate dating back to March suggested. In the current calculation, the nationalisation of SNS REAAL is incorporated in the deficit in a different manner, new international guidelines are applied and the most recent data available are used.

From today, the Netherlands is one of the first countries in the European Union to comply with the new international guidelines for national accounts.

According to Statistics Netherlands, Dutch households spent 0.1 percent less on goods and services in April 2014 than in April 2013. Just as in the preceding three months of 2014, households used far less natural gas in April than twelve months previously.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 5.8 percent up in April 2014 from April 2013. According to Statistics Netherlands, investments continue to grow.

The volume of exports of goods was 2.0 percent up in April 2014 from April 2013. The growth was slightly more substantial than in the preceding months, when the relatively mild weather conditions slowed down exports growth.

The volume of exports of goods was 0.7 percent up in March 2014 from March 2013. In February, exports growth was 1.3 percent. Due to the relatively mild weather conditions in the first months of 2014, the foreign demand for natural gas was considerably lower. This slowed down exports growth.

CO2 emissions by the Dutch economy were 10.1 percent lower in the first quarter of 2014 than in the same quarter of 2013. Adjusted for the differences in the weather, CO2 emissions fell by just 0.4 percent. The first provisional estimate by Statistics Netherlands shows that the Dutch economy contracted by 0.5 percent year-on-year in the first quarter of 2014. The CO2 emissions are calculated according to the definitions of the Environmental accounts.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 4.3 percent up in March 2014 from March 2013. The growth was more substantial than in the preceding two months.

Dutch households spent 2.3 percent less on goods and services in March 2014 than in March 2013. Households used far less natural gas in the first months of 2014 than in the same period in 2013 due to the relatively mild weather conditions.

According to the first estimate conducted by the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), the Dutch economy recorded a negative growth rate of 1.4 percent in the first quarter of 2014 relative to the fourth quarter of 2013. In the preceding three quarters the economy had grown. The lower natural gas consumption as a result of the mild weather conditions in winter largely accounted for the negative growth rate. The economy improves further, but the situation on the labour market is still bleak: 32 thousand employee jobs were lost in the first quarter relative to the fourth quarter of 2013.

The volume of exports of goods was 1.3 percent up in March 2014 from March 2013. Exports growth was in the same order of magnitude as in February. Due to the relatively mild weather conditions in the first months of 2014, the foreign demand for natural gas was considerably lower. This slowed down exports growth.

The volume of exports of goods was 1.4 percent higher in February 2014 than in February 2013. In January, the volume of exports grew marginally (0.2 percent). The volume of imports of goods grew by 0.3 percent in February, just as in January.

The latest figures released today by Statistics Netherlands (CBS) show that nearly all Dutch provinces were affected by the economic recession in 2013.

Dutch households spent 1.2 percent less on goods and services in February 2014 than in February 2013. In January, domestic consumption was down by 1.7 percent. Due to the relatively mild weather conditions, households used fare less natural gas to heat their homes in the first months of 2014 than in the same period in 2013.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 9.2 percent up in February 2014 from February 2013. The growth was more substantial than in January when investments were 7.6 percent up from the same month in 2013.

The European Union has formulated the so called Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure. By means of a scoreboard, the European Commission judges whether there are (potential) imbalances within the member state’s economies. The scoreboard consists of eleven indicators, with lower and upper limits set by the Commission for each indicator. This Factsheet explains at the scoreboard in more detail.

The volume of exports of goods was 1.9 percent higher in February 2014 than in February 2013. In January, the volume of exports fell marginally (0.4 percent). The volume of imports of goods grew by 1.3 percent in February, after a modest 0.3 percent growth in January.

Dutch companies quoted on the Amsterdam stock exchange (AEX) paid 700 million euros less in dividends last year than in 2012. The main reason for this decrease was that KPN did not pay any dividend. Optional dividends accounted for two-thirds of the total payments

Real disposable income of Dutch households fell by 1.1 percent in the fourth quarter of 2013. Although real disposable income has been decreasing since the third quarter of 2011, this quarter the decrease was smaller than in the previous seven quarters. These developments are measured by moving annual totals: the figures for four quarters are combined and assigned to the last quarter.

Real disposable income of Dutch households was 1.1 percent lower in 2013 than in 2012. The decrease was smaller than in 2012, when disposable income fell by 2.2 percent. The decrease in 2013 was mainly caused by wage increases that were smaller than the inflation rate, decreasing employment, and an increase in taxes and social insurance premiums. At 2.5 percent, inflation was well above the average collectively negotiated wage increases. The number of employee jobs fell by 136 thousand. Partly because of the decrease in income, real consumption expenditure fell by 2.1 percent in 2013.

According to the second estimate, the Dutch economy grew 0.9 percent in the fourth quarter of 2013 relative to the third quarter, versus 0.7 percent on the basis of the first estimate released on 14 February. The quarter-on-quarter growth rate of the fourth quarter was revised on the basis of year-on-year economic developments. The estimate for the fourth quarter was adjusted upwards, the estimate for the third quarter was adjusted downwards. The other quarters have not been revised relative to the same quarter in the previous year.

Figures released by Statistics Netherlands today show that Dutch government deficit amounted to 2.5 percent of GDP in 2013. This puts it below the European norm of 3 percent for the first time in five years. In 2012, the deficit still amounted to 4.1 percent. The government debt of the Netherlands rose by 2.2 percentage points in 2013, to 73.5 percent of GDP, well over the European limit of 60 percent.

The volume of exports of goods was 0.4 percent down in January 2014 from January 2013. In December last year, the volume of exports grew by a modest 0.5 percent. The volume of imports grew by 0.3 percent in January, after a 1.7 percent growth in December.

Dutch households spent 1.5 percent less on goods and services in January 2014 than twelve months previously. In November and December 2013, domestic consumption had grown marginally.

The volume of private sector investment in tangible fixed assets was 6.7 percent up in January 2014 from January 2013. This is mainly due to higher investment in machinery and residential and non-residential property.

Today, the first results of the revised version of the national accounts will be published by Statistics Netherlands. The direct cause for the revision is the adoption of new international methodological guidelines. Statistics Netherlands, like many other European member states, has conducts a source revision simultaneously.

In December 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 0.2 percent up from twelve months previously. In November last year, the volume of exports increased by 1.9 percent. The volume of imports grew by 1.3 percent in December, after a marginal growth by 0,3 percent in November.

Dutch households spent 0,7 percent more on goods and services in December 2013 than in December 2012. In November, domestic consumption had also increased (0,3 percent) relative to one year previously. The modest increase over the last months of 2013 was preceded by nearly two and a half years of decline.

he volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 19.3 percent up in December 2013 from December 2012. This is mainly due to higher investments in passenger cars, machinery and residential and non-residential property.

According to the first estimate conducted by Statistics Netherlands, the Dutch economy grew 0.7 percent in the fourth quarter relative to the third quarter.

In December 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 0.1 percent up from twelve months previously. In November last year, the volume of exports increased by 1.1 percent. The volume of imports grew by 0.8 percent in December, after a marginal decline in November.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 2.6 percent up in November 2013 from November 2012. For the second month in a row, private sector investments were higher than one year previously.

In November 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 2.4 percent up from twelve months previously, whereas the volume had decreased somewhat in September and October. The volume of imports grew by 0.8 percent, after a marginal decline in October.

The economic growth rate in the Netherlands over the third quarter of 2013 was 0.2 percent relative to the second quarter.

Real disposable household income in the Netherlands was 2.6 percent lower in the third quarter of 2013 than twelve months previously. This downward tendency has been visible for a number of quarters now, and the reason is that income has not been rising while inflation has.

The economy in the province of Drenthe deteriorated most during the recession period 2008-2012, the province of North Brabant performed best in the face of the recession. The sectors manufacturing industry and public administration in particular performed poorly in Drenthe.

Dutch households spent 1.1 percent less on goods and services in October 2013 than in October 2012. The decline is less substantial than in preceding months. This is mainly due to higher car sales.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 4.6 percent up in October 2013 from October 2012. For the first time since July 2012, private sector investments were higher than one year previously.

In October 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 0.6 percent up from twelve months previously. In September, the volume of exports had been marginally down. The volume of imports fell by 0.4 percent in October, after marginal growth in September.

The European Union has formulated the so called Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure. By means of a scoreboard, the European Commission judges whether there are (potential) imbalances within the member state’s economies. The scoreboard consists of eleven indicators, with lower and upper limits set by the Commission for each indicator. This Factsheet explains at the scoreboard in more detail.

In September 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 0.5 percent down from September 2012. In the preceding three months, exports growth was about 2 percent. The volume of imports grew by 1.2 percent in September. In August, this volume shrank by 1.6 percent.

Households spent 2.1 percent less on goods and services in September 2013 than in September 2012. Relative to the same month in the previous year, household spending has been in continuous decline for more than two years now.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 2.9 percent down in September 2013 from September 2012. The decline was less substantial than in August, when private sector investments were 4.6 percent down from one year previously.

the Dutch economy grew by 0.1 percent in the third quarter van 2013 compared to the second quarter. It is the first time after the second quarter of 2012 that there is any quarterly growth.

Statistics Netherlands’ Green growth in the Netherlands 2012 is published today. This report presents an overview of the state of green growth in the Netherlands in terms of 33 indicators.

In September 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 0.6 percent down from September 2012. In the preceding three months, exports growth was about 2 percent. The volume of imports grew by 1.6 percent in September. In August, this volume shrank by 2.1 percent.

In the publication<em> Green growth in the Netherlands 2012</em> Statistics Netherlands analyses and describes the state of the green economy in the Netherlands.

The volume of goods exports was 2.2 percent lager in August 2013 than in August 2012. This increase is in the same order of magnitude as in the preceding two months.

Household spending on goods and services was 2.0 percent down in August 2013 from August 2012. The decrease was the same as in July.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 7.0 percent down in August 2013 from August 2012. The decline was less substantial than in July, when private sector investments were 9.0 percent down from one year previously.

In August 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 2.5 percent up from August 2012. Exports growth was marginally higher than in the preceding three months. The volume of imports shrank by 2.3 percent in August, almost the same as in July.

The total debt of households and non-financial companies amounted to more than 1.3 trillion euros by the end of June, i.e. 223.7 percent of the GDP. This so-called private debt-to-GDP ratio was marginally below the level of the preceding quarter (224.0 percent).

Real disposable household income in the Netherlands was 2.6 percent lower in the second quarter of 2013 than twelve months previously. Disposable income has been falling for two years now.

In July 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 1.9 percent up from July 2012. Exports growth was marginally larger than in May and June. The volume of imports decreased by 2.4 percent in July. In June imports still rose by 1.2 percent.

The Dutch economy contracted 0.1 percent in the second quarter of 2013 relative to the first quarter. When the first estimate was published on 14 August, the contraction was 0.2 percent.

Household spending on goods and services was 2.2 percent down in July 2013 from July 2012. The contraction was somewhat smaller than in June (2.6 percent).

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 8.6 percent down in July 2013 from July 2012. The decline was less substantial than in June, when private sector investments were 14.2 percent down from one year previously.

In July 2013, the volume of exports of goods was 1.1 percent up from July 2012. The growth is in the same order of magnitude as in May and June.

The sustained downturn in household consumption in the Netherlands in recent years has frustrated economic growth. Households cut back on spending because their incomes do not allow them to spend more. The situation is different in Belgium and Germany where incomes and consumer spending are up.

The publication The Dutch economy 2012 is released today. The publication provides comprehensive and detailed information on the structure of the Dutch economy and economic developments in 2012. The first copy of The Dutch economy 2012 will be presented to the Dutch Minister of Finance Jeroen Dijsselbloem by Gosse van der Veen, Director General of Statistics Netherlands.

The volume of exports of goods was 0.9 percent up in June 2013 from June 2012. Exports growth was marginally smaller than in May (1.1 percent). In April, exports were still 2.0 percent down from one year previously.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 15.2 percent down in June 2013 from June 2012. The decline is more substantial than in April and May.

According to the first estimate conducted by Statistics Netherlands, the Dutch economy shrank 0.2 percent in the second quarter of 2013 compared to the first quarter. This is the fourth quarter in a row showing economic decline, although with each quarter the decline became less severe

The volume of exports of goods was up by 1.7 percent in June 2013 on June 2012. Exports growth was marginally larger than in May (1.4 percent). In April, exports were down 1.8 percent from one year previously. The volume of imports increased by 0.9 percent in June, after contracting in April and May.

The volume of exports of goods was 0.8 percent up in May from May 2012. In April, exports were 1.9 percent down from one year previously.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was 10.9 percent down in May 2013 from May 2012. The decline is slightly more substantial than in April, when private sector investments were 10.4 percent down from one year previously.

Dutch companies quoted on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange paid out more than 7.5 billion euros in the first six months of this year, i.e. 1 billion euros less than in the same period in 2012.

The volume of exports of goods was 0.7 percent up in May from May 2012. In April, exports were 2.2 percent down from one year previously. The volume of imports declined by 1.0 percent in May compared to twelve months previously.

Compared with May 2012, Dutch terms of trade of imported and exported goods slightly improved in May 2013.

The real disposable income of Dutch households was 2.6 percent lower in the first quarter of 2013 than in the same period last year. This is mainly the result of the high inflation rate: prices of consumer goods rose by an average 2.5 percent. Nominal disposable income, i.e. not corrected for inflation, remained at about the same level.

In the first quarter of 2013, the Dutch government has realised a surplus, predominantly due to the one-off revenue from the auction of telecom frequencies. The nationalisation of SNS REAAL does not affect the government balance sheet. The public deficit over the past four quarters has fallen to 2.9 percent of the GDP.

The total amount outstanding in life course savings schemes exceeded 5 billion euros is in 2012. Deposits are lower than last year, withdrawals used to finance a period of unpaid leave are higher than ever.

According to Statistics Netherlands’ second estimate, Dutch economic growth was -0.4 percent in the first quarter of 2013 compared with the previous quarter.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was down 9.9 percent in April 2013 from April 2012. The decline is less substantial than in March, when private sector investments were down 14.1 percent from one year previously.

The volume of exports of goods was 2.7 percent lower in April than twelve months previously. Exports decreased for the first time since October 2011. The volume of imports decreased by 0.2 percent in April; this is in the same order of magnitude as in March.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was nearly 14.1 percent down in March 2013 from March 2012. The decline is somewhat more substantial than in February, when private sector investments were 12.1 percent down from one year previously.

The volume of exports of goods grew by 1.9 percent in March relative to twelve months previously. The growth of exports has not been this low since August 2012. The volume of imports increased by 0.5 percent in March, the lowest growth rate in more than twelve months.

The Dutch economy contracted 0.1 percent in the first quarter of 2013 relative to the fourth quarter of 2012.

The Netherlands was the second most prosperous country in the European Union (EU) in 2011 after Luxembourg. Bulgaria and Romania are the least prosperous countries in the EU. Relative to 1995, the prosperity gap between the various EU countries has narrowed.

The volume of exports of goods grew by 3 percent in February relative to twelve months previously. Over the past five months, exports growth ranged between 3 and 6 percent. The volume of imports increased by 1 percent in February, the lowest growth rate in more than twelve months.

Last year, the economy shrank across nearly all provinces. The economy in the province of Friesland shrank most dramatically (1.5 percent), but the contraction was also above the national average of 1.0 percent in the provinces of Overijssel, Drenthe and North Brabant.

The volume of exports of goods grew by 3 percent in February relative to twelve months previously. Over the past five months, exports growth ranged between 3 and 6 percent. The volume of imports increased by 1.5 percent in February, the lowest growth rate in almost twelve months.

In the fourth quarter of last year, the real disposable income of Dutch households was 3.2 percent down from one year previously. The decline is unprecedented since Statistics Netherlands started registration. Household consumption also declined further in the fourth quarter and the overall mortgage debt was reduced.

The Dutch economy shrank by 0.4 percent in the fourth quarter of 2012 compared with the preceding quarter. The first estimate, published on 14 February put the contraction at 0.2 percent.

In 2012 the Dutch government deficit shrank to 4.1 percent of GDP while government debt rose to 71.2 percent of GDP. The Dutch government deficit and debt have now exceeded the European norms for the fourth year in a row.

Real disposable income of households in the Netherlands has fallen for the fifth year in a row: by 3.2 percent in 2012.

The volume of exports of goods grew nearly 5 percent in January relative to twelve months previously, equalling the growth rate in the fourth quarter of 2012.The volume of imports increased by more than 4 percent in January, just below the growth level of the previous three months.

The volume of exports of goods grew more than 5 percent in January relative to twelve months previously. Exports growth was slightly higher than in the fourth quarter of 2012.

The volume of exports of goods grew more than 3 percent in December relative to twelve months previously . The growth figure for October and November was approximately 5 percent.The volume of imports grew by 5 percent in December, about the same growth rate as in the two preceding months.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was more than 8 percent down in December 2012 from December 2011. The decline is more substantial than in October and November, when private sector investments were respectively more than 4 and nearly 7 percent down from one year previously.

According to the first estimate the Dutch economy shrank by 0.2 percent in the fourth quarter of 2012 compared to the third quarter and by 1.0 percent in the third quarter compared to the second quarter.

The volume of exports of goods grew nearly 4 percent in December relative to twelve months previously . The growth figure for October and November was approximately 5 percent. The volume of imports grew by nearly 5 percent in December, about the same growth rate as in the two preceding months.

The volume of exports of goods grew by more than 4 percent in November relative to twelve months previously. In October, the growth figure was more than 5 percent. The volume of imports grew by nearly 5 percent in November, the same growth rate as in October.

Dutch companies quoted on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange paid out nearly 17 billion euro in dividends to their shareholders last year. The total dividend payout is almost back at the level prior to the economic crisis.

The volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was nearly 11 percent down in November 2012 from November 2011. The decline is slightly more substantial than in October, when private sector investments were nearly 9 percent down from one year previously.

The volume of exports of goods grew by 5 percent in November relative to twelve months previously. In October, the growth figure was 6 percent. The volume of imports grew by 4 percent in November, the same growth rate as in October.

The volume of exports of goods grew by 6 percent in October relative to twelve months previously. The growth figure for exports is higher than in the four preceding months. The volume of imports grew by more than 4 percent in October, which is a slightly higher growth rate than in the four preceding months.

The Dutch economy shrank by 0.9 percent in the third quarter of 2012 compared with the previous quarter. The first estimate, published on 15 November, put the decrease at 1.1 percent.

In October 2012, the volume of private sector investments in tangible fixed assets was more than 4 percent down from October 2011. In September, private sector investments were 10 percent lower than one year previously.

The volume of imports and exports of goods grew by 6 percent in October relative to twelve months previously. The growth figures for imports and exports are higher than in the four preceding months.

The volume of Dutch goods exports grew by nearly 3 percent in September compared with twelve months previously. The increase in exports thus remains low for the third successive month. The volume of imports grew by more than 2 percent in September, slightly below the growth rate in the three preceding months.

The sale of natural gas is an important annual source of income for the Dutch government. Last year, revenues amounted to 12.4 billion euro. If natural gas revenues are not taken into account, the public deficit would have been much higher.

The Netherlands obtains 68 percent of its raw materials from elsewhere. Two thirds of the raw materials come from European countries.

The Dutch economy shrank by 1.1 percent in the third quarter compared to the preceding quarter. In the first two quarters, the Dutch economy had grown by 0.1 percent

The volume of goods exports grew by 2 percent in September compared with twelve months previously. The increase in exports thus remains low for the third successive month. The volume of imports grew by 3 percent in September, almost the same as the growth rate in the three preceding months.

The volume of exports of goods grew by more than 2 percent in August compared with twelve months previously. This increase is larger than in July, but smaller than in June. The volume of imports grew by nearly 4 percent in August, almost the same as the growth rate in June and July.

The volume of exports of goods grew by 2.5 percent in August compared with twelve months previously. This increase is larger than in July, but smaller than in June. The volume of imports grew by 3 percent in August, almost the same as the growth rate in June and July.

The so-called top sectors include more than 260 thousand businesses. Together, they accounted for more than one third of total output value in 2010. Two thirds of spending on innovation projects by the Dutch private sector occurred in these top sectors.

The volume of the exports of goods grew by more than 1 percent in July relative to twelve months previously. In May and June, Dutch exports had increased by 9 percent and 5 percent respectively.The volume of imports grew by more than 3 percent in July, which almost equals the growth rate in June.

The Dutch economy shrank by 0.4 percent in the second quarter of 2012 compared with the same period last year. This second estimate is 0.1 of a percent point higher than the first estimate published on 14 August.

The overall mortgage debt in the Netherlands amounted to nearly 670 billion euro at the end of 2011. At 111 percent of the gross domestic product, it is the highest mortgage debt in the eurozone. On the other hand, the value of all own homes is twice the amount of the this debt.

De Nederlandse economie 2011 (available in Dutch only). This publication gives the most complete possible picture of the economic developments in the Netherlands in 2011.

Tthe economic growth in the second quarter of 2012 was 0.2 percent relative to the first quarter, but economic growth was 0.5 percent down compared to the second quarter of 2011.

Last year, the annual amount deposited in life course savings schemes was the lowest since the scheme was introduced in 2006. Employees deposited 786 million euro, i.e. a decline by 13 percent relative to 2010.

The Dutch economy shrank by 0.8 percent in the first quarter of 2012 compared with the same quarter last year. This second estimate of economic growth is 0.3 of a percent point higher than the first estimate published on 15 May.

According to the first provisional estimate, the Dutch economy shrank by 1.1 percent in the first quarter of 2012 compared with the same period last year.

Labour costs in the Dutch private sector have risen at the same rate over the past decade as the average across the entire European Union. Between 2001 and 2011 Dutch labour costs per hour worked in industry and commercial services have increased by 36 percent.

According to the latest figures, nearly all provinces achieved economic growth last year. North Brabant, Utrecht and Flevoland enjoyed the fastest economic growth, but in the province of Zeeland the economy contracted marginally.

According to figures released today, Dutch government deficit amounted to 4.7 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2011.

The disposable household income has dropped for the fourth year in a row. Adjusted for inflation, the disposable household income dropped 0.4 percent in 2011, the same as in 2010 and this was largely caused by the fact that the wage increase of 1.8 percent was below the level of inflation (2.3 percent).

The Dutch economy shrank by 0.6 percent in the fourth quarter of 2011 compared with the same period in the previous year. This second estimate of economic growth is 0.1 of a percentage point higher than the previous estimate published on 15 February.

Due to the economic crisis, the Dutch private sector invested less in knowledge and know-how in 2009 than in 2008. Although the economy showed signs of recovery in 2010, investments in knowledge and know-how did not improve.

According to the first, provisional estimate, the Dutch economy declined by 0.7 percent in the fourth quarter of 2011 relative to the same period in 2010.

Dutch companies quoted at the Amsterdam Stock Exchange paid out nearly 12 billion euro in dividends to their shareholders in 2011, an increase by 600 million euro relative to 2010. Nearly all dividends were paid out by non-financial companies.

In the third quarter of this year, the number of employee jobs grew by 28 thousand relative to the third quarter of 2010, i.e. a modest increase by 0.3 percent.

In the third quarter of 2011, Dutch economic growth was 1.1 percent compared with the same period last year. This second estimate of economic growth is the same as the first estimate published on 15 November.

Just as in 2009, in 2010 the Netherlands had the second highest level of prosperity in the EU.

The activities by Dutch enterprises on and around the North Sea provide jobs, directly or indirectly, to almost a quarter of a million people.

Tthe Dutch economy grew by 1.1 percent in the third quarter of 2011 compared with same quarter last year.

The contribution of commercial services to the Dutch economy remained stable over the past decade. In the 1980s and 1990s, services became increasingly important.

In the second quarter of this year, the number of employee jobs was 51 thousand (0.6 percent) up on the same period in 2010. After correction for seasonal variation, the number of jobs increased by 25 thousand relative to the first quarter of 2011.

Dutch economic growth was 1.6 percent in the second quarter of 2011 compared with the second quarter last year. This second estimate of economic growth is 0.1 of a percent point higher than the first estimate published on 16 August.

The quality of life is high in the Netherlands compared to other European countries, but it seems impossible to retain this level of prosperity in the long run.

Last year, the labour costs per year of employment increased by 1.4 percent, the smallest increase since 1989. The average annual increase over the past decade was 3.3 percent.

The Dutch economy grew by 1.5 percent in the second quarter of 2011 compared to the same period last year. The growth was considerably less substantial than in the first quarter, when the gross domestic product (GDP) was 2.8 percent up on one year previously.

Over the past decade, the amount of jobs in the care sector increased by 385 thousand. Overall employment growth in the Netherlands was 515 thousand, so three quarters of new jobs in the past ten years were created in the care sector.

Dutch companies quoted on the stock exchange paid more than 7.6 billion euro in dividend in the first half of 2011. This is half a billion euro more than in the first half of 2010.

The Dutch economy improved by 2.8 percent in the first quarter of 2011 relative to one year previously. The second economic growth estimate is 0.4 percentage points below the level of the first estimate dating back to 13 May.

In the first quarter of 2011, the number of jobs of employees grew by 34 thousand relative to the first quarter of 2010.

Economic growth is often realised to the detriment of the environment.

According to the flash estimate, the Dutch economy grew by 3.2 percent in the first quarter of this year relative to the same quarter in 2010. This growth figure is the highest recorded in the last three years.

Employees saved 893 million euro in life-course savings accounts last year, approximately the same amount as in 2009. Withdrawals amounted to 233 million euro, an increase by 45 percent relative to one year previously.

The Dutch provinces realised economic growth in 2010 after the 2009 slump.

Investors in Dutch government bonds faced severe losses in the first quarter of 2011.

The disposable household income in 2010 was lower than in 2009. After correction for inflation, the decline was 1.4 percent, but consumer spending was 0.4 percent higher.

Last year’s government deficit stood at 5.4 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP), just under the 2009 level. The debt of the Dutch government increased further from 60.8 to 62.7 percent of the GDP.

In the fourth quarter of last year, the number of jobs of employees grew by 34 thousand (0.4 percent) relative to the fourth quarter of 2009. For the first time in eighteen months, the number of jobs has grown on an annual basis.

The Dutch economy grew by 2.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2010 compared with the same quarter in the previous year. This second estimate of economic growth is 0.1 of a percent point higher than the first estimate published on 15 February.

With 1.7 percent, last year’s economic growth rate in the Netherlands was significantly lower than Germany’s 3.6 percent.

Dutch economic growth in the fourth quarter of 2010 was 2.4 percent compared with the same period in the previous year.

For the second year in a row, less consumer credit was granted in the Netherlands than in the previous year.

Dutch companies quoted at the Amsterdam Stock Exchange paid out more than 11 billion euro in dividends to their shareholders in 2010.

Energy companies generated more electricity in 2009. As a result, CO2 emissions have grown relative to 2008 and to cover the increase, energy companies have to buy extra emission rights.

The number of jobs of employees in the third quarter of 2010 was 13 thousand (0.2 percent) down on the third quarter of 2009.

Dutch economic growth in the third quarter of 2010 was 1.9 percent compared with the third quarter of 2009. This second estimate of economic growth is 0.1 of a percent point higher than in the first estimate published on 12 November.

The rate of the demographic ageing process in the Netherlands will double in the years to come. In the period 2011-2015, the over-65 population will grow by half a million versus a quarter of a million in the period 2006-2010.

In 2009 the Netherlands had the second highest level of prosperity in the EU.

The production of goods and services bought by households cause greenhouse gas emissions. On average a household in the Netherlands causes over 22 tons of CO2 equivalents in emissions.

Due to the economic crisis, investments in knowledge and know-how by the Dutch private sector were more than 7 percent down in 2009 from 2008. Such a substantial decrease has not occurred in the period 1987-2008.

In the first nine months of 2010, the value of bonds increased by more than 23 billion euro. In this period, the value of newly issued bonds minus paid-off bonds was 27 billion euro.

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions caused to meet the economic needs of Dutch consumers were nearly 6 percent lower in 2009 than in 1996, but the total amount of global greenhouse gas emissions as a result of Dutch consumption, the so-called carbon footprint, has not changed.

Dutch economic growth in the third quarter of 2010 reached 1.8 percent compared to the same quarter of 2009.

Even in times of economic recession, most Dutch people are satisfied with many aspects that determine quality of life.

In the second quarter of this year, 63 thousand jobs of employees (0.8 percent) were lost compared to the second quarter of 2009.

Dutch economic growth was 2.2 percent in the second quarter of 2010 compared with the same quarter last year. This second estimate of economic growth is 0.1 of a percent point higher than the first estimate published on 13 August.

The public debt of the Netherlands remained stable in the first quarter of 2009. The debt-to-GDP ratio was just above the EMU limit of 60 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP), whereas the debt ratios of other European countries mounted in the course of 2009.

In the first six months of 2010, Dutch companies quoted on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange have paid more than 7 billion euro in dividends to their shareholders, an increase by 300 million euro relative to 2009. Nearly one quarter was paid as optional

An old saying runs as follows: ‘Sell in May and go away, but remember come back in September.’ This well-known proposition suggests that share prices follow a specific pattern throughout the year.

The Dutch economy grew by 2.1 percent in the second quarter of 2010 relative to the same quarter in 2009.

Last year, 169 billion euro was paid out in social security benefits, i.e. 30 percent of the total amount earned by all Dutch. Two thirds of social security concern old age provisions and support given to ill people.

The new data for 1969-2009 can be accessed now.

Last year, employees saved 908 million euro in life course schemes, an increase by over 10 percent relative to 2008. They withdrew more than 164 million euro in 2009, over 35 percent more than in the preceding year.

Dutch and foreign tourists spent 35.2 billion euro in the Netherlands last year, 3.8 percent less than one year previously. If price changes are taken into account, the decline was even more dramatic (4.7 percent).

Non-financial companies in the Netherlands repaid 3.0 billion euro more on outstanding loans than they borrowed in new loans in the first quarter of 2010. The credit crisis and uncertain economic prospects have led companies to borrow less than they repay for a year now.

In the first quarter of this year, 156 thousand jobs of employees (2.0 percent) were lost compared to the first quarter of 2009. If seasonal effects are taken into account, 56 thousand jobs were lost relative to the fourth quarter of last year.

The Dutch economic growth in the first quarter of 2010 at 0.1 percent compared with the same quarter last year.

The economy shrank in all twelve provinces in 2009.

The capital owned by Dutch households has grown by 136 billion euro in 2009, the most substantial increase ever recorded in the span of one year. This means that 57 percent of the capital that evaporated in 2008 as a result of the global financial crisis was regained in 2009.

The government deficit over 2009 stood at 5.3 percent of the GDP, as against a government surplus of 0.7 percent of the GDP in 2008.

In the fourth quarter of last year, 147 thousand jobs of employees were lost compared to the fourth quarter of 2008, a reduction by 1.8 percent.

The Dutch economy shrank by 2.2 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009 compared with the same quarter in 2008. This second estimate is unchanged from the first estimate published on 12 February 2009.

The Dutch government issued bonds and short-term loans worth nearly 240 billion euro on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange, about three quarters of newly issued bonds last year. The government requires extra money to fund its expenses.

Dutch economy shrank by 2.2 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009 relative to the same quarter one year previously.

Dutch households took out nearly 9.7 billion euro in consumer credit in 2009, i.e. 1.2 billion down on 2008 and the lowest level of the past decade.

Dutch companies quoted on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange paid out more than 10 billion euro in dividends to their shareholders in 2009, a decrease by 8 billion euro relative to 2008. Financial companies in particular paid out less.

In the third quarter of 2009, the overall disposable income of Dutch households was 3.0 billion euro (i.e. 3.3 percent corrected for inflation) down on one year previously, but their financial capital grew in the second and third quarter of last year, mainly due to positive price developments on the financial markets.

In the third quarter of 2009 there were 140 thousand jobs of employees less than in the third quarter of 2008. This is the biggest drop in over 25 years.

The Dutch economy shrank by 3.7 percent in the third quarter of 2009 compared with the same quarter last year. Although this second estimate is unchanged from the first estimate, published on 13 November, there were some underlying revisions.

Total assets in the Netherlands were worth around 3.5 trillion euro in 2008. This is the equivalent of just over 210 thousand euro per inhabitant, and is more than double the value in 1996.

Dutch industry produced only 0.3 percent more per unit of labour, capital goods, energy, materials and services in 2008 than in 2007. This is the lowest productivity growth since 2002.

The Dutch economy shrank by 3.7 percent in the third quarter of 2009 compared with the same quarter last year. This decrease is considerably smaller than the decrease in the first half of the year. Compared with the second quarter of this year, the economy grew again in the third quarter.

In 2007, there were 109 thousand full-time jobs in the environmental sector, an increase by 25 percent relative to 1995.

In the first three quarters of 2009, Dutch households took out 7.4 billion euro in consumer loans, 12 percent less than in the same period last year. Since the outbreak of the economic crisis, consumers have become more cautious.

In the first three quarters of 2009, companies quoted on the stock exchange paid 8.6 billion euro less in dividends to their shareholders. They also bought back nearly 1 billion euro worth of own shares.

Greenhouse gas emissions caused by Dutch transport companies have increased by nearly 80 percent since 1990. This is largely due to the increase in international transport by Dutch companies and a growing appetite for travelling among the Dutch.

In some parts of the Netherlands, especially in the periphery of the country, the population will decrease substantially in the next thirty years. In one quarter of Dutch municipalities the number of inhabitants will fall by more than 2.5 percent by 2040; a total of one quarter of a million inhabitants.

In the first six months of 2009, public debt has amounted to more than 356 billion (bn) euro, an increase by nearly 10 bn euro relative to the end of 2008. The government debt-to-GDP ratio was 61.1 percent.

In the second quarter of this year, the number of jobs of employees declined by 72 thousand relative to the second quarter of 2008.

The Dutch economy shrank by 5.4 percent in the second quarter of 2009 compared with the same quarter last year.

Economic growth will be increasingly under pressure in the decades to come as a result of the ageing process in the population. To secure economic growth, measures will have to be taken to create jobs for more people. One of the measures that are being considered is raising retirement age.

Dutch employees deposited a total 783 million euro in accounts for life course savings schemes in 2008. This is more than 7 percent less than in 2007.

The Dutch economy shrank by 5.1 percent in the second quarter of 2009 compared with the same quarter last year.

In the Netherlands people entitled to benefits received 159 billion euro in social security payments in 2008. This is the equivalent of about 27 percent of the Gross Domestic Product, which is what all Dutch people earned together. Most social security benefits are paid to old age provision and support for people who are ill.

In 2007 there was no further increase in the foreign influence on Dutch non-financial businesses. The non-financial businesses realised a value added of 322 billion euro, of which 26 percent was attributable to businesses under foreign control.

In February of this year, the "Monitor Duurzaam Nederland 2009" was published. In September 2009 the English version ("Sustainability Monitor for the Netherlands 2009") will be released. This short paper is a primer for the report: it provides the executive summary as well as details on how to obtain a copy of the English version

In the first quarter of 2009, net profits of non-financial companies amounted to 22.7&nbsp;billion euro, i.e. 10.6&nbsp;billion euro down on the first&nbsp;quarter of 2008. For the fifth quarter running, net profits are below the level of the same quarter one year previously.

Together, Dutch and foreign tourists spent 36.9 billion euro in the Netherlands in 2008, 2.8 percent more than in 2007. However, if price developments are taken into account, this results in a fall of 0.9 percent in tourist spending. Dutch tourists account for about 80 percent of tourist expenditure.

Economic growth slowed down in nearly all Dutch provinces last year. Growth in the Randstad provinces was at or above the nationwide average of 2 percent.

The Dutch economy has become more and more interwoven with global trade in the last thirty years. This means that it has become more vulnerable to declining international demand.

In the first quarter of 2009 there were 23 thousand more jobs of employees than in the same quarter of 2008. This brought the number of jobs to 7.9 million.

The Dutch government spent 270.3 billion euro in 2008. This is the equivalent of 45.5 percent of the Dutch gross domestic product (GDP).

The economic recession has hit the European manufacturing industry particularly hard. In the Netherlands, however, the manufacturing sector has suffered less than average.

The Dutch economy saw a negative growth of 4.5 percent in the first quarter of 2009 compared to the same quarter of 2008. This is the largest decline in the Dutch economy in the post-war period.

Public debt in the Netherlands grew by 87 billion euro to 346 billion euro last year. Government debt as a percentage of GDP has increased by 12.6 percentage points and amply exceeds the EU average of 2.8 percentage points.

The aggregate amount deposited by Dutch households in online savings accounts exceeded 55 billion euro by the end of 2008, i.e. 11 billion down on the end of 2007.

As a result of the global finacial crisis, the value of shares and bonds owned by Dutch households has decreased by 66 billion euro last year. One quarter of the value of shares and one tenth of the total value of bonds has evaporated.

As a consequence of the credit crisis, falling share prices have resulted in continued losses for Dutch pension funds and insurance companies since the third quarter of 2007.

The overall government debt has risen dramatically in 2008 by 87.4 billion euro. By the end of last year, goverment debt amounted to 346.2 billion euro, i.e. 58.2 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP).

The number of jobs of employees grew by 108 thousand in the fourth quarter of last year relative to the same quarter of 2007. Employment also grew relative to the third quarter.

The formation of the EMS should ultimately lead to a reduction of economic differences between the various member states. In recent decades, economic differences between the various eurozone countries have indeed become less prominent.

The Dutch economy shrank by 0.6 percent in the fourth quarter of 2008 compared with the same quarter in the previous year.

Overdrafts on current accounts rose by 5.5 percent in 2008 relative to 2007. Dutch consumers borrowed 1 percent more in 2008 than in the previous year.

Dutch companies quoted on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange paid out nearly 18 billion euro in dividends in 2008. The total return was marginally lower than in 2007.

The Euronext bond market in Amsterdam has grown considerably last year despite the global financial crisis. The total value of bonds issued on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange increased by 15 percent to 780 billion euro.

The total amount lost by Dutch households over the first three quarters of 2008 as a consequence of the crash on the stock exchange was unprecedented.

The Dutch economy dropped from a period of booming to zero growth in the course of 2008. Although economic growth was 2.7 percent on average in the first three quarters compared with the first three quarters of 2007, in the second and third quarters it did not grow at all.

Figures from Statistics Netherlands put Dutch economic growth at 1.8 percent in the third quarter of 2008 compared with twelve months previously. This is the lowest growth rate since the beginning of 2005.

According to figures from Statistics Netherlands, there were 108 thousand more jobs for employees in the Netherlands in the third quarter of 2008 than in the same quarter in 2007. This is an increase of 1.4 percent.

The economic downswing will not necessarily have an immediate effect on household income in the Netherlands. Employment is still growing, and collectively negotiated wage increases are larger for 2008 than for 2007.

The local government level is fairly comprehensive in the Netherlands. But&nbsp;local government, including municipalities and provinces, is&nbsp; to a large extent financially dependent on The Hague, where the central government has its seat.

Dutch economic growth was 1.8 percent in the third quarter of 2008 relative to the same period last year.

In the first six months of this year, total Dutch household spending was 1.1 billion down on the first half of 2007. The extra money allowed them to keep up their spending pattern and leave their personal capital intact.

According to the Kyoto Protocol, the emission of greenhouse gases was reduced by 4 percent over the period 1990-2007.

Net profits of non-financial companies in the Netherlands amounted to 19 billion euro in the second quarter of 2008. This is the lowest level for three years.

Around 178 billion euro of the value Dutch companies on the Amsterdam stock exchange disappeared into thin air in the first nine months of 2008.

In the second quarter of 2008, the number of jobs of employees increased by 154 thousand (2.0 percent) relative to the same quarter last year.

Figures from Statistics Netherlands put Dutch economic growth at 3.0 percent in the second quarter of 2008 compared with the same period last year.

According to a first estimate released by Statistics Netherlands, economic growth was 2.8 percent in the second quarter of 2008 relative to the same period last year.

The non-residential construction sector was booming last year. Companies also invested large amounts in repairs and renovation of non-residential buildings.

In the last thirty years, more and more Dutch consumers have been thinking more positively about putting money into savings accounts. Together with Denmark and Luxembourg, the Netherlands is now one of the EU countries with the most positive attitude towards saving.

Dutch financial institutions suffered only limited effects of the international credit crisis in 2007. The value of their financial assets diminished by only 32 billion euro as a result of lower exchange rates.

In 2006, foreign influence on the non-financial private sector increased further. Non-financial companies realised a total value added to the amount of 305 billion euro.

Dutch and foreign tourists spent a total 35.3 billion euro in the Netherlands in 2007. This is 5.5 percent more than in 2006.

Economic growth in Utrecht and Flevoland exceeded 4 percent in 2007, as against 3.5 percent nationwide. Flevoland maintained its leadership position, but has to share it with Utrecht.

In 2025, there will be 8 million households in the Netherlands, an increase by 800 thousand relative to early 2007.

Employees in the Netherlands saved 840 million euro in life course savings and insurance schemes in 2007. This is 70 million euro less than in 2006.

There were 172 thousand more employees in the Netherlands in the first quarter of 2008 than in the same quarter last year. This 2.2 percent increase is high in a historical perspective, but still lower than the 2.7 percent in 2007.

Dutch economic growth in the first quarter of 2008 was 3.3 percent on the same period last year. It was realised with one working day fewer than in 2007. This second estimate of economic growth is 0.2 of a percent point higher than the fist estimate published on 15 May.

Value added tax was introduced in the Netherlands in 1969. In that year it generated just over 2.5 billion euro in revenue; nearly 40 years later VAT revenue amounted to nearly 43 billion euro.

First estimate puts economic growth at 3.1 percent in the first quarter of 2008 on the same quarter last year.

In 2006, revenues from oil and natural gas extraction were the highest since 1990.

The real disposable income of Dutch households rose by nearly 4 percent in 2007, the highest growth since 2001.

The Randstad region is the largest economic urban region in the European Union (EU) after Paris, London and Milan, but the per capita production in the Randstad is lower than in many other urban regions.

The national debt amounted to nearly 254 billion euro by the end of last year, 2 billion euro down on the end of 2006.

There were 7.8 million paid jobs in the Netherlands in the fourth quarter of 2007. This is an increase by 170 thousand relative to one year previously.

Dutch economic growth in the fourth quarter of 2007 was 4.5 percent relative to one year previously. The second economic growth estimate is 0.1 percentage points higher than the first dating back to 14 February.

Once in every four calendar years a leap day is intercalated. The year 2008 is a leap year, but the extra day appears to have little effect on the economy.

In 2007, mineral extraction contributed 17 billion euro (more than 3 percent) to the GDP. In recent years, the proportion has grown.

Based on Statistics Netherlands’ first estimate of fourth quarter growth in 2007, Dutch economic growth in 2007 came to 3.5 percent.

Dutch consumers borrowed 10.4 billion euro in 2007, the same amount as in 2006.

The Dutch economy grew 4.2 percent in the third quarter of 2007 relative to one year previously.

In the second quarter of 2007, the number of jobs for employees had grown by 206 thousand relative to the same quarter last year.

The Dutch economy is becoming more and more environmentally sustainable.

Dutch economic growth was 4.1 percent in the third quarter of 2007 compared wit the same period last year. This is the highest growth rate for more than seven years.

Figures put Dutch economic growth at 2.6 percent in the second quarter of 2007 compared with the same quarter last year.

Dutch economy improved 2.4 percent in the second quarter of 2007 relative to one year previously.

The disposable income of Dutch households rose by nearly 4 percent in 2006.

The province of Utrecht had the highest economic growth in 2006: just over 4 percent. This is mainly the result of the fact that many companies in the business services and wholesale trade sectors are located in this province.

Dutch economic growth was 2.5 percent in the first quarter of 2007 compared with the same period last year. This increase was realised with one working day fewer than in 2006. The result is the same as the first provisional estimate, published on 15 May.

Dutch economic growth was 2.5 percent in the first quarter of 2007 compared with the same quarter last year.

For the first time in six years, the difference between government revenue and expenditure was positive in 2006.

The Dutch economy grew by 2.7 percent in the fourth quarter of 2006 compared with the same quarter in 2005. The growth was realised with one working day fewer.

The Dutch economy grew by 2.9 percent in 2006. This is nearly twice the growth in 2005.

Dutch households borrowed less money for consumption purposes in 2006 than in the eight preceding years. The outstanding debt on consumer loans has fallen further.

In the third quarter of 2006 there were 110 thousand more jobs for employees in the Netherlands than in the same quarter last year.

The Dutch economy saw a 2.7 percent growth in the third quarter van 2006.

The first estimate of Statistics Netherlands’ quarterly national accounts puts Dutch economic growth at 2.6 percent in the third quarter of 2006.

In the second quarter of 2006, economic growth in the Netherlands reached 2.8 percent.

Dutch economic growth was 2.4 percent in the second quarter of 2006. Employment also continued to rise.

According to provisional figures published by Statistics Netherlands, the 2005 economic growth rate in the provinces of Flevoland and Utrecht was considerably higher than in the rest of the country.

Dutch economy grew by 1.5 percent in 2005, but taking inflation into account, household incomes declined once again.

In the first quarter of 2006 there were 35 thousand more jobs than in the last quarter of 2005.

The Dutch economy saw robust growth in the first quarter of 2006. The Dutch gross domestic product (GDP) was up by 2.9 percent on the year before.

The series Occasional papers are publications discussing fundamental theoretical orstatistical issues related to national accounting, or publications on analyses based onnational accounts figures.They are written in English and are especially aimed at experts on national accounts.

The Dutch economy saw robust growth in the first quarter of 2006. The gross domestic product (GDP) was up by 2.9 percent on the year before.

The total amount on save-as-you-earn accounts was halved in 2005. Many employees saving through these schemes made use of the opportunity to withdraw their money prematurely.

The balance of the Dutch government budget according to the EMU definition came to -0.3 percent of GDP for 2005. This means the government deficit stayed well within the limits of the European 3 percent norm.

There were slightly more jobs in the fourth quarter of 2005 than in the third quarter. After corrections for seasonal effects the number of employee jobs rose by 9 thousand.

The growth rate of the Dutch economy in 2005 reached 1.1 percent. This is lower than the 1.7 percent growth rate in 2004, but well above the figures for the years 2002-2003.

Dutch economic growth at 0.9 percent in 2005. This is nearly half the growth of 1.7 percent in 2004, but well above the zero increase in 2002-2003.

The Dutch population borrowed less in the form of consumer credit in 2005 than in 2004.

In the third quarter of 2005 the number of jobs was slightly higher than in the second quarter. The seasonally corrected figures show an increase of 7 thousand jobs of employees.

The growth rate of the Dutch economy was 1.3 percent in the third quarter of 2005.

The Dutch economy grew by 0.9 percent in the third quarter of 2005. The gross domestic product (GDP) was 0.9 percent higher than one year previously.

The economic growth rate in the Dutch province Flevoland in 2004 was substantially higher than the economic growth rate in the rest of the country. The growth rate of Haarlemmermeer was the highest of the lower regional levels.

There were about the same number of jobs in the second quarter of 2005 as in the first. The seasonally adjusted figure shows an increase of 4 thousand jobs of employees.

Real spendable household income fell again in 2004. Enterprises made more profits.

For the first time since 2003, Dutch economic growth was negative again in the first quarter of 2005. According to the second estimate of Statistics Netherlands’ quarterly national accounts, the gross domestic product (GDP) was 0.5 percent smaller than in the same quarter last year.

The number of employee jobs was 75 thousand lower in the first quarter of 2005 than twelve months previously. After seasonal corrections the number of jobs was 21 thousand lower in the first quarter than in the fourth quarter of 2004.

There was a press release on first quarter economic growth in 2005, the second estimate, scheduled on Thursday 30 June 2005. This press release has been postponed.

After a revision of definitions and assessment methods, the 2001 gross domestic product (GDP) is more than 18 billion euro (4.3 percent) higher than the GDP that was previously published. Other economic indicators like household consumption, the balance on the current account of the Netherlands with the rest of the world, labour volume, government debt and deficit and the gross national income (GNI) were subject to revision.

Dutch economic growth fell in the first quarter of 2005 for the first time since 2003. The gross domestic product was 0.3 percent lower than in the first quarter of last year. The first quarter of 2005 had one working day fewer than the first quarter of 2004, which might have had an effect on economic growth. Employment fell again in the first quarter of 2005. However, the decrease was slightly smaller than in the four previous quarters.

After a revision of definitions and assessment methods, the 2001 gross domestic product (GDP) is more than 18 billion euro (4.3 percent) higher than the GDP that was previously published. Other economic indicators like household consumption, the balance on the current account of the Netherlands with the rest of the world, labour volume, government debt and deficit and the gross national income (GNI) were subject to revision.

In the fourth quarter of 2004 there were 92 thousand jobs of employees less than in the fourth quarter van 2003. This brought job losses down to under 100 thousand for the first time in a year. The wage costs per employee were up by 2.4 percent on the year before. The rise in wage costs in 2004 was the lowest since 1997.

The Dutch government deficit according to the EMU definition was 2.3 percent in 2004, once again within the limits of the European norm of 3 percent. In 2003 the deficit was still 3.2 percent. Central government accounted for most of the decrease in the deficit. The government debt according to the EMU definition was 55.2 percent of GDP.

The savings of private individuals reached almost 200 billion euro in 2004. People put almost 11 billion euro more into their savings accounts than they took out. Outstanding debt on consumer credit increased to almost 18 billion euro in 2004. Current accounts were almost 7 billion euro in the red on 31 December 2004.

In the third quarter of 2004 there were 109 thousand employee jobs less than in the third quarter of 2003. In the second quarter of 2004 the number of job losses was 119 thousand.

Dutch economic growth came to 1.5 percent in the third quarter of 2004 compared with the same quarter in 2003. The is the largest increase in the volume of gross domestic product (GDP) in the last three years. The figure is 0.1 of a percent point up on the first estimate.

The Dutch economy saw a growth of 1.4 percent in the third quarter of 2004 compared to the third quarter of 2003. This is the highest growth rate in three years. Employment decreased a little less in the third quarter than in the two preceding quarters.

In the second quarter of 2004 there were 119 thousand employee jobs less than in the second quarter of 2003. This means job losses increased to 1.6 percent. The private sector had 148 thousand fewer jobs than the the year before. Jobs in government and care together were up by 29 thousand. The increase in wage costs per employee was reduced to 1.9 percent.

The Dutch economy in the second quarter of 2004 saw a 1.0 percent growth rate compared to one year earlier. The growth rate is virtually the same as in the first quarter of 2004. Although employment in the second quarter of 2004 fell, it did so by less than in the previous quarters.

In 2003 the western part of the Netherlands (comprising the provinces of North Holland, South Holland, Utrecht and Zeeland) was least affected by the recession. In the provinces of Gelderland, Overijssel and particularly North Brabant and Limburg economic decline was above the national level. In the provinces of Groningen, Friesland and Drenthe the economic situation was strongly affected by the extraction of natural gas.

In 2003 the real spendable income of households decreased for the first time in ten years. Corporate profits shrank but there were higher profits in banking. The budget deficit went up, mainly caused by higher government expenditure.

In the first quarter of 2004 there were 107 thousand employee jobs less than in the first quarter of 2003. This means that job losses reached 1.4 percent. For the first time the number of women’s jobs was down on the previous year. There were 153 thousand fewer jobs in the private sector. The number of jobs in government and care was up 46 thousand. The wage cost increase per employee fell to 2.6 percent.

Employees who save via company savings plans deposited 1.3 billion euro in these schemes in 2003. This is much less than in previous years, when total deposits fluctuated around 2.2 billion euro. The decrease was caused by a change in the 1994 law on company savings schemes. A total amount of 5.6 billion euro became available from company savings schemes in 2003, and was deposited into many private savings accounts by households.

Dutch economic growth was minus 0.7 percent in 2003. The last time the gross domestic product decreased in the space of one year was in 1982. GDP was 0.4 percent down in the fourth quarter of 2003 on the same quarter in 2002. The first estimates, published on 12 February, put economic growth at -0.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2003 and at -0.8 percent for the whole year.

The central government deficit over 2003 according to the EMU definition amounts to 14.4 billion euro, i.e. 3.2 percent of the GDP. This is a first estimate based on figures which recently became available. The deficit thus exceeds the EMU norm (3 percent) by 0.2 percent.

Figures released today that Dutch households saved over 30 percent more in 2003 than in 2002. Moreover, the amount they borrowed in consumer credit in 2003 was hardly higher than in 2002. The total amount that consumers were overdrawn on current accounts was slightly higher at the end of 2003 than twelve months previously. The saving and borrowing patterns of Dutch consumers are in line with the low level of consumer confidence and less spending on durable goods last year.

The series Occasional papers are publications discussing fundamental theoretical orstatistical issues related to national accounting, or publications on analyses based onnational accounts figures.They are written in English and are especially aimed at experts on national accounts.