More Dutch and European young adults living at home

© Hollandse Hoogte
In 2017, relatively more people in their late twenties in the Netherlands were living with their parents compared to 2010. This also holds true for most other EU countries. The most significant shift was seen in Ireland and Belgium. This is evident from figures released by Eurostat.

Last year, 18 percent of 25 to 29-year-olds in the Netherlands were living with one or both of their parents, against 42 percent in the entire European Union. The share of 25 to 29-year-olds living with their parents was highest in Malta, followed by Southern and Eastern Europe, Croatia and Greece. The lowest shares are seen in the Nordic EU countries.

Among 20 to 24-year-olds, similar but less significant differences exist between EU countries. In most EU countries, more than half of people in their early twenties live with their parents. Denmark, Finland and Sweden are the only exceptions.

Highest share in Ireland and among people in their late twenties

The group of people in their late twenties living with their parents has increased in recent years. In 2017, 42 percent of 25 to 29-year-olds in the EU were living with their parents, versus 38 percent in 2010, the first year that figures were available for all member states. In the neighbouring country Belgium, the share rose from 21 to 35 percent. This was the sharpest increase after Ireland, where the percentage of young adults living at home went up from 36 percent in 2010 to 47 percent in 2016, the most recent year with available figures for this member state. In comparison: the share in the Netherlands rose from 14 percent in 2010 to 18 percent in 2017.

Percentage point of difference, 2010-2017 ( percentage point)
 25 to 29-year-olds living at home
België11.4
Bulgarije-6.3
Tsjechië-3.4
Denemarken2.2
Duitsland5.1
Estland2.8
Ierland11.9
Griekenland6.4
Spanje10.8
Frankrijk2.5
Kroatië9.7
Italië5.3
Cyprus11.1
Letland-1.9
Litouwen5.2
Luxemburg9
Hongarije-2.9
Malta5.2
Nederland3.7
Oostenrijk-8.3
Polen2.8
Portugal-0.6
Roemenië-0.4
Slovenië-2.7
Slowakije0.6
Finland1.9
Zweden1.7
Verenigd Koninkrijk-3.2
1Figures on Ireland and the UK are for the year 2016.
Source: CBS, Eurostat

Share of young men living at home highest in Croatia

In each EU country, 25 to 29-year-old men are more likely to live at home than their female peers. At 86 percent, the highest share within the EU is seen in Croatia, followed by Greece, Slovakia, Malta and Italy. Of Dutch young men, 24 percent are living with their parents, nearly half of the EU average of 50 percent.

The figures in this news release are based on the survey EU-SILC (Statistics on Income and Living Conditions) by Eurostat and deviate slightly from CBS figures on young adults living at home, which are based on register data.