fewer apprenticeships for mbo students in 2013

28/11/2014 15:00

According to figures released by Statistics Netherlands this week, as a result of the economic situation in the Netherlands nearly 18 thousand fewer apprenticeship places were available in 2013 than in 2012 for students in the apprenticeship-based track (bbl) of senior secondary vocational education (mbo); a drop of nearly 10 percent. Private sector companies spent 122 million euros less on supervising mbo students in work-based learning schemes. Moreover, companies that did take on apprentices offered more short-term contracts. The number of teaching hours per mbo student also fell, except in the care sector.

More traineeships for mbo and hbo students

The number traineeships for mbo students in the school-based track (bol) of mbo did rise in 2013, by nearly 8 thousand. As mbo students may only opt for the bbl track if they have been assigned an apprenticeship place, more pupils may have opted for the bol track. Even though the number of hours per trainee fell in all sectors except care, spending by companies on the supervision of mbo students in the school-based track rose by 25 million euros to 785 million euros. In addition to the increase in the number of trainees in the school-based track higher wage costs for supervisors also pushed up total spending.

The number of trainees also rose in higher professional education (hbo): by nearly 2 thousand. As a result, companies spent 5 million euros more on supervising full-time hbo students. The number of students in a dual hbo track (work periods alternated with lecture periods) fell, on the other hand, so that companies spent 2 million euros less on these students.

Students in work-based learning schemes by type of education

Students in work-based learning schemes by type of education

Companies spend less on work-based learning schemes

Overall, companies certified to supervise work periods of pupils and students spent nearly 2.4 billion euros on teaching mbo and hbo students practical work skills in 2013, 94 million euros less than in 2012. As fewer mbo and hbo students are in tracks involving work-based learning, overall supervision costs fell, although for mbo students in school-based tracks and full-time hbo students they rose by 30 million euros.

Spending by companies on work-based learning schemes by type of education (in 2010 prices)

Spending by companies on work-based learning schemes by type of education (in 2010 prices)

Less spent on work-based learning in technology disciplines

Spending on work-based learning was relatively highest for students in technology disciplines: 874 million euros, 11 percent less than in 2010. This reflects the diminishing interest in technological disciplines; in the technology sector, the number of mbo students in apprenticeships and traineeships fell by 17 thousand in the period 2010-2013, to 116 thousand. In higher professional education, the number of students in work-based learning schemes rose by over 2 thousand in the same period, to 27 thousand. Spending per student was highest in technology disciplines: 8,800 euros for apprentices and 4 thousand euros for trainees. In economics disciplines spending on supervision was 5,700 euros for apprentices and 2,200 euros for trainees. This sector had the most students in work-based tracks:nearly two-thirds of all hbo trainees were in economics students.

Students in work-based learning schemes (excl. agriculture)

Students in work-based learning schemes (excl. agriculture)

Spending by companies on work-based learning (mbo and hbo) by discipline1)

Spending by companies on work-based learning (mbo and hbo) by discipline1)

1) in constant prices (2010 = 100)

Care sector spends more spent on work-based learning

The care sector spent more on practical supervision of students in the period 2010-2013, while the economics sector spent 1.2 percent less. As a result, spending by the care sector nearly equalled that of the economics sector: they both accounted for 29 percent of total spending on student supervision. When the survey of spending on work-based learning started, in 1995,  the economics sector accounted for 27 percent and care for 18 percent of spending.