Large differences in purchasing power developments between common occupations

11/01/2011 15:00

The purchasing power of the employed labour force in the Netherlands rose by 2.5 percent in 2009. This is larger than the increase in 2008. For the total population, purchasing power rose by significantly less in 2009: 1.5 percent. Among the most common occupations, purchasing power improved most for retailers and cleaners in 2009.

Retailers and cleaners: plus 3.5 percent

There are substantial differences in purchasing power developments between the ten most common occupations. Retailers and cleaners gained most, with a 3.5 percent increase in purchasing power. For system developers, primary school teachers, loaders, accountants, childcare managers and carers for the elderly, too, purchasing power rose by more than average.

For lorry drivers, administrative workers and shop assistants the increase was below average, at around  2 percent.

Purchasing power development by occupation, 2009

Purchasing power development by occupation, 2009

Purchasing power development by occupation, 2008

Purchasing power development by occupation, 2008

Relatively large differences between 2008 and 2009

Purchasing power per occupation also varies strongly from year to year. In 2009 it rose strongly for retailers, loaders and lorry drivers, for example, while in 2008 it rose only slightly for these groups, and for lorry drivers it even decreased.

Accountants and system developers also benefited significantly more in 2009 than in 2008. Only for childcare managers and carers for the elderly did purchasing power increase by about the same amount in both years.

Linda Moonen, Ferdy Otten and Astrid Pleijers