More and more employees want to work to the age of 65

06/05/2010 15:00

The share of employees in the Netherlands who say they want to work until they reach the age of 65 years has doubled in the space of four years: from 21 percent in 2005 to 42 percent in 2009. However, fewer want to stay in work after their 65th birthday: 13%. These are some of the results of the NEA, the Dutch national survey of working conditions conducted at the end of 2009 by TNO Knowledge for Business and Statistics Netherlands, with support from the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment.

In 2009, more than 40 percent of both younger and older employees in the Netherlands said they were  willing to work until the age of 65. With respect to not wanting to work to this age there was a difference between younger and older employees. About  4 in 10 employees older than 55 years say they do not want to work until they are 65. Among employees younger 25 years this is only 2 out of 10. One third of younger employees said they did not know to what age they wanted to work.
There is not much difference between men and women in their willingness to work until 65. Relatively more women say they do not yet know. Relatively more employees with a high education level than those with intermediate and low education levels say they want to work until they are 65.

The willingness to work until 65 years is lowest in the construction industry. Only one third of workers in this sector say they want to work until they are 65, while half say they do not want to work until that age. In manufacturing, transport and communication, public administration and financial services, too, relatively many people do not want work until 65 years. In agriculture and fishery, education, and business services on the other hand, relatively many employees say they do want to work until the age of 65.

Fewer people are willing to work past the age of 65. Thirteen percent of employees say they want to retire later than 65. Around 58 percent say they do not want to work past the age of 65 and the remainder (29 percent) do not yet know. There are differences between the groups of employees in their willingness to work past their 65th birthday. Relatively more men (15 percent) than women (10 percent) say they want to work to an older age, and more employees with a high education level (18 percent) than with a low (10 percent) and intermediate (11 percent) level. Many younger employees do not yet know whether they will want to work to an older age. Older employees are more likely to have made up their mind: just over 6 out of 10 say they do not want to work after their 65th birthday. For younger employees this is 4 out of 10.