Surinamese and Antillean parents most frequent recipients of childcare allowances

23/03/2010 15:00

Requests for childcare allowances were submitted for 30 percent of children under the age of twelve in 2008. Surinamese and Antillean parents most often receive childcare allowances, Turkish and Moroccan parents the least.

Most requests for childcare allowances submitted by Surinamese and Antillean parents

In 2008, requests for childcare allowances involved more than 700 thousand children. Surinamese, Antillean and Aruban parents much more often submitted requests for childcare allowances than groups from other ethnic backgrounds. In 2008, it concerned 35 percent of Surinamese children and 45 percent of Antillean and Aruban children.
The high percentages are due to the relatively high labour participation rate of both fathers and mothers in these ethnic groups. The large number of single-parent families in the Surinamese, Antillean and Aruban communities in the Netherlands also plays a part in this respect. 

Turkish and Moroccan parents rarely make use of childcare provisions

Turkish and Moroccan parents relatively rarely apply for childcare allowances. In 2008, childcare allowance requests were submitted for 15 percent of Turkish and 12 percent Moroccan children under the age of twelve. Turkish and Moroccan parents − notably the mothers − rarely work in paid jobs compared to other ethnic groups.
Altogether, authorities received childcare allowance requests for 23 percent of children with a non-western background, as against 32 percent for native Dutch children.

Childcare allowance requests for children under the age of twelve, 2008

Childcare allowance requests for children under the age of twelve, 2008

Share of formal care higher among people with non-western background

In 2007, 38 percent of families with a non-western background and children under the age of thirteen received childcare allowances versus half of families with a native Dutch background. Non-western families more often than native Dutch families turned to formal care. Non-western families also less often turned to relatives, friends or neighbours to help them out.

Main type of childcare provided to families with children under the age of thirteen1), 2007

Main type of childcare provided to families with children under the age of thirteen1), 2007

Kathleen Geertjes