Male part-timers more often than women decide to increase their working hours

11/03/2010 15:00

Nearly one in twelve people in work would like to increase their working hours. Male part-timers more often want to increase their working hours than women and they appear to be more successful in achieving that too.

Notably men in small and medium-sized part-time jobs would like to expand their working hours

In the period 2002/2008, 6 percent of men in the employed labour force would like two work longer hours, as against 11 percent of women. Notably part-timers working fewer than 28 hours a week would like to expand their working hours.

More male than female part-timers want to expand their working hours. Twice as many men as women in middle-sized part-time jobs (20 to 28 hours a week), for example,  would like to work longer hours. Since far more women than men are working on a part-time basis, in total more women than men are looking for jobs allowing them to work more hours.

Proportion in the employed labour force seeking to work longer hours, 2002/2008

Proportion in the employed labour force seeking to work longer hours, 2002/2008

Male part-timers more often manage to expand their working hours

About 38 percent of people who wished to expand their working hours in the period 2002/2008 managed to realise their objective one year later. Part-timers were twice as often successful in realising expansion of working hours than their full-time counterparts. Male part-timers were more successful than female part-timers; 56 percent of men against 43 percent of women active in middle-sized part-time jobs succeeded in finding jobs allowing them to work longer hours.

Persons in the employed labour force who would like to work more hours in 2002/2008 and managed to do so one year later

Persons in the employed labour force who would like to work more hours in 2002/2008 and managed to do so one year later

Jannes de Vries