Unemployment hits sector business services

22/10/2009 15:00

In the first six months of 2009, unemployment grew in those sectors where the number of male employees is relatively high, e.g. business services, manufacturing industry, trade and transport and communication. In sectors women constitute the majority, e.g. education, fewer people lost their jobs.

Number of unemployed doubled

In the first quarter of this year, the employed labour force comprised 7.4 million persons. In the second quarter, nearly 100 thousand became unemployed. The number of people who recently lost their jobs has doubled relative to the same period one year previously.

Unemployed who were still employed in the previous quarter

Unemployed who were still employed in the previous quarter

Sectors business services, trade and manufacturing industry suffer most

The most substantial growth in unemployment was recorded in the sector business services. In the second quarter of this year, 21 thousand people employed in this sector lost their jobs as against 7 thousand in the same period last year. In manufacturing industry, transport and communication trade and financial institutions the number of new unemployed more than doubled, whereas in public administration, education and culture and other services, unemployment declined.

Unemployed who were still employed in the previous quarter by sector

Unemployed who were still employed in the previous quarter by sector

Recession predominantly hits male labour force

More men than women lose their jobs. In the second quarter of this year, 57 thousand men who were employed in the first quarter became unemployed. In the same period in 2008, the reduction was only 27 thousand. The increase in unemployment is much smaller in the female labour force. Proportionally, more women are active in sectors like education, which, at least until now, appear to be unaffected by the recession.

Unemployed who were still employed in the previous quarter by gender

Unemployed who were still employed in the previous quarter by gender

Wendy Smits and Robert de Vries