One in seven fully disabled work in paid jobs

29/11/2007 15:00

In 2005, one in seven fully disabled (approximately 81 thousand people) had paid jobs. Most of them had part-time jobs and worked in sheltered workshops. Part of fully disabled indeed think they are capable of working.

One quarter of fully disabled young people have jobs

Early 2005, the number of fully disabled persons receiving WAO, WAZ or Wajong benefits stood at 588 thousand. Part of them (14 percent) did paid work. Among young (aged 15-34) fully disabled persons, the participation rate was even higher. Approximately one quarter of them did paid work in 2005.

Fully disabled in paid jobs, 2005

Fully disabled in paid jobs, 2005

Many disabled employed in sheltered workshops

In 2005, nearly 40 percent of fully disabled held paid jobs in manufacturing industry. These were mainly jobs in sheltered workshops.
Fully disabled working in paid jobs more often worked part-time hours relative to the rest of the employed population in the 15-64  age group. About one third of disabled had an average working week of less than 20 hours and the jobs they do are usually simple. Approximately 60 percent of fully disabled worked in paid jobs at an elementary or low level.

Disabled working part-time in low-level jobs in manufacturing industry, 2005

Disabled working part-time in low-level jobs in manufacturing industry, 2005

15 percent of disabled consider themselves capable of working

In 2005, 15 percent of all fully disabled indicated they were capable of working. They reported they did not suffer from chronic disorders, diseases or handicaps which prevented them form participating in the labour market. No less than 42 percent of fully disabled in paid jobs indicated they were capable of working. For fully disabled WAO recipients, the rate was 12 percent; 30 percent of fully disabled Wajong recipients – who are generally much younger – indicated they were capable of working.

Fully disabled, who consider themselves capable of working, 2005

Fully disabled, who consider themselves capable of working, 2005

John Michiels