One in five parents do not allow their children to go to allegedly unsafe areas

09/01/2007 14:00

In 2006, one in five parents in the Netherlands stated that they often forbade their children to go to allegedly unsafe areas. With one in four, the rate was even higher in cities. In the provinces of Groningen and Limburg, children were the least free to go where they pleased.

In cities twice as many parents concerned

Parents in highly urbanised areas more often tend to impose restrictions on their children; 30 percent of families in highly urbanised municipal districts as against only 12 percent in rural districts.

Parents who often forbid their children to go to certain unsafe areas by degree of urbanisation, 2006

Parents who often forbid their children to go to certain unsafe areas by degree of urbanisation, 2006

Most apprehensive parents found in Groningen and Limburg

Children in the provinces of Groningen, South Holland, Utrecht and Limburg most frequently faced parental restrictions. One quarter were not allowed to go to places considered unsafe. In the provinces of Zeeland, Drenthe and Overijssel this was less than 15 percent. The high percentage of apprehensive parents in South Holland and Utrecht is due to the relatively high degree of urbanisation, but this does not apply to Groningen and Limburg.

Parents who often forbid their children to go to certain unsafe areas by province, 2006

Parents who often forbid their children to go to certain unsafe areas by province, 2006

Parents with non-western foreign background more strict

Parents with a non-western foreign background tend to be stricter towards their children than native Dutch parents; 31 percent impose restrictions as against 18 percent of native Dutch parents. This is also due to the fact that the majority of people with a foreign background live in cities.

Highly-educated parents allow their children more freedom

Mothers more often impose restrictions on their children than fathers. Apart from gender, the level of education of the parents also plays a part; 14 percent of parents with a vocational college or university degree imposed restrictions on their children, as against 25 percent of parents with only lower secondary general or vocational education. This relation is retained, even if gender and educational discrepancies are taken into account.

Carin Reep