More female managers

11/10/2004 10:00

The number of female managers is on the increase. In 1995 some 14 percent of all managers were women. This had increased to 25 percent in 2002. In health care female managers constitute the majority. In total there were about 44 thousand female managers in 2002.

More women working in higher positions and the sciences

The labour participation of women increased over the last decades. At the same time the share of women working in higher positions and the sciences, to which management belongs, increased. In 1995 three people in ten working in higher positions and the sciences were women. By 2002 this had increased to four in ten, bringing the number of women working in higher positions and sciences to 830 thousand.

Women in higher positions and the sciences

Women in higher positions and the sciences

More women in management

The share of women in management also increased substantially. In 1995 some 14 percent of all managers in higher positions and the sciences were women. This had increased to 25 percent in 2002. The share of women in management, however, was lower than their share in higher positions and the sciences.

Most managers in health care are women

Female managers mainly work in non-commercial services. In 2002 about 36 percent of management in this sector were women. Health care and education employ relatively many highly educated women, so that it stands to reason why the management consists mainly of women. In health and welfare over half of all managers are women.

Women in management by branch of industry, 2002

Women in management by branch of industry, 2002

The private sector has far fewer female managers, namely 13 percent. Managing in manufacturing and construction is male-dominated. Only 2 percent of all managers in industry and construction were women.

Relatively few female managers in education

In virtually all branches of industry the share of women in management was lower than the share of women in higher positions and the sciences. The difference is striking in education, industry and construction. In 2002 some 25 percent of all managers in education were women, whereas over half of the high-level positions and sciences were taken by women.

Ingrid Beckers