Government employees older

15/10/2001 10:00

Sixty percent of government jobs are held by employees aged over forty. Public sector employees are on average a lot older than their colleagues in the private sector. In the private sector two-fifths of employees are over forty, and one fifth are even under 25. In the public sector less than five pecent are younger than 25. Enployees in the subsidised sector too are younger on average than people working in the public sector.

Jobs by age and sector, 2000

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The private sector accounts for 70% of employees in the Netherlands The remainder is equally divided between the subsisded and the public sector, with 14% and 15% of jobs respectively.

Annual wage including special allowances by age an sector, 2000

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The average annual wage of government employees in 2000 was just under 30 thousand euro. In the private sector it was significantly lower at 24 thousand euro. Generally speaking older employees earn more than younger ones. But the difference in wages between the public and the private sectors cannot be completely explained by the age differences, as in nearly all age categories government wages are higher than those in the private sector, with the exception of the group 35-44 year-olds.

To chart the differences in remuneration between the various sectors, more background characteristics have to be taken into account, for example, public sector employees are generally older and have more often worked for the same government for a longer period. In addition, the government employees are better educated on average. And highly educated people tend to earn more than people with less education. Moreover fewer public sector workers with a flexible contract Finally, secondary working conditions also play a part: options schemes, company cars are not included in the annual wages.

Finally, secondary working conditions also play a part: options schemes, company cars are not included in the annual wages.

Job van der Zwan