Income distribution of households; National Accounts

Income distribution of households; National Accounts

Characteristics of households Periods Total amount Uses Total (million euros) Total amount Uses Property income (million euros) Total amount Uses Other current transfers (million euros) Total amount Uses Capital transfers (million euros) Total amount Uses Consumption of fixed capital (million euros) Total amount Uses Social contributions and benefits Net social contributions Households' actual social contributions (million euros) Total amount Uses Social contributions and benefits Net social contributions Households' social contrib. supplements (million euros) Average amount Uses Total (1,000 euro) Average amount Uses Property income (1,000 euro) Average amount Uses Other current transfers (1,000 euro) Average amount Uses Capital transfers (1,000 euro) Average amount Uses Consumption of fixed capital (1,000 euro) Average amount Uses Social contributions and benefits Net social contributions Households' actual social contributions (1,000 euro) Average amount Uses Social contributions and benefits Net social contributions Households' social contrib. supplements (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Uses Total (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Uses Property income (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Uses Other current transfers (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Uses Capital transfers (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Uses Consumption of fixed capital (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Uses Social contributions and benefits Net social contributions Households' actual social contributions (1,000 euro) Standardised amount Uses Social contributions and benefits Net social contributions Households' social contrib. supplements (1,000 euro) Share in adjusted disposable income Uses Total (%) Share in adjusted disposable income Uses Property income (%) Share in adjusted disposable income Uses Other current transfers (%) Share in adjusted disposable income Uses Capital transfers (%) Share in adjusted disposable income Uses Consumption of fixed capital (%) Share in adjusted disposable income Uses Social contributions and benefits Net social contributions Households' actual social contributions (%) Share in adjusted disposable income Uses Social contributions and benefits Net social contributions Households' social contrib. supplements (%)
Other types of households 2019* 11,688 200 953 1,087 1,357 3,622 1,013 23.1 0.4 1.9 2.2 2.7 7.2 2.0 16.0 0.3 1.3 1.5 1.9 5.0 1.4 41.2 0.7 3.4 3.8 4.8 12.8 3.6
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table describes the income distribution of the sector households in the national accounts over different household groups. Households are identified by main source of income, living situation, household composition, age classes of the head of the household, income class by 20% groups, and net worth class by 20% groups.

Data available from: 2015.

Status of the figures:
Data of 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019 are provisional.

Changes as of September 10th 2021:
The figures of 2015-2018 are revised, because national accounts figures are changed due to the revision policy of Statistics Netherlands. For 2018 also microdata are added that were not available before. Results for 2019 are added to the table.

When will new figures be published?
New figures will be released in September 2022.

Description topics

Total amount
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Total
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Social contributions and benefits
Social contributions and benefits are transfers to households, in cash or in kind, intended to relieve them from the financial burden of a number of risks or needs, made through collectively organized schemes, or outside such schemes by government units and NPISHs; they include payments from general government to producers which individually benefit households and which are made in the context of social risks or needs.
Social benefits are transfers to households, intended to relieve them from the financial burden of a number of risks or needs, such as sickness, invalidity, disability, old age, survivors and unemployment.
Net social contributions
Social contributions include social security contributions, private social contributions (among which contributions to pension schemes) and imputed social contributions. Employers, employees, self-employed persons and non-active persons pay these contributions. Actually, the employers' part is paid directly to the insurers. However, in the national accounts, the employers' contributions are supposed to be part of primary income of households (i.e. the income from direct participation in the production process). Therefore, in first instance these contributions are treated as payments by employers to households as compensation of employees, who are deemed to pay them to the insurers in the income account.
Households' actual social contributions
Households' actual social contributions are social contributions payable on their own behalf by employees, self-employed or non-employed persons to social insurance schemes.
Households' social contrib. supplements
Households' social contribution supplements consist of the property income earned during the accounting period on the stock of pension and non-pension entitlements.
Other current transfers
Other current transfers consist of non-life insurance premiums, non-life insurance claims, current transfers within general government, current international co-operation and miscellaneous current transfers.
Capital transfers
Capital transfers are payments for which no quid pro quo by the beneficiary is expected. They burden the wealth of the payer, or are meant to finance fixed capital formation or other long-term expenditures of the receiver. Capital transfers can be classified into capital taxes, investment grants, imputed capital transfers and other capital transfers.
Consumption of fixed capital
The decline in value of fixed assets owned, as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence.

For the estimation of the consumption of fixed capital the perpetual inventory method (PIM) is applied. The capital stock at the beginning of the year is brought to replacement value because of price changes. The fixed capital formation during the year is added to this capital stock. Next it is diminished with the value of capital goods discarded. This gives to value of capital stock at the end of the year. The consumption of fixed obtained by applying a depreciation percentage.
This method may differ considerably from the method used to calculate depreciation in business accounts, which is based on historical costs or fiscal life span.
Average amount
Amount per household.
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Total
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Social contributions and benefits
Social contributions and benefits are transfers to households, in cash or in kind, intended to relieve them from the financial burden of a number of risks or needs, made through collectively organized schemes, or outside such schemes by government units and NPISHs; they include payments from general government to producers which individually benefit households and which are made in the context of social risks or needs.
Social benefits are transfers to households, intended to relieve them from the financial burden of a number of risks or needs, such as sickness, invalidity, disability, old age, survivors and unemployment.
Net social contributions
Social contributions include social security contributions, private social contributions (among which contributions to pension schemes) and imputed social contributions. Employers, employees, self-employed persons and non-active persons pay these contributions. Actually, the employers' part is paid directly to the insurers. However, in the national accounts, the employers' contributions are supposed to be part of primary income of households (i.e. the income from direct participation in the production process). Therefore, in first instance these contributions are treated as payments by employers to households as compensation of employees, who are deemed to pay them to the insurers in the income account.
Households' actual social contributions
Households' actual social contributions are social contributions payable on their own behalf by employees, self-employed or non-employed persons to social insurance schemes.
Households' social contrib. supplements
Households' social contribution supplements consist of the property income earned during the accounting period on the stock of pension and non-pension entitlements.
Other current transfers
Other current transfers consist of non-life insurance premiums, non-life insurance claims, current transfers within general government, current international co-operation and miscellaneous current transfers.
Capital transfers
Capital transfers are payments for which no quid pro quo by the beneficiary is expected. They burden the wealth of the payer, or are meant to finance fixed capital formation or other long-term expenditures of the receiver. Capital transfers can be classified into capital taxes, investment grants, imputed capital transfers and other capital transfers.
Consumption of fixed capital
The decline in value of fixed assets owned, as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence.

For the estimation of the consumption of fixed capital the perpetual inventory method (PIM) is applied. The capital stock at the beginning of the year is brought to replacement value because of price changes. The fixed capital formation during the year is added to this capital stock. Next it is diminished with the value of capital goods discarded. This gives to value of capital stock at the end of the year. The consumption of fixed obtained by applying a depreciation percentage.
This method may differ considerably from the method used to calculate depreciation in business accounts, which is based on historical costs or fiscal life span.
Standardised amount
Amount per household converted to a single-person household.
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Total
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Social contributions and benefits
Social contributions and benefits are transfers to households, in cash or in kind, intended to relieve them from the financial burden of a number of risks or needs, made through collectively organized schemes, or outside such schemes by government units and NPISHs; they include payments from general government to producers which individually benefit households and which are made in the context of social risks or needs.
Social benefits are transfers to households, intended to relieve them from the financial burden of a number of risks or needs, such as sickness, invalidity, disability, old age, survivors and unemployment.
Net social contributions
Social contributions include social security contributions, private social contributions (among which contributions to pension schemes) and imputed social contributions. Employers, employees, self-employed persons and non-active persons pay these contributions. Actually, the employers' part is paid directly to the insurers. However, in the national accounts, the employers' contributions are supposed to be part of primary income of households (i.e. the income from direct participation in the production process). Therefore, in first instance these contributions are treated as payments by employers to households as compensation of employees, who are deemed to pay them to the insurers in the income account.
Households' actual social contributions
Households' actual social contributions are social contributions payable on their own behalf by employees, self-employed or non-employed persons to social insurance schemes.
Households' social contrib. supplements
Households' social contribution supplements consist of the property income earned during the accounting period on the stock of pension and non-pension entitlements.
Other current transfers
Other current transfers consist of non-life insurance premiums, non-life insurance claims, current transfers within general government, current international co-operation and miscellaneous current transfers.
Capital transfers
Capital transfers are payments for which no quid pro quo by the beneficiary is expected. They burden the wealth of the payer, or are meant to finance fixed capital formation or other long-term expenditures of the receiver. Capital transfers can be classified into capital taxes, investment grants, imputed capital transfers and other capital transfers.
Consumption of fixed capital
The decline in value of fixed assets owned, as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence.

For the estimation of the consumption of fixed capital the perpetual inventory method (PIM) is applied. The capital stock at the beginning of the year is brought to replacement value because of price changes. The fixed capital formation during the year is added to this capital stock. Next it is diminished with the value of capital goods discarded. This gives to value of capital stock at the end of the year. The consumption of fixed obtained by applying a depreciation percentage.
This method may differ considerably from the method used to calculate depreciation in business accounts, which is based on historical costs or fiscal life span.
Share in adjusted disposable income
Percentage in gross adjusted disposable income
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Total
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Social contributions and benefits
Social contributions and benefits are transfers to households, in cash or in kind, intended to relieve them from the financial burden of a number of risks or needs, made through collectively organized schemes, or outside such schemes by government units and NPISHs; they include payments from general government to producers which individually benefit households and which are made in the context of social risks or needs.
Social benefits are transfers to households, intended to relieve them from the financial burden of a number of risks or needs, such as sickness, invalidity, disability, old age, survivors and unemployment.
Net social contributions
Social contributions include social security contributions, private social contributions (among which contributions to pension schemes) and imputed social contributions. Employers, employees, self-employed persons and non-active persons pay these contributions. Actually, the employers' part is paid directly to the insurers. However, in the national accounts, the employers' contributions are supposed to be part of primary income of households (i.e. the income from direct participation in the production process). Therefore, in first instance these contributions are treated as payments by employers to households as compensation of employees, who are deemed to pay them to the insurers in the income account.
Households' actual social contributions
Households' actual social contributions are social contributions payable on their own behalf by employees, self-employed or non-employed persons to social insurance schemes.
Households' social contrib. supplements
Households' social contribution supplements consist of the property income earned during the accounting period on the stock of pension and non-pension entitlements.
Other current transfers
Other current transfers consist of non-life insurance premiums, non-life insurance claims, current transfers within general government, current international co-operation and miscellaneous current transfers.
Capital transfers
Capital transfers are payments for which no quid pro quo by the beneficiary is expected. They burden the wealth of the payer, or are meant to finance fixed capital formation or other long-term expenditures of the receiver. Capital transfers can be classified into capital taxes, investment grants, imputed capital transfers and other capital transfers.
Consumption of fixed capital
The decline in value of fixed assets owned, as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence.

For the estimation of the consumption of fixed capital the perpetual inventory method (PIM) is applied. The capital stock at the beginning of the year is brought to replacement value because of price changes. The fixed capital formation during the year is added to this capital stock. Next it is diminished with the value of capital goods discarded. This gives to value of capital stock at the end of the year. The consumption of fixed obtained by applying a depreciation percentage.
This method may differ considerably from the method used to calculate depreciation in business accounts, which is based on historical costs or fiscal life span.