Sector accounts; seasonally adjusted data, National Accounts

Sector accounts; seasonally adjusted data, National Accounts

Seasonal and working day adjustment Periods Households including NPISHs Gross operating surplus (million euros) Households including NPISHs Gross disposable income (million euros) Households including NPISHs Gross saving (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Final consumption expenditure (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Gross fixed capital formation (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Property income (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Current taxes on income and wealth (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Net social contributions (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Other current transfers (million euros) Households including NPISHs Uses Adjustm. change in pension entitlements (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Exports of goods and services (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Paid primary income (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Paid current transfers (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Adjustm. change in pension entitlements (million euros) Rest of the world Uses Paid capital transfers (million euros)
Original, unadjusted data 2021 3rd quarter* 27,708 104,707 18,239 93,612 13,888 1,241 21,212 45,776 6,496 0 183,466 61,730 3,715 0 203
Seasonally and working day adjusted data 2021 3rd quarter* 27,610 111,109 24,071 92,346 14,449 1,241 24,019 46,016 6,538 0 185,634 61,729 4,052 0 203
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table provides an overview of some non-financial transactions and balancing items of the institutional sectors of the Dutch economy. The data is presented both seasonally and working day adjusted and unadjusted. Adjustments for seasonal effects and working day effects assist in the drawing of conclusions on quarter-to-quarter developments and help to reveal trends. The non-seasonally adjusted data are identical to (sums of) the non-consolidated data from the table 'current transactions by sector'. For total government revenue and expenditure the data are identical to sums of consolidated data.

Data available from first quarter 1999.

Status of the figures:
The figures from 1995 up to and including 2018 are final. Data of 2019, 2020 and 2021 are provisional.

Changes as of December 24th, 2021:
Data on the third quarter of 2021 have been added.

When will new figures be published?
The first quarterly estimate is available 85 days after the end of each reporting quarter. The first quarter may be revised in September, the second quarter in December. Should further quarterly information become available thereafter, the estimates for the first three quarters may be revised in March. If (new) annual figures become available in June, the quarterly figures will be revised again to bring them in line with the annual figures.

Description topics

Households including NPISHs
Households including non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH)
The households sector consists of individuals or groups of individuals as consumers and as entrepreneurs producing market goods and non-financial and financial services (market producers) provided that the production of goods and services is not by separate entities treated as quasi-corporations. It also includes individuals or groups of individuals as producers of goods and non-financial services for exclusively own final use.
The sector households includes all natural persons who are resident for more than one year in the Netherlands, irrespective of their nationality. On the other hand Dutch citizens who stay abroad for longer than one year do not belong to the Dutch sector households.
The sector households does not only cover independently living persons, but also persons in nursing homes, old people's homes, prisons, boarding schools, etc. If persons are entrepreneurs, their business also belongs to the sector households. This is the case for self-employed persons (one-man business). Large autonomous unincorporated enterprises (quasi-corporations) are included in the sector non-financial or financial corporations.

The non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) sector consists of non-profit institutions which are separate legal entities, which serve households and which are private non-market producers. Their principal resources are voluntary contributions in cash or in kind from households in their capacity as consumers, from payments made by general government and from property income.
Examples are religious organisations, charity organisations, political parties, trade unions and cultural, sports and recreational organisations.
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual or collective needs. Expenses may be made at home or abroad, but they are always made by resident institutional units, that is households or institutions residing in the Netherlands. By definition only households, non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) and government institutions consume. Enterprises do not: expenses they make on goods and services are thought to serve production and are therefore classified as intermediate consumption of fixed capital formation. The general government is a special case. The government also has intermediate consumption, just like enterprises. But the output delivered by the government which is not directly paid for, non-market output (like safety), is classified as consumption by the general government. It is said that the government 'consumes its own production'. The system of national accounts demands that all that is produced is also consumed (or serves as an investment). By convention, government output is consumed by the government itself. This is not the only consumption by the general government. It also contains social transfers in kind. In the Netherlands this mainly concerns health care bills paid for by the government and an allowance for the rent.
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licences.
Property income
Property income is the income receivable by the owner of a financial asset or a tangible non-produced asset in return for providing funds to, or putting the tangible non-produced asset at the deposal of, another institutional unit.
Current taxes on income and wealth
Current taxes on income and wealth of corporations consist of corporation tax and dividend tax. These taxes are based on the profits of corporations.
Current taxes on income and wealth of households include all taxes, which are periodically imposed on income and wealth, such as the income tax, the wage tax and the tax on net wealth of individuals. Non-periodical levies, such as inheritance tax are defined as capital transfers. Several types of taxes are simultaneously seen as taxes on production and imports when imposed on producers and as taxes on income and wealth when imposed on consumers. For instance, motor vehicle tax is a tax on production when it is imposed on company cars and it is a tax on income and wealth and imports when it is imposed on cars for private use.
The treatment of dividend tax results from the recording of dividends. Because dividends are recorded gross, i.e. before deduction of dividend tax, dividend tax is in all cases recorded at the receiving sector. The same applies for the dividend tax to and from the rest of the world.
Net social contributions
Social contributions include social security contributions, private social contributions (among which contributions to pension schemes) and imputed social contributions. Employers, employees, self-employed persons and non-active persons pay these contributions. Actually, the employers' part is paid directly to the insurers. However, in the national accounts, the employers' contributions are supposed to be part of primary income of households (i.e. the income from direct participation in the production process). Therefore, in first instance these contributions are treated as payments by employers to households as compensation of employees, who are deemed to pay them to the insurers in the income account.
Other current transfers
Other current transfers consist of non-life insurance premiums, non-life insurance claims, current transfers within general government, current international co-operation and miscellaneous current transfers.
Adjustm. change in pension entitlements
Since households are treated in the financial accounts as owners of the pension entitlements an adjustment item is necessary to ensure that any excess of contributions to pension schemes over pension benefits does not affect household savings. This adjustment is equal to the difference between net pension contributions (including imputed contributions) and pension benefits.
Gross operating surplus
The surplus that remains after compensation of employees and taxes less subsidies on production and imports have been subtracted from the sum of value added at basic prices. For the self-employed (who are part of the sector households) the surplus is called mixed income, it is partly a reward for their entrepreneurship compensation for their labour.

In the system of national accounts gross means that consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) has not been subtracted. When it has, net is used. Depreciation must be paid for from the gross operating surplus.
Gross disposable income
The sum of the gross disposable incomes of the institutional sectors. Gross national disposable income equals gross national income (at market prices) minus current transfers (current taxes on income, wealth et cetera, social contributions, social benefits and other current transfers) paid to non-resident units, plus current transfers received by resident units from the rest of the world. Because disposable national income is not a production concept but an income concept, it is usually expressed in net terms, i.e. after deduction of depreciation (consumption of fixed capital).
Gross saving
The portion of national disposable income that has not been used for final consumption expenditure.
Rest of the world
The rest of the world sector is a grouping of units without any characteristic functions and resources; it consists of non-resident units insofar as they are engaged in transactions with resident institutional units, or have other economic links with resident units. Its accounts provide an overall view of the economic relationships linking the national economy with the rest of the world. The institutions of the EU and international organisations are included.
The rest of the world is not a sector for which complete sets of accounts have to be kept, but it is convenient to treat the rest of the world as a sector. Sectors are obtained by disaggregating the total economy to obtain more homogeneous groups of resident institutional units, which are similar in respect to their economic behaviour, objectives and functions. This is not the case for the rest of the world sector: for this sector, there are recorded the transactions and other flows of non-financial and financial corporations, non-profit institutions, households and general government with non-resident institutional units and other economic relationships between residents and non-residents, e.g. claims by residents on non-residents.
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Exports of goods and services
Transactions in goods and services (sales, barter and gifts) from residents (in the Netherlands) to non-residents. Exports of goods occurs when economic ownership of goods is passed from residents to non-residents. This applies irrespective of corresponding physical movements of goods across frontiers. An enterprise or institution is considered residential after it has been active in the Netherlands for at least one year. This applies irrespective of the question whether the enterprise or institute has foreign owners.
Paid primary income
Compensation of employees, property income and (EU) subsidies paid from the rest of the world to the Netherlands.
Paid current transfers
Current taxes on income and wealth, social contributions, social benefits in cash and other current transfers paid from rest of the world to the Netherlands.
Adjustm. change in pension entitlements
Since households are treated in the financial accounts as owners of the pension entitlements an adjustment item is necessary to ensure that any excess of contributions to pension schemes over pension benefits does not affect household savings. This adjustment is equal to the difference between net pension contributions (including imputed contributions) and pension benefits.
Paid capital transfers
Capital transfers paid from the rest of the world to the Netherlands.