Current transactions by sectors; National Accounts

Table description


This table provides an overview of the non-financial transactions of the institutional sectors of the Dutch economy, distinguishing between uses and resources. Non-financial transactions consist of current transactions and transactions from the capital account. Furthermore, this table provides the main balancing items of the (sub)sectors.
Non-financial transactions are estimated for the main institutional sectors of the economy and the rest of the world.
Sectors are presented both consolidated and non-consolidated.

Data available from:
Annual figures from 1995.
Quarterly figures from first quarter 1999.

Status of the figures:
The figures from 1995 up to and including 2019 are final. Data of 2020, 2021 and 2022 are provisional.

Adjustments as of September 23rd, 2022:
Data on the second quarter of 2022 have been added.
The method for calculating the profits received from and paid to the rest of the world for non-financial corporations has been improved. This impacts several balancing items. As part of these profits pass through financial holdings, paid profits by financial institutions are also changed.

When will new figures be published?
Annual figures: Provisional data are published 6 months after the end of the reporting year. Final data are released 18 months after the end of the reporting year.
Quarterly figures: The first quarterly estimate is available 85 days after the end of each reporting quarter. The first quarter may be revised in September, the second quarter in December. Should further quarterly information become available thereafter, the estimates for the first three quarters may be revised in March. If (new) annual figures become available in June, the quarterly figures will be revised again to bring them in line with the annual figures.

Description topics

Resources
Resources are transactions add to the economic value of sectors.
Output
The ensemble of goods and services produced. Also called production. Three types of output are distinguished:
- market output: goods and services sold at a market or intended for sale at a market
- the own-account production of all goods that are retained by their producers for their own final consumption or gross fixed capital formation.
- non-market output: goods and services delivered for free or at economically non-significant prices to other units

Output is valued at basic prices. These are the prices experienced by the producers: product-related taxes have been subtracted from the original prices, subsidies haven been added to them. Costs of transportation, when charged separately by the producer, are not included. Changes in the values of financial and non-financial assets during the reference period are not included either.

Included is the output by all kind-of-activity units residing in the Netherlands, including those that are held by foreign owners. The kind-of-activity units include general government units and other non-commercial units.
Market output
Market output consists of output that is disbursed of on the market or intended to be disbursed of on the market. Market output includes:
- products sold at economically significant prices;
- products bartered;
- products used for payments in kind, including compensation of employees in kind and mixed income in kind;
- products supplied by one local Kind-of-activity unit to another within the same institutional unit to be used as intermediate inputs or for final uses;
- products added to the inventories of finished goods and work-in-progress intended for one or other of the above uses (including natural growth of animal of vegetable products and uncompleted structures for which the buyer is unknown).
Total
Financial intermediation service (FISIM)
The concept of imputed bank services encompasses the remuneration for financial services which are not paid for directly. This remuneration is included in the actual interest paid or received. In the national accounts this indirect remuneration is specified as financial intermediation service charge indirectly measured.
The size of the imputed bank services is determined on the basis of a ‘reference rate’. This reference rate equals the rate of the interbank loans. The difference between the reference rate and the actual interest paid to depositors or the actual interest received from borrowers is the indirectly measured financial intermediation service charge. The actual interest paid and received is corrected for these imputed bank services.
Other market output
Market output consists of output that is disbursed of on the market or intended to be disbursed of on the market. Market output includes:
- products sold at economically significant prices;
- products bartered;
- products used for payments in kind, including compensation of employees in kind and mixed income in kind;
- products supplied by one local Kind-of-activity unit to another within the same institutional unit to be used as intermediate inputs or for final uses;
- products added to the inventories of finished goods and work-in-progress intended for one or other of the above uses (including natural growth of animal of vegetable products and uncompleted structures for which the buyer is unknown).
Non-market output
Non-market output is output that is provided to other units for free, or at prices that are not economically significant. Non-market output is subdivided into two items: 'Payments for non-market output', which consists of various fees and charges, and 'Non-market output, other', which is output provided for free.
Non-market output is produced for the following reasons.
- It may be technically impossible to make individuals pay for collective services because their consumption of such services cannot be monitored and controlled. The production of collective services is organized by government units and financed out of funds other than receipts from sales, namely taxation or other government incomes.
- Government units and NPISHs may also produce and supply goods or services to individual households for which they could charge but choose not to do so as a matter of social or economic policy. Examples are the provision of education or health services, for free or at prices that are not economically significant.
Total
Payments for non-market output
Payments for non-market output is output that is provided to other units at prices that are not economically significant.
Non-market output is produced for the following reasons.
- It may be technically impossible to make individuals pay for collective services because their consumption of such services cannot be monitored and controlled. The production of collective services is organized by government units and financed out of funds other than receipts from sales, namely taxation or other government incomes.
- Government units and NPISHs may also produce and supply goods or services to individual households for which they could charge but choose not to do so as a matter of social or economic policy. Examples are the provision of education or health services, for free or at prices that are not economically significant.
Other non-market output
Other non-market output is output that is provided to other units for.
Non-market output is produced for the following reasons.
- It may be technically impossible to make individuals pay for collective services because their consumption of such services cannot be monitored and controlled. The production of collective services is organized by government units and financed out of funds other than receipts from sales, namely taxation or other government incomes.
- Government units and NPISHs may also produce and supply goods or services to individual households for which they could charge but choose not to do so as a matter of social or economic policy. Examples are the provision of education or health services, for free or at prices that are not economically significant.
Uses
Uses are transactions appear which deduces the economic value of sectors.
Final consumption expenditure
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licenses.
Actual individual final consumption
Expenditure on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs.
Social transfers in kind
Social transfers in kind consist of individual goods and services provided for free or at prices that are not economically significant to individual households by government units and NPISHs, whether purchased on the market or produced as non-market output by government units or NPISHs. They are financed out of taxation, other government income or social security contributions, or out of donations and property income in the case of NPISHs.
Transfers in kind non-market production
Social transfers in kind are individual goods and services provided directly to the beneficiaries by non-market producers. Any payments made by the households themselves should be deducted.
Transfers in kind market production
Individual goods and services in the form of reimbursements by social security funds of approved expenditures made by households on specific goods and services; or
provided directly to the beneficiaries by market producers from which general government purchases the corresponding goods and services.
Any payments made by the households themselves are to be deducted.