Key figures by sector; National Accounts

Table description


This table presents a number of key figures of the sector accounts. These main indicators provide the most important information on the total economy and on the main institutional sectors of the economy: non-financial corporations, financial corporations, general government, households including non-profit institutions serving households and the rest of the world.

Data available from:
Annual figures from 1995.
Quarterly figures from first quarter 1999.

Status of the figures:
The figures from 1995 up to and including 2019 are final. Data of 2020, 2021 and 2022 are provisional.

Adjustments as of September 23rd, 2022:
Data on the second quarter of 2022 have been added.
The method for calculating the profits received from and paid to the rest of the world for non-financial corporations has been improved for the period from 1995 onwards. This impacts several key figures. As part of these profits pass through financial holdings, paid profits by financial institutions are also changed.
The key figure total expenditure by the government has been adjusted. The paid taxes on income and wealth by the government were wrongly omitted in the calculation of this figure.

When will new figures be published?
Annual figures: Provisional data are published 6 months after the end of the reporting year. Final data are released 18 months after the end of the reporting year.
Quarterly figures: The first quarterly estimate is available 85 days after the end of each reporting quarter. The first quarter may be revised in September, the second quarter in December. Should further quarterly information become available thereafter, the estimates for the first three quarters may be revised in March. If (new) annual figures become available in June, the quarterly figures will be revised again to bring them in line with the annual figures.

Description topics

Rest of the world
The rest of the world sector is a grouping of units without any characteristic functions and resources; it consists of non-resident units insofar as they are engaged in transactions with resident institutional units, or have other economic links with resident units. Its accounts provide an overall view of the economic relationships linking the national economy with the rest of the world. The institutions of the EU and international organisations are included.
The rest of the world is not a sector for which complete sets of accounts have to be kept, but it is convenient to treat the rest of the world as a sector. Sectors are obtained by disaggregating the total economy to obtain more homogeneous groups of resident institutional units, which are similar in respect to their economic behaviour, objectives and functions. This is not the case for the rest of the world sector: for this sector, there are recorded the transactions and other flows of non-financial and financial corporations, non-profit institutions, households and general government with non-resident institutional units and other economic relationships between residents and non-residents, e.g. claims by residents on non-residents.
Net exports share
The difference between exports and imports of goods and services as a percentage of gross domestic product.
Net exports
The difference between exports and imports of goods and services.
Net primary income abroad
The difference between the received primary income from the rest of the world and the paid primary income to the rest of the world. Primary income consists of compensation of employees, taxes and subsidies on production and imports, and property income.
Net current transfers abroad
The difference between the received current transfers from the rest of the world and the paid current transfers to the rest of the world. Current transfers are dividend tax, social security benefits, other current transfers, and adjustment for the change in pension entitlements.
Net capital transfers abroad
The difference between the received capital transfers from the rest of the world and the paid capital transfers to the rest of the world.
Capital transfers are transactions, either in cash or in kind, in which the ownership of an asset (other than cash and inventories) is transferred from one institutional unit to another, or in which cash is transferred to enable the recipient to acquire another asset, or in which the funds realised by the disposal of another asset are transferred. The receipt of a capital transfer by a recipient is generally meant to finance fixed capital formation or other long-term expenses.
Surplus on current transactions
The net lending (if positive) or borrowing (if negative) of the total economy to / from the rest of the world on current transactions (trade, primary income, current transfers). The surplus of the nation on current transactions is the last item in the use of income account to the rest of the world and consists of: net exports, net primary income from the rest of the world and net current transfers from the rest of the world. The surplus of the nation on current transactions equals the net national savings less the net fixed capital formation.
Net external assets
The net external assets of the Netherlands is the balance between all financial assets owned by Dutch residents in foreign countries and all Dutch financial liabilities owed to foreign residents.
Net external assets; market value
The net external assets of the Netherlands is the balance between all financial assets owned by Dutch residents in foreign countries and all Dutch financial liabilities owed to foreign residents. A market value correction is made to adjust the worth of foreign direct investment of mother corporations based on the value of their listed shares.