Gross fixed capital formation by type and by sector; National Accounts

Gross fixed capital formation by type and by sector; National Accounts

Institutional sectors Periods Volume changes on previous year Sales of used fixed assets (-) (%) Volume changes on previous year Gross fixed capital formation (%)
Total domestic sectors 2020* -3.7 -4.1
Corporations, households and NPISHs 2020* -9.2 -5.3
General government 2020* 27.1 1.9
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table provides figures on fixed capital formation by type of assets and by institutional sectors. It shows which assets have been purchased by which sector. Thse assets are used in a production process for more than one year.

Data available from: 1995.

Status of the figures:
Data from 1995 up to and including 2019 are final. Data of 2020 are provisional.

Changes as of June 24th 2021:
Data of 2020 have been added to this table.

Statistics Netherlands has carried out a revision of the national accounts recently. New statistical sources and estimation methods have been used during the revision. This table provides the data after revision. It replaces table Gross fixed capital formation by type and by sector; NA, 1969-2016. For further information see section 3.

When will new figures be published?
Provisional data are published 6 months after the end of the reporting year. Final data are released 18 months after the end of the reporting year.

Description topics

Volume changes on previous year
The weighted average of the changes in the quantity and quality of the components of a certain goods or service transaction or balancing item, annual percentage changes.
Sales of used fixed assets (-)
Sales of used fixed assets (-).
Gross fixed capital formation
Expenditure on produced assets that are used in a production process for more than one year. This may concern a building, dwelling, transport equipment or a machine. This in contrast with goods and services which are used up during the production process, the so-called intermediate use (e.g. iron ore). Fixed capital does lose value over time as a result of normal wear and tear and obsolescence. This is called consumption of fixed capital (also called depreciation). The value of fixed capital formation in which the consumption of fixed capital is not deducted is called gross fixed capital formation. Deduction of the consumption of fixed capital results in net fixed capital formation.

The following types of fixed assets exist: dwellings and other buildings and structures, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, weapon systems (included in machinery and equipment), computers, software, telecommunication equipment, research and development, cultivated biological resources, mineral exploration and evaluation, and costs of ownership transfer on non-produced assets, like land, contracts, leases and licences.