Health, lifestyle, health care use and supply, causes of death; key figures

Table description


This table provides an overview of the key figures on health and care available on StatLine. All figures are taken from other tables on StatLine, either directly or through a simple conversion. In the original tables, breakdowns by characteristics of individuals or other variables are possible.
The period after the year of review before data become available differs between the data series.
The number of exam passes/graduates in year t is the number of persons who obtained a diploma in school/study year starting in t-1 and ending in t.

Data available from: 2001

Status of the figures:
Most figures are definite.
Figures reported for the last year are provisional for:
- causes of death;
- perinatal mortality at pregnancy lasting at least 22 weeks (WHO);
- diagnoses known to the general practitioner;
- hospital admissions by some diagnoses;
- average period of hospitalisation;
- supplied drugs;
- AWBZ/Wlz/Wmo-funded long term care;
- physicians and nurses employed in care;
- Mbo health care graduates;
- Hbo nursing graduates / medicine graduates (university);
- profitability and operating results at institutions.
Figures reported for the last two years are provisional for:
- persons employed in health and welfare.
For expenditures of care, figures for 2019 are provisional; the figures for 2017-2018 are revised provisional.

Changes as of 15 July 2020:
More recent figures have been added for:
- crude birth rate;
- causes of death;
- life expectancy;
- life expectancy at age 65;
- life expectancy in perceived good health;
- self-perceived health;
- diagnoses known to the general practitioner;
- hospital admissions by some diagnoses;
- sickness absence;
- average period of hospitalisation;
- contacts with health professionals;
- smoking, heavy drinkers, physical activity;
- overweight;
- high blood pressure;
- persons employed in health and welfare;
- persons employed in healthcare;
- Hbo nursing graduates / medicine graduates (university);
- expenditures on care;
- average distance to facilities1
In the series of Hbo nursing graduates the figures are changed slightly as of 2013 due to revision.

When will new figures be published?
New figures will be published December 2020.

Description topics

Expenditures on care
Expenditure on care
Expenditure on health and social care including child care, by type of supplier. All activities within the area of health and social care are considered, irrespective of whether it concerns a major or minor activity of the economic units. These figures refer to a broader definition than internationally used in the System of Health Accounts, that refers to health care including long term nursing care (health).
Hospitals and medical specialists
Institutions and practices in which during day and/or night all kinds of medical specialistic curative care is offered.
Hospital: A formally recognised institution where medical specialists provide round-the-clock medical care.
Practice of medical specialist: Medical care provided by a certified medical specialist (excluding help provided in hospitals).
Care supply
Quantitative data on care providers: distance to care provider, institutions with small profitability, share of overhead in institutions.
Care institutions with profitability <0%
Percentage of companies in a certain SBI class (SBI = Dutch Standard Industrial Classification) whose profitability is less than 0%.

Profitability

Profitability is the sum of the operating result, financial result and extraordinary items, divided by total earnings. It is an indicator of how profitable the company is.

SBI 2008: Statistics Netherlands' Standard Industrial Classification of all Economic Activities 2008.

The SBI is a systematic hierarchical classification of economic activities. The most recent version is SBI 2008. It is used by Statistics Netherlands among other things to classify business entities according to their main activity.
The SBI 2008 has six levels. The SBI codes to the level of classes (4 digits), with a number of exceptions, the same as determined by Eurostat NACE REV. 1 (Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté Européenne) which is used in all EU Member States. The sub-class, denoted by 5 digits, is a further detailed breakdown by the Netherlands.
Hospitals
The total of health care institutions in SBI classes:
- 86101 University medical centres
- 86102 General hospitals
- 86103 Specialised hospitals

86101 University medical centres
Teaching hospitals and university medical centres. Hospitals where all forms of specialist medical treatment are provided during day and night time, linked to a university and approved by the Act on university education'.

86102 General hospitals
Hospitals where all forms of specialist medical treatment are provided during day and night time.

86103 Specialised hospitals
Rehabilitation centres where patients stay overnight stay and other specialised hospitals. Specialised hospitals are divided into two categories, namely: rehabilitation centres and other specialised hospitals.
A rehabilitation centre is an institution where patients can recover from an impairment or limitation of the musculoskeletal system, or learn how to cope with a disability.
A specialised hospital is an institution that provides medical and nursing care for a specific illness, disease or disorder group or to persons in a certain age group; e.g. asthma clinics, epilepsy clinics, cancer clinics, eye hospitals, orthopaedic institutions and sanatoriums.


Up to and including 2014, only health care institutions were included which were funded under the Health Insurance (Zvw) or General Exceptional Medical Expenses Act (AWBZ).
86104 Mental health hospitals
Mental health and substance abuse hospitals

SBI class 86104 includes:
- Specialist medical centres for treatment and care with the possibility of full-time residential care, specifically focused on psychological syndromes, e.g. general psychiatric hospitals, psychiatric clinics for children and adolescents;
- Clinics for treatment and care of drug addicts with the possibility of full-time residential care (addiction clinics);
- Treatment of people who have committed or who threaten to commit an offence and for psychiatric disorders, e.g. forensic-psychiatric hospitals, institutions for TBS (i.e. convicted persons placed under a hospital order) with the possibility of full-time residential care;
- Institutions for care and supervision in a protected environment (full-time residential care) of psychiatric patients with psychosocial problems and reduced ability to cope, such as regional institutions for sheltered housing.


Up to and including 2014, also SBI class 86222 was included, containing practices of psychiatrists and day-care centers for social health.
Up to and including 2014, only health care institutions were included which were funded under the Health Insurance (Zvw) or General Exceptional Medical Expenses Act (AWBZ).
Operating result per fte
Total operating result divided by total number of full-time equivalents (fte) of employees.
The full-time equivalents is a measure of labour volume, calculated by converting all full-time and part-time jobs to full-time jobs.
An employee is a person carrying out work in return for remuneration.
Hospitals
The total of health care institutions in SBI classes:
- 86101 University medical centres
- 86102 General hospitals
- 86103 Specialised hospitals

86101 University medical centres
Teaching hospitals and university medical centres. Hospitals where all forms of specialist medical treatment are provided during day and night time, linked to a university and approved by the Act on university education'.

86102 General hospitals
Hospitals where all forms of specialist medical treatment are provided during day and night time.

86103 Specialised hospitals
Rehabilitation centres where patients stay overnight stay and other specialised hospitals. Specialised hospitals are divided into two categories, namely: rehabilitation centres and other specialised hospitals.
A rehabilitation centre is an institution where patients can recover from an impairment or limitation of the musculoskeletal system, or learn how to cope with a disability.
A specialised hospital is an institution that provides medical and nursing care for a specific illness, disease or disorder group or to persons in a certain age group; e.g. asthma clinics, epilepsy clinics, cancer clinics, eye hospitals, orthopaedic institutions and sanatoriums.


Up to and including 2014, only health care institutions were included which were funded under the Health Insurance (Zvw) or General Exceptional Medical Expenses Act (AWBZ).
86104 Mental health hospitals
Mental health and substance abuse hospitals

SBI class 86104 includes:
- Specialist medical centres for treatment and care with the possibility of full-time residential care, specifically focused on psychological syndromes, e.g. general psychiatric hospitals, psychiatric clinics for children and adolescents;
- Clinics for treatment and care of drug addicts with the possibility of full-time residential care (addiction clinics);
- Treatment of people who have committed or who threaten to commit an offence and for psychiatric disorders, e.g. forensic-psychiatric hospitals, institutions for TBS (i.e. convicted persons placed under a hospital order) with the possibility of full-time residential care;
- Institutions for care and supervision in a protected environment (full-time residential care) of psychiatric patients with psychosocial problems and reduced ability to cope, such as regional institutions for sheltered housing.


Up to and including 2014, also SBI class 86222 was included, containing practices of psychiatrists and day-care centers for social health.
Up to and including 2014, only health care institutions were included which were funded under the Health Insurance (Zvw) or General Exceptional Medical Expenses Act (AWBZ).