Health, lifestyle, health care use and supply, causes of death; key figures

Table description


This table provides an overview of the key figures on health and care available on StatLine. All figures are taken from other tables on StatLine, either directly or through a simple conversion. In the original tables, breakdowns by characteristics of individuals or other variables are possible.
The period after the year of review before data become available differs between the data series.
The number of exam passes/graduates in year t is the number of persons who obtained a diploma in school/study year starting in t-1 and ending in t.

Data available from: 2001

Status of the figures:
Most figures are definite.
Figures reported for the last year are provisional for:
- causes of death;
- diagnoses known to the general practitioner;
- hospital admissions by some diagnoses;
- average period of hospitalisation;
- supplied drugs;
- physicians and nurses employed in care;
- Mbo health care graduates;
- Hbo nursing graduates / medicine graduates (university);
- profitability and operating results at institutions;
- perinatal mortality at pregnancy lasting at least 22 weeks (WHO);
- AWBZ/Wlz-funded long term care.
Figures reported for the last two years are provisional for:
- persons employed in health and welfare;
- persons employed in healthcare.
For expenditures of care, figures for 2021 are provisional; the figures for 2019 and 2020 are revised provisional.

Changes as of 14 July 2022:
More recent figures have been added for:
- crude birth rate;
- causes of death;
- life expectancy;
- self-perceived health;
- diagnoses known to the general practitioner;
- hospital admissions by some diagnoses;
- sickness absence;
- average period of hospitalisation;
- supplied drugs;
- contacts with health professionals;
- youth care;
- smoking, heavy drinkers, physical activity;
- overweight;
- high blood pressure;
- physicians and nurses employed in care;
- persons employed in health and welfare;
- persons employed in healthcare;
- Mbo health care graduates;
- Hbo nursing graduates / medicine graduates (university);
- expenditures on care;
- average distance to facilities;
- profitability and operating results at institutions;
A new series was added for hospital discharges of COVID19.

Changes as of 22 December 2021:
A new series was added on COVID19 as cause of death.

Changes as of 9 June 2021:
Series on Mbo health care graduates have been replaced by series on Mbo nursing and caring graduates.
New series have been added on youth care and indications for long term care.
Series on AWBZ/Wmo-funded nonresidential care have been removed.

When will new figures be published?
New figures will be published in December 2022.

Description topics

Births, deaths and life expectancy
Crude birth rate, the number of live births to teenage mothers and older mothers, some causes of death, perinatal mortality, life expectancy and healthy life expectancy.
Crude birth rate
Live born children per thousand of the average population.
Live births to teenage mothers
Live born children to mothers younger than 20 years at the infant's birth.

Mother’s age (exact):
The number of whole years that have passed since the mother's date of birth.

Live born child:
A baby showing some sign of life after birth, regardless of the duration of pregnancy.
Live births to 35+ mothers
Live born children to mothers aged 35 years or older at the infant's birth.

Mother’s age (exact):
The number of whole years that have passed since the mother's date of birth.

Live born child:
A baby showing some sign of life after birth, regardless of the duration of pregnancy.
Live births to 40+ mothers
Live born children to mothers aged 40 years or older at the infant's birth.

Mother’s age (exact):
The number of whole years that have passed since the mother's date of birth.

Live born child:
A baby showing some sign of life after birth, regardless of the duration of pregnancy.
Life expectancy
The number of years someone of a certain age is expected to live, assuming the mortality risk remains the same.
At birth, men
At birth, women
At age 65, men
At age 65, women
Life expectancy in perceived good health
The number of years a person can expect to live in perceived good health, assuming the mortality risk and risks for good/poor health remain the same.

People are considered healthy when answering 'good' or 'very good' to the CBS Health Survey question 'How is your health in general?' .
At birth, men
At birth, women
At age 65, men
At age 65, women