Environmental and economic key figures 1995-2012

Environmental and economic key figures 1995-2012

Origin-destination Periods Environment physical data Net energy consumption (PJ) Environment physical data Tap water use (mln m3) Environment physical data Solid waste production (mln kg) Environment physical data Heavy metals to water (1 000 heavy metal-equivalents) Environment physical data Nutrients to water (1 000 nutrient-equivalents) Environment physical data Climate change (greenhouse gases) (mln greenhousegas-equivalents) Environment physical data Acidification (mld acid-equivalents) Environment physical data Ozone layer depletion (1 000 CFK12-equivalents) Environment physical data Fine dust (mln kg) Environment financial data Revenues environmental fees and -taxes (mln euros) Environment financial data Environmental expenditure (mln euros) Environment financial data Environmental investment (mln euros)
Total origin 2012* . . . . . 230,302 28.4 124.5 38.6 . . .
Total Dutch economy 2012* 3,602 . . . . 230,302 20.0 124.5 34.9 22,645 . .
A-U All economic activities 2012* 2,887 . . . . 185,519 18.1 110.9 26.6 8,405 . .
A Agriculture, forestry and fishing 2012* 165 . . . . 27,835 7.0 0.0 7.0 344 . .
B-E Industry (no construction), energy 2012* 1,867 . . . . 110,007 2.8 85.9 7.9 2,298 . .
B Mining and quarrying 2012* 42 . . . . 2,692 0.1 0.0 0.0 24 . .
C Manufacturing 2012* 1,411 . . . . 45,118 1.8 0.0 7.5 1,967 . .
10-12 Manufacture of food and beverages 2012* 85 . . . . 4,417 0.1 0.0 1.9 434 . .
13-15 Man. of textile-, leatherproducts 2012* 5 . . . . 193 0.0 0.0 0.1 35 . .
16-18 Man. wood en paperprod., printing 2012* 33 . . . . 1,354 0.0 0.0 0.5 121 . .
16 Manufacture of wood products 2012* 3 . . . . 172 0.0 0.0 0.2 13 . .
17 Manufacture of paper 2012* 25 . . . . 1,094 0.0 0.0 0.3 72 . .
18 Printing and reproduction 2012* 5 . . . . 89 0.0 0.0 0.0 35 . .
19 Manufacture of coke and petroleum 2012* 180 . . . . 10,717 0.6 0.0 0.2 568 . .
20-21 Chemistry and pharmaceuticals 2012* 887 . . . . 18,027 0.4 0.0 1.4 400 . .
20 Manufacture of chemicals 2012* . . . . . 17,815 0.4 0.0 1.4 377 . .
21 Manufacture of pharmaceuticals 2012* . . . . . 211 0.0 0.0 0.0 22 . .
22-23 Man. plastics and constructionprod 2012* 39 . . . . 2,043 0.2 0.0 1.2 80 . .
22 Manufacture rubber, plastic products 2012* 12 . . . . 215 0.0 0.0 0.0 36 . .
23 Manufacture of building materials 2012* 27 . . . . 1,828 0.2 0.0 1.2 44 . .
24-25 Man. of basic metals and -products 2012* 140 . . . . 7,037 0.4 0.0 2.0 141 . .
24 Manufacture of basic metals 2012* 129 . . . . 6,570 0.4 0.0 1.5 72 . .
25 Manufacture of metal products 2012* 10 . . . . 468 0.0 0.0 0.4 69 . .
26-27 Elektrical and electron. Industry 2012* 22 . . . . 345 0.0 0.0 0.0 41 . .
28 Manufacture of machinery n.e.c. 2012* 8 . . . . 281 0.0 0.0 0.1 55 . .
29-30 Transport equipment 2012* 5 . . . . 142 0.0 0.0 0.0 37 . .
31-33 Other manufacturing and repair 2012* 7 . . . . 562 0.0 0.0 0.1 53 . .
D Electricity and gas supply 2012* 319 . . . . 49,178 0.6 0.0 0.1 69 . .
E Water supply and waste management 2012* 94 . . . . 10,327 0.2 85.9 0.2 238 . .
F Construction 2012* 59 . . . . 3,992 0.5 25.0 1.9 221 . .
G-I Trade, transport, hotels, catering 2012* 548 . . . . 34,956 7.4 0.0 8.7 2,467 . .
J Information and communication 2012* 17 . . . . 584 0.0 0.0 0.1 127 . .
K Financial institutions 2012* 20 . . . . 623 0.0 0.0 0.1 206 . .
L Renting, buying, selling real estate 2012* 19 . . . . 156 0.0 0.0 0.0 63 . .
M-N Business services 2012* 50 . . . . 2,806 0.2 0.0 0.4 1,753 . .
O-Q Government and care 2012* 109 . . . . 5,612 0.3 0.0 0.4 727 . .
R-U Culture, recreation, other services 2012* 34 . . . . 1,642 0.1 0.0 0.1 200 . .
Total private households 2012* 716 . . . . 40,974 1.8 0.4 8.4 14,240 . .
Other origin 2012* . . . . . 3,663 0.0 13.2 0.0 . . .
Total from abroad 2012* . . . . . 0 8.4 0.0 3.7 . . .
Total destination 2012* . . . . . 230,302 28.4 124.5 38.6 . . .
Total absorption 2012* . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total abroad 2012* . . . . . 0 18.9 0.0 6.5 . . .
Contribution environmental problem 2012* . . . . . 9.6 125.0 32.0 . . .
Source: CBS.
Explanation of symbols

Table description


This table of key figures from the environmental accounts and the national accounts shows contributions to certain environmental issues such as global warming, acidification, environmental costs and environmental taxes by industries and households. In addition, for comparison some economic characteristics of the national accounts as gross value added and labor input of persons are included.

In the environmental accounts, the relationship between the Dutch economy and the environment is described. Because the environmental accounts are consistent with the concepts of the national accounts, both could be compared directly

The environmental accounts are based on figures from the environmental statistics. On eof the main differences between environmental statistics and environmental accounts is that the environmental accounts and the national accounts are based on the residence principle as the basic environmental statistics are based on the Dutch territory.

Data available from: 1995-2012

Status of the figures:
The figures concerning 2011 and 2012 are (revised) provisional. Because this table is discontinued, figures will not be updated anymore.

Changes as of November 12, 2014:
None, this table is discontinued.

When will new figures be published?
Not applicable anymore. This table is replaced by table: Environmental and economic key figures. See paragraph 3.

Description topics

Environment physical data
Net energy consumption
Final energy use for energy and non-energy purposes (for example the use of lubricants) plus the conversion losses of energy (for example energy losses that occur when coal and gas are converted into electricity in power plants).
Tap water use
Water from the tap of drinking water quality produced by the water supply companies and provided to households and businesses.
Tap water is purified groundwater or surface water and transported through a network of pipes.
The use of so-called 'other water' is not included. 'Other water' is water of different, superior or inferior quality compared to tap water.
One can think of unfiltered and filtered water, or distilled and demineralised water.
As part of the environmental accounts, on an annual basis Water Accounts are compiled. Part of these accounts is the (physical) use of water by the different economic activities.
In here a distinction is made between the use of tap water and extraction of groundwater and of surface water.
The water use is allocated to the various industries and households.
Solid waste production
Waste types are categorised according to the European Regulation on Waste Statistics. Waste with commercial value (waste products) and without commercial value (waste residuals) for the producer are taken into account.
Heavy metals to water
A group of metals with a high atomic weight. Highly toxic metals are arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead and zinc. The emissions of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead and zinc can be converted into heavy-metal equivalents and subsequently be added up. The conversion to heavy-metal equivalents takes into account the harmfulness of the substances for the environment (VROM, 1993: Environmental policy performance indicators, A. Adriaanse).
The individual substances have the following corresponding weights in the equivalent:
Zinc: 1/30
Lead: 1/25
Chromium: 1/25
Arsenic: 1/10
Copper: 1/3
Cadmium: 5
Mercury: 100/3
Nutrients to water
Nutrients that are necessary for the growth of plants and crops (e.g. phosphorus and nitrogen). A too high concentration of phosphorus and/or nitrogen is bad for the quality of surface water. The emissions of phosphorus and nitrogen are converted into nutrient equivalents and subsequently added up. The conversion takes into account the harmfulness of the substances for the environment. Phosphorus has a larger weight in the equivalent than nitrogen (factor 10).
Climate change (greenhouse gases)
Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere retain part of the solar heat that reaches the earth. The increased concentration of greenhouse gases means more warmth is retained and the temperature of the earth's surface rises.
This is called the "enhanced greenhouse effect". The most important greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), laughing gas (N2O), HFCs, PFCs and SF6.
Acidification
Process which causes the acidification of soil and water as a result of the emission of polluting substances like NOx, SO2, NH3 and VOS (volatile organic substances) into the air and their consequent penetration into water and soil. Acidifying substances are included under the environmental theme "large-scale air pollution".
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One acidification equivalent is equal to one mole H+. The emission of one kg NOx is equal to 21,7 acidification equivalents, the emission of one 1 kg SO2 is equal to 31,3 acidification equivalents, and the emission of one 1 kg NH3 is equal to 58,8 acidification equivalents.
Ozone layer depletion
Depletion of the ozone layer as a result of emissions of CFCs and halones to air, converted to CFC12 equivalents. The conversion factors are based on the extent to which the different CFCs and halones affect the ozone layer.
Fine dust
Includes only the emission of PM10. PM10 are particles smaller than 10 micrometres, that can penetrate deep into the lungs and are thus harmful to humans.
Environment financial data
Expenditures and revenues related to care for the environment.
Revenues environmental fees and -taxes
Total revenues from environmental levies and environmental taxes.
Environmental levies are imposed by the government to finance specific environmental measures. Environmental taxes are taxes intended to reduce human activities that harm the environment. The revenues from environmental taxes go into the general government revenue and are not used to finance specific environmental policies. Examples of environmental taxes are excise on motor fuels, road tax, the tax on cars and motorcycles and energy tax.
Environmental expenditure
Total of environmental expenditure for own activities. This consists of estimated capital costs (interest and depreciation), current costs en other costs.
Environmental investment
Environmental investment is additional investment as a result of measures to protect, restore or improve the environment.